Members Of Rage Against The Machine, Public Enemy And Cypress Hill Announce New Show & Tease More

first_imgHot on the heels of a successful opening night, the new Prophets of Rage supergroup are keeping things fiery with a newly-announced performance scheduled for this Friday, June 3rd. The band made their debut at the intimate Whisky A Go Go, but will take things to the next level with a set at the Hollywood Palladium in the Los Angeles, CA area.The debut performance featured a stunning blend of Rage Against The Machine, Cypress Hill, and Public Enemy songs, as well as two original tracks and a cover of the Beastie Boys sprinkled in a medley. Considering the band is comprised of three-fourths of RATM, as well as Chuck D (Public Enemy) and B-Real and DJ Lord (Public Enemy), it’s no surprise that those three groups’ iconic catalogues were featured for the performance.You can watch highlights and check out the setlist from the debut here.The band has also revealed a new countdown clock on their website, saying “Next update coming soon.” We’re excited to see what this supergroup has in store.last_img read more

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Tool Announces Spring 2019 Tour Dates

first_imgTool is headed back out on tour this spring. Announced on Monday morning, the popular hard rock band will hit mostly eastern and northern midwest cities across the U.S. throughout the month of May beginning with their appearance at Welcome to Rockville on May 5th.The brief spring tour will see the band making stops in cities including Birmingham, AL on May 7th; Louisville, KY on May 8th; Hampton, VA on May 10th; St. Louis, MO on May 13th; Lincoln, NE on May 16th; Des Moines, IA on May 17th; and wrapping with their appearance at Chicago’s Open Air Festival on May 19th. Also included on the band’s May tour schedule is their appearance at the inaugural Epicenter Festival in Concord, NC on May 11th.Related: King Gizzard And The Lizard Wizard Announces New Album, ‘Fishing For Fishies’The band will also head over to Europe for a run of international dates throughout the month of June and into July beginning on June 2nd in Berlin, Germany. The European run is scheduled to come to a close on July 2nd, after which the band could possibly return Stateside for more shows throughout the latter half of summer.Monday’s announcement comes just a few months after Tool drummer Danny Carey informed fans that the band’s first new studio album since 2006’s 10,000 Days, should arrive sometime next month. A report shared just after the start of the new year stated that their latest studio project was close to completion and in the mixing stage of the recording process.Tickets will go on sale starting March 15th at 10 a.m. Local, and can be purchased here. Fans can reference the listing below for a detailed schedule of the North American leg of shows.Tool 2019 North American Tour Dates05/05 – Jacksonville, FL @ Welcome To Rockville Festival05/07 – Birmingham, AL @ Legacy Arena at The BCC05/08 – Louisville, KY @ KFC Yum! Center05/10 – Hampton, VA @ Hampton Coliseum05/11 – Concord, NC @ Epicenter Festival05/13 – St. Louis, MO @ Enterprise Center05/14 – Kansas City, MO @ Spring Center05/16 – Lincoln, NE @ Pinnacle Bank Arena05/17 – Des Moines, IA @ Wells Fargo Arena05/19 – Bridgeview, IL @ Chicago Open Air Festival06/02 – Berlin, DE @ Mercedes-Benz Arena06/04 – Prague, CZ @ O2 Arena06/05 – Vienna, AT @ Wiener Stadhalle06/07 – Nurburg, DE @ Rock Am Ring Festival06/09 – Nuremberg, DE @ Rock Im Park Festival06/11 – Krakow, PO @ Impact Festival at Tauron Arena06/13 – Florence, IT @ Firenze Rocks Festival06/16 – Donington, GB @ Download Festival06/18 – Amsterdam, NL @ Ziggo Dome06/20 – Copenhagen, DK @ Copenhell Festival06/25 – Zurich, CH @ Hallenstadion06/30 – Madrid, ES @ Download Festival Spain07/02 – Lisbon, PT @ Altice ArenaView Spring 2019 North American Tour Dateslast_img read more

