Notre Dame law professor acquitted of misdemeanor invasion of privacy charge

first_imgA jury of six heard the case, but Manier granted Wruble’s motion for a direct verdict that found Smith not guilty, the Tribune reported. Notre Dame criminal law professor Stephen Smith was acquitted of a misdemeanor charge of invasion of privacy in St. Joseph Superior Court on Wednesday, according to a report from the South Bend Tribune. An Indiana State Police trooper arrested Smith after he pulled the vehicle over and discovered the no contact order. According to court records, the case is scheduled to go to trial in September, even though a judge threw out the traffic stop and evidence stemming from it. The Tribune reported that Manier wrote in March that the trooper did not have “reasonable suspicion to believe the defendant was speeding.” Tags: law professor, misdemeanor charge, St. Joseph Superior Court, Stephen Smith According to the Tribune report, Smith also faces another pending charge of invasion of privacy allegedly in violation of the same no contact order. In that case, court documents allege that Smith was riding in a car with his wife while the no contact order was in effect, the Tribune report stated. On March 21, the Indiana Court of Appeals upheld a ruling that Smith will not face the felony charge of domestic battery because the state failed to compile its case in time. He still faces a misdemeanor count of battery against his son, alleged in the same June 2011 incident, the Tribune reported. He is expected to appear in court for a hearing on that charge later this month. Court documents alleged that Smith went to his wife’s residence while the protective order was in place, but his attorney, Stan Wruble, said he drove there to pick up his children. Prosecutors accused Smith of violating a no contact order put into place after the state charged him with felony battery of his wife, but Judge Jenny Manier ruled a jury did not have evidence in order to convict, the Tribune reported.last_img read more

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Students look ahead to March for Life 2019