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David Fynn to Headline West End’s School of Rock

first_img They’re in the band! David Fynn will lead the London cast of School of Rock—The Musical as wannabe rock star Dewey Finn. The stage and screen star will be joined by Florence Andrews as Rosalie Mullins, Oliver Jackson as Ned Schneebly and Preeya Kalidas as Patty Di Marco. The previously reported West End production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s hit Broadway tuner is scheduled to begin previews on October 24 at the New London Theatre. Opening night is set for November 14.Fynn’s television credits include The Inbetweeners, Sherlock, Game of Thrones, Pete vs Life and Undateable. On stage he has appeared at the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre and at the Donmar Warehouse in The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.Based on the 2003 Jack Black film of the same title, School of Rock features music from the movie, as well as new music written by Lloyd Webber with lyrics by Glenn Slater and a book by Julian Fellowes. The show follows slacker and wannabe rock star Dewey Finn turn a class of straight-A students into an ear popping, riff scorching, all conquering rock band. Dewey poses as a substitute teacher at a prestigious prep school to make ends meet, and when he discovers his fifth graders’ musical talents, he enlists his class to form a rock group and conquer the Battle of the Bands. As Dewey falls for the beautiful headmistress, can he and his students keep this special assignment secret as they learn to fully embrace the power of rock?The “grown up” cast is completed by Gary Trainor as the alternate Dewey with ensemble members Jonathan Bourne, Nadeem Crowe, Michelle Francis, Rosanna Hyland, Cassandra McCowan, Joel Montague, Andy Rees, Cameron Sharp, Tasha Sheridan, Andrew Spillett and Lucy Vandi and swings, Charlotte Bradford, Jason Denton, Cellen Chugg James, Chris Jenkins, Alfie Parker and Charlotte Scott.The nationwide search to find the three teams of thirteen young performers took place earlier this year. The role of Zack will be alternated by Tom Abisgold, Toby Lee and Jake Slack. The role of Freddy will be alternated by Bailey Cassell, Jude Harper-Wrobel and Noah Key. Giles Carden, Oscar Francisco and James Lawson will alternate the role of Lawrence. Selma Hansen, Lois Jenkins and Sophia Pettit will alternate the role of Katie. Isabelle Methven, Lucy Simmonds and Eva Trodd will alternate the role of Summer. Madeleine Haynes, Leah Levman, and Natasha Raphael will alternate the role of Marcy. Alternating the role of Shonelle are Jaydah Bell-Ricketts, Shoshana Ezequiel and Amelia Poggenpoel. Alternating the role of Sophia are Lola Moxom, Mia Roberts and Grace Schnieder. Alternating the role of Tomika are Nicole Dube, Amma Ris and Adithi Sujith. Jobe Hart, Joshua Vaughan and Logan Walmsley will alternate the role of Billy. Presley Charman, Lucas Chow and Ben Dawson will alternate the role of Mason. The role of James will be alternated by Bradley Bissett, Denzel Eboji and Sonny Kirby. The role of Madison will be alternated by Zachary Dowlatshahi, Harry Egertonn and Jacob Swann.The production will feature direction by Laurence Connor, with choreography by JoAnn M. Hunter, set and costume designs by Anna Louizos, lighting design by Natasha Katz, sound design by Mick Potter, music supervision by John Rigby with Matt Smith as musical director.School of Rock continues to run on Broadway at the Winter Garden, led by Tony nominee Alex Brightman. View Comments David Fynn and the cast of ‘School of Rock'(Photo: Craig Sugden)last_img read more

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FSU program gives minority students an opportunity to test-drive law school

first_imgFSU program gives minority students an opportunity to test-drive law school July 1, 2005 Senior Editor Regular News FSU program gives minority students an opportunity to test-drive law school The goal is to steer undergraduates toward the law Jan Pudlow Senior Editor “How many of you want to be a lawyer to be wealthy?” Tallahassee civil rights lawyer Tommy Warren asks 88 students attending the Summer for Undergraduates Program at Florida State University College of Law.Six hands shoot up.“How many of you want to be a lawyer to be famous?”Three hands rise.“How many of you want to be a lawyer to be happy?”About half of the students assembled from colleges all over the country hold their hands high.One African-American student gets a laugh when she shouts out that if she is rich and famous, she will be happy.“I can’t fight that logic,” grins Warren, who won the country’s largest employment discrimination class-action settlement against Shoney’s more than a decade ago and is all of the above.But then the FSU alumnus stressed he went to law school not to become rich or famous, but to practice what he believes is right, to enforce laws gained during the civil rights movement, to practice law without compromising his values.Warren said he knows of lawyers who were interested in public interest law while students, but went with high-paying corporate lawyer jobs first, because they had loans to pay off. They vowed to return to public interest law one day.“Guess what? They don’t go back, because once you start down that road, it’s a lot like when you start smoking. It’s really hard to quit once you start,” Warren said. “I have seen so many of our classmates who are not happy with their legal careers today. They don’t like what they have become.”Warren challenged the students to look within their hearts to analyze what kind of lawyers they may want to be.“Go get an internship with a corporation and see how you like it,” Warren suggested. “Test both sides. See how you feel.”His message sunk in with 20-year Eric Quiroz, an English major from Texas A&M in Corpus Christi.“I thought I’d want to be in a corporation — for money and security — until I heard what he said,” Quiroz said. “I think I’m going to reconsider, mainly because of the ability to be content with what you are doing in your business, without compromising your personal beliefs. I never even thought about that before.”Giving these bright minority undergrads from all over the country a chance to check out law school and an opportunity to size up what kind of law they may want to practice are among the goals of this intensive month-long program created in 1992 by FSU College of Law Dean Don Weidner. He is very proud of the program’s success that sets it apart from a half dozen other similar national programs by seizing upon students after their first year of college. The idea, Weidner said, is to grab them early in their college experience and gear students toward future success in law school by focusing on writing and critical thinking before it’s time to take the LSAT for real. The competition to get in the program is great: 555 students applied and 88 were chosen. Weidner said they could fill every slot with Ivy League school students, but he keeps the group diverse with Florida ties, drawing students from about 80 colleges nationwide, hoping many will choose to come to FSU lured by scholarships.“I’m convinced it is very important to reach out to students early in their academic career, to open up that pipeline,” Weidner said. “It sends a signal the law is a very inclusive profession that is welcoming to all people.”With One Florida, one of Gov. Jeb Bush’s first initiatives, Florida state schools are no longer permitted to take race into account in admissions standards.“But we are permitted to make special efforts to recruit historically underrepresented students,” Weidner said. “This program has assumed particular importance in that regard. It also gives us alternative credentialing. In addition to students’ undergraduate grades and LSAT scores, we can look to their performance in the program. We are very interested in tracking their success and encouraging them to apply to our law school.”Some students find out that law school is not for them. Others are inspired to go full speed ahead.“The thing that makes me most proud is to see the students at the end of four weeks not only excited about going to law school—but we demystify the process and they leave with the confidence that they can go out and do this,” said Nancy Benavides, associate dean for student affairs.The month-long program is filled with law classes and legal writing workshops, visits to firms, and Supreme Court oral arguments.Students have a chance to meet with judges, justices, law professors, administrators, alumni, and current students. They take a full-length LSAT exam, and follow-up workshops concentrate on areas where students need improvement.As 29-year-old Lawrence Bryant, studying international affairs at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., said: “It’s actually a smart move on the part of the FSU College of Law itself. As they invite us down here to test-drive law school, they also are test-driving the students who come to see if we are the type of people they would actually like to have in their law school. This gives them a chance to see how we operate. So I think it’s a good thing all the way around.”Of the 486 students who have gone through the program, Benavides said, “a little over 100” have applied to FSU’s law school, and about 30 have actually enrolled here, while others have gone to law school elsewhere, including Duke, University of Florida, Emory, University of Georgia, and Notre Dame. The current minority student enrollment at FSU is 21 percent.The program is funded by grants from the Law School Admissions Council. And thanks to about $3 million in contributions, with a state match, from Jacksonville personal injury attorney Wayne Hogan and his wife Pat, a mental-health counselor, the program was expanded from 60 to 90 students this year.Hogan reaped a rousing standing ovation when he spoke to the students about his climb from a kid living in a trailer in Jacksonville to a member of former Gov. Lawton Chiles’ 11-attorney “Dream Team” who sued the tobacco industry.As students listened with rapt attention, Hogan told of growing up in the segregated South during the civil rights movement.In 1964, Hogan was a junior in high school, when Martin Luther King, Jr., came to St. Augustine and was barred from staying at the motel where Hogan worked as a bellhop.“That helped provide a background in real life. I saw the protests. I saw the state troopers who blocked the sides of the ramp down to the ocean so that no African Americans and others who were here in the civil rights movement could actually go into the ocean on that beach because they were not allowed on that beach at all,” Hogan said.His first exposure to a lawyer was one who came to his ninth-grade civics class.“I don’t remember the full details of what he said to us that day, but I do know that by the time I was beginning to notice things, that it occurred to me, as a kid from a working class background, who wanted to try to accomplish things for people, the practice of law might be that kind of opportunity.”When a student asked a question about the problem of frivolous lawsuits, Hogan turned very serious.“You don’t make any money taking frivolous lawsuits. There is a lot of talk you see in the media from people who want to undermine our system of justice by putting a label on lawsuits as frivolous.. . . “What we need is a system in which a person of no means can walk into a courtroom against a corporation with all the means and stand on equal footing. But it is being seriously challenged by those determined to undermine the Seventh Amendment to the Constitution of the United States and similar provisions of our state constitution: the right to jury trial. There is a determined effort to undermine that, and, in the long run, it will undermine the strength of this country.”As students lined up to ask him questions, Hogan explained why he chose this program for his charitable contribution.“The concept of the program is it introduces students who are looking into what their career options are and gives them the opportunity to come together from all over the country to spend time and learn what it might be like to be in law school, what it might be like to be a lawyer, and to serve people, which is what lawyers are meant to do,” said Hogan.As Quiroz, the English major from Texas, waited for a chance to speak personally with Hogan, he said with a broad smile: “Every day I learn something new. It’s really exciting. Today, I went over to the Supreme Court and heard oral arguments about the Code of Professional Conduct and a death row case. It’s so interesting to see the real legal issues. Most definitely, I am inspired. This experience has given me confidence to go ahead and pursue law as a career. I am going to tell my parents they need to step up with a little more money.”last_img read more

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Deaf ears, blind eyes & dangers that trickle down

first_imgby: Lisa FreemanSometimes it’s easy to turn a blind eye to stuff that’s off in the distance and doesn’t really have a direct impact on you.Too easy, in fact.Then, next thing you know, that thing that was off in the distance lands right on your doorstep.Stuff like Operation Choke Point, Dodd-Frank rules still to be written on bank executive compensation, too big to fail — they’re not directly targeting credit unions, so no need to worry about them, right?“In the financial services environment, there are few things that credit unions don’t need to worry about,” NAFCU’s Carrie Hunt said in a recent interview. “The thing is, you always have to worry about the trickle-down effect.”Look no Further: CFPBHunt suggested looking no further than recent history at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s information requests that are being sent to credit unions and their vendors. “That’s just one small example of an unintended consequence,” she said. continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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2007 SUMMIT COVERAGE: Business recognition of pandemic threat said to be rising

first_img Twelve percent of finance officers were aware of their critical suppliers’ preparedness plans, and only 6% were confident that suppliers would continue to supply them during a pandemic. Also, 29% said pandemic preparation was a concern of senior management, while 64% believed it should be a concern. Evangelides, leader of a pandemic preparedness team at Deloitte, said he recently surveyed human resources executives from about 150 companies, risk executives from 20, and financial executives from about 50. All were Fortune 1,000 companies. However, he said, “One thing that comes out loud and clear is that corporate pandemic preparedness is simply not a CEO or COO [chief executive or chief operating officer] or board-of-directors level topic.” The risk executives recognized the threat but were much less confident about companies’ ability to handle it. Sixty-nine percent said a pandemic is “fairly or highly likely” to occur in the next decade, according to Evangelides. Three quarters (74%) said human resources at their firm would be very or severely affected, and 87% said they were only “somewhat prepared” to handle the effects. More than half of the human resource execs, 52%, said their companies had adequate plans to protect themselves, up from only 14% last year, and 45% said the companies were confident of their ability to manage a pandemic, versus 18% a year ago, Evangelides stated. Feb 5, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Orlando, FL – Corporate America is showing signs of a growing recognition of the threat of an influenza pandemic, but the concern is not yet a major topic in executive suites, according to recent surveys by a business consultant. The human resource officers in particular reported increased recognition of the pandemic threat and were relatively optimistic about their companies’ preparations, he said. Summing up, Evangelides said, “I call the human resources execs optimists. I call the risk execs pessimists. And I call the financial officers outsiders; they’re really not that involved.” “From a human resource perspective, the trend is positive,” he said.center_img Finance executives were somewhat less apt to take pandemic concerns seriously. Evangelides reported. Fifty-one percent regarded a pandemic as a real threat, 33% saw preparedness as a top priority, and 21% thought their company was adequately prepared. He spoke this morning at “Business Preparedness for Pandemic Influenza: Second National Summit,” sponsored by the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), publisher of CIDRAP News. Speaking at a conference on business preparedness, Michael Evangelides, MBA, a principal with Deloitte Consulting LLP, said business executives, especially those in human resources, are reporting a growing awareness of and preparation for the pandemic threat. Seventy-three percent of them said their companies perceive pandemic flu as a real threat, versus 57% in a similar survey last year. Further, 68% said their firms were very concerned about pandemic flu, compared with 43% a year ago. Further, 53% of the risk execs believed their supply chain would be “very or severely affected,” and only 10% saw themselves as well prepared to cope with supply-chain effects. Assessing the overall level of corporate preparedness, he said, “Most companies have a pandemic plan that consists of some kind of communication strategy . . . that could be of some use in a pandemic.” However, “For the most part companies are not prepared to operate in the midst of a pandemic.” “I really believe that pandemic preparedness needs to be a CEO/COO-level item,” he added. But he predicted that it will take one or more of several eventualities to make that happen: increased media attention to the threat, legislaton or regulation requiring a high level of preparedness, shareholder or investor concern, or greater understanding by senior managers of the potential financial impacts.last_img read more

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La Liga to use ‘virtual’ stands and audio for broadcasts

first_imgThe stands will be “virtualized” and will offer to-scale images of seated fans wearing the home club’s colors. La Liga collaborated with Norwegian company VIZRT on the technology.”In moments when the game is stopped, this image of fans can be transformed into a canvas that matches the color of the home team and will carry institutional messages among other offerings,” added the league.The virtual sound has been developed with video game company EA SPORTS FIFA, in a project called Sounds of the Stands.”Through this, the audio library of LaLiga official sponsor EA, which was recorded in real stadiums, has been used and has been digitally adapted so that it can be implemented in real time during the match,” said the statement. La Liga will use virtual images of stands in television broadcasts with added ‘fan audio’, produced by the makers of the FIFA video game, when it returns to action on Thursday.Domestic broadcasters in Spain will offer their viewers the choice of a ‘natural’ broadcast of games played behind closed doors with no fans but the international audience will receive only the enhanced broadcasts with added audio and graphics.La Liga said in a statement on Sunday that the use of technology “will allow matches to be seen in an attractive way that closely resembles how they looked and sounded before the competition was postponed.” Topics :center_img “It will be adapted to the flow of the game as certain situations occur, such as a goal or a foul, creating what is known as Atmospheric Audio.”Barcelona lead the table by two points over Real Madrid with 11 rounds of matches left, after the season was paused in March due to the novel coronavirus pandemic, and the two rivals are braced for one of the tightest title races in recent memory.The fight for Champions League football is even closer, with at least five teams vying for third and fourth place.The restart begins with Thursday’s derby between Sevilla and Real Betis, while champions Barcelona visit Real Mallorca on Saturday and Real Madrid host Eibar on Sunday.“We have made these broadcasting changes so fans can enjoy LaLiga,” said the legaue’s President Javier Tebas.“We work with global partners to offer a great viewer experience. We are in an exceptional situation, but for us it has been important to be able to adapt and offer a compelling, cutting-edge broadcast to our fans,” he added. last_img read more

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The outer ring ‘mini-CBD’ estate visited by koalas

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59With bushland access and views, it is probably not surprising that koalas find their way into the backyard of this sprawling estate.But what might surprise you is where it is located. This five-bedroom, five-bathroom home is located on a sprawling 1893sq m in Upper Mount Gravatt, a suburb considered one of the most important business centres outside of the Brisbane CBD, or even the city’s outer ring ‘mini-CBD’. MORE NEWS: Huge riverside apartment project revealed This sprawling estate at 29 Prenzler St in Upper Mount Gravatt is often visited by koalasOwned by Louise Morton and her family for nearly 20 years, it was also previously home to the founder and CEO of Place Estate Agents, Damian Hackett.“We were pregnant with our third child at the time and while we were happy enough where we were, we were also looking for a place with space to bring up children,” Ms Morton said.“Actually, dad’s brother lived in Prenzler Street and that’s the only reason we knew about the area because it’s a quiet enclave that you wouldn’t drive through unless you knew about it.”Smitten by the location, the double allotment and the fact they could never be built out, the Morton’s knew almost immediately they had found the right place in which to raise their three children. The property came with the original house, built in 1973, and the couple lived in it for a few years while working out how to best configure it. They completed a major renovation in 2007.“The bones of the old house are there but we’ve added a whole new pavilion, a kid’s retreat, a stunning gourmet kitchen with butler’s pantry and plenty of living spaces,” Mrs Morton said.“A lot of love went into designing this home and it’s been renovated in such a way that someone can put their own unique touch on it.” Michael Matusik lists Brisbane acreage home High-end features include remote controlled blinds, automatic entry gates, Vac-Maid, under-bench wine fridges, an intercom and security system, a 25,000-litre water tank and secure parking for five cars.The property has direct access to Toohey Forest Reserve and its walking tracks and is separated from its neighbours by the tennis court and a manicured hedge.“We created a space so everyone could gather at our place and they did and it’s been truly wonderful, but now it’s someone else’s turn to enjoy it,” Mrs Morton said.center_img Soaring ceilings deliver a sense of grandeur and there is 712sq m of living space in the house with the first floor dedicated to entertaining areas and the kitchen. A large deck overlooks the pool, tennis court and greater Brisbane area.The five bedrooms are upstairs, three have built-in wardrobes and are serviced by one bathroom and one bedroom has a walk-in wardrobe and ensuite. The master bedroom looks across Mount Gravatt outlook and has an oversized walk-in wardrobe that leads into a luxury ensuite with a freestanding bath and double shower. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus10 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market10 hours ago Mrs Morton said house had served her family well but their children had now finished school, and while they still lived with them, they didn’t need the space so had built a new home in Holland Park with four bedrooms and a lift. “We renovated this house so it’s large enough for everyone to have their own privacy but also so it’s easy for everyone to gather together. We don’t need a tennis court now and all those things that are best suited to families with younger children,” she said.“It feels like you could be living in the middle of nowhere yet you’re only five minutes from the South East Freeway and Garden City is on your doorstep.” ‘Starter house’ in million-dollar suburb gone in 60 secondslast_img read more

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Damen: Unconventional Coastal Protection Project in Israel

first_imgImage source: DamenDamen recently delivered their DOP dredge pump as a complete turnkey package to Israel, for a unique coastal protection project. The DOP doing the job is a DOP200 fitted out with a jet water assisted leveler head. It will mine sand at a max depth of -7m.“The discharge distance to the geotubes varies between 200m and 500m, which the DOP can bridge effortlessly, doing some 800m³/h of mixture per hour,” Damen said.The submersible dredge pump was installed on a work boat.A dedicated A-frame has been made to handle the dredge pump and to put is fully overboard when mining sand. On the work boat the hydraulic power pack and jet water pack are located on deck.Unconventional coastal protection projectEverywhere around the world coasts are under constant attack of the continuous wave action.To protect the Israeli coastline near Mediterranean cost, a series of breakwaters will be constructed.These breakwaters will be somewhat unconventional: no concrete structures, but geotubes filled with sand.A geotube is a textile sleeve which is filled with sand mined locally by the DOP200.The geotubes, of 660m³ each, will be positioned carefully to reduce the wave forces offshore before they reach the coast line thus preventing erosion.Image source: Damenlast_img read more

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Kenyan immigrant attacked in US for speaking Swahili

first_imgAsma Mohamed Jama, Courtesy of New York Daily A Kenyan immigrant was reportedly brutally attacked in Minnesota for speaking in Swahili while dining with her family at a restaurant.Asma Mohamed Jama was taken to hospital where she needed 17 stitches for deep cuts on her nose, eyelid and lip after another woman smashed her face with a beer mug because she was not speaking English but Swahili.According to court documents obtained by the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Burchard-Risch heard Jama speaking a language that wasn’t English while dining with her husband. She then started yelling at the family, even tossing a drink onto Jama and “roundhouse punching” the glass in her face all while he restaurant’s staff tried to escort her out of the establishment.“I live in America. I can speak English but we prefer to speak our own language,” Jama said. “If it bothers you, I’m sorry,” Jama told WCCO-TV.According to the New York Daily, Burchard-Risch was charged with third-degree assault.last_img read more

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