first_imgWhen senior Matt Connell looks back on his previous experiences at the March for Life, one of the most poignant moments occurs every year toward the end of the March on Constitution Avenue. Passing the Capitol Building, as the road slopes upwards towards the steps of the Supreme Court, he recalls turning around at the top of the hill in awe of the seemingly endless stream of marchers behind him, all bearing witness to the pro-life movement.“There is no way you can feel alone in the pro-life movement after experiencing that,” Connell, vice president of communications for the executive board of the Right to Life Club, said. “It serves as a reminder of the strength and vitality of the pro-life movement in our nation, and it is a sign of hope that we will ultimately build a culture of life that respects all life, including the unborn.”This Friday, Connell, along with around 850 Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students, faculty and staff, will again make the journey to Washington D.C. to participate in the 46th annual March for Life.Notre Dame Right to Life — the largest club on campus — organizes the trip each year with support from the de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture. The Right to Life club also offers a variety of pro-life events throughout the year, Connell said, including group prayer services and service events, which include free babysitting for graduate students with children, educational lectures about the pro-life movement and more.“There’s a lot of really serious attacks on life in our nation and around the world, chief among them abortion,” Connell said. “It’s really important to bear witness to the dignity to every human life and remind people what a gift it is to have life.”This year, 16 buses will depart from campus Thursday night, senior and March for Life team coordinator of the Right to Life club Dan Lindstrom said. Due to a predicted snowstorm, all buses will leave D.C. on Friday night and return to campus Saturday morning.The annual trip to the March for Life is the largest student event on campus. Lindstrom said that the group is encouraging 2019 attendees to think of the trip as a pilgrimage.“It’s really uncomfortable,” Lindstrom said. “Bussing through the night twice and staying on a parish gym floor isn’t glorious. Officially giving it the title of pilgrimage gives people the right direction for how they should view what they’re doing.”Lindstrom said he hopes that students on the March will experience a spiritual awakening in spreading the pro-life message.“Giving it the more spiritual aspect, the goal is to open hearts,” Lindstrom said. “It’s not only opening the hearts of pro-choice people, it’s to open the hearts of the people on the March too.”In addition to students, around 75 Notre Dame faculty and staff will be in attendance at the March, including University President Fr. John Jenkins. Jenkins will march with the Notre Dame cohort and preside over a mass for Notre Dame affiliated marchers on Friday morning at St. Agnes Parish in Arlington, Virginia.Petra Farrell, who has served as the culture of life program manager at the de Nicola Center since 2017, said that the center offers transportation reimbursement and assistance with lodging for faculty, staff or graduate students who wish to attend the march.The number of student participants fluctuates throughout the years, Farrell said, but the record for attendees was set in 2018 with over 1,000 Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross student participants.The theme of the 2019 March for Life is “Unique from day one: pro-life is pro-science,” which Farrell, Connell and Lindstrom all believe fits very well with Notre Dame’s identity as a Catholic University.“A lot of people often think of the pro-life movement as a really religious movement, and sure, there are a lot of religious people within the movement, but it’s not only animated by the religious background of its members but also by science, by reason, by philosophy and all sorts of disciplines that go into creating a holistic view of the pro-life position,” Connell said.“Science does show that life begins at conception,” junior Morgan Chichester, president of the on-campus pro-life group Belles for Life, said.Chichester acted as a promoter and liaison between the Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame groups in order to ensure that Belles were present on the March.“I am very passionate about being pro-life and understanding the real reasons, and how to argue with someone who is pro-choice. [It] is very important and I feel like you learn a lot of information by going on a trip like this,” College freshman Rachel Ledyard said. “I also feel like there is power in numbers and it is amazing how many people show up to events like this and how moving that is.”Freshman Keely Carney will be joining her on the trip but for less analytical and more passionate reasons.“I feel like there is a flame or a candlestick inside my heart about this and I want to ignite that flame and light it, so that I am so passionate and so on fire for it that this something that I can truly strongly stand up for for the rest of my life because it is something that I believe in,” Carney said.The students planning to go shared emotions of excitement and empowerment. Chichester wanted to provide an avenue for girls to express their political, religious and moral opinions.“I am excited that girls want to take a stand on this and I hope that it makes change,” Chichester said.The March for life Rally, which proceeds the march itself, takes place at the National Mall and features speeches by politicians and activists.“At the March you will hear testimonies from people who either went through an abortion and figured out that that was not the right decision or people who said no to that and really went after life,” Chichester said.Chichester sees the pro-life stance as not only protecting those in the womb, but all people facing undignified and vulnerable lives in today’s world.“This is shining a light on the issue of abortion, but is also promoting the beauty and dignity of life to be valued. It is shining a light on it, it’s getting people together to create change whether that is legislatures or just in people’s hearts,” she said.The students attending the March for Life are fulfilling the Saint Mary’s core values, especially justice, Chinchester said.“We are fighting for justice for those who do not have a voice. That is something that Saint Mary’s stands for the vulnerable the marginalized,” Chichester said.Throughout the weekend, speakers for the program include both Republican and Democratic congressmen, in addition to former Planned Parenthood director Abby Johnson, Ben Shapiro and Archbishop Joseph Naumann, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops pro-life committee, among others.“As one of the most reputed institutions of higher learning that’s Catholic, I think we have an obligation to show how much Catholic teaching and reason fit with one another,” Lindstrom said.For students unable to attend the March for Life in D.C., a prayer service organized by the Alumni Association will be held at the Grotto at 12:30 p.m. on Jan. 28.Editor’s note: A previous version of this article incorrectly stated where the March for Life begins. The march starts on Constitution Avenue between 12th and 14th Streets and ends at the Supreme Court.Tags: 2019 March for Life, ND Right to Lifelast_img read more

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University announces 2019-2020 leprechaun lineup

first_imgThe leprechaun lineup for the 2019-20 school year has been determined the “most diverse roster” ever, the Notre Dame cheerleading program announced Tuesday.Junior Samuel Jackson and sophomores Conal Fagan and Lynnette Wukie will all act as the University’s mascot for the upcoming year, ringing in the most diverse group since the leprechaun became the official mascot in 1965.Jackson and Wukie will be the second and third African Americans to hold the role, and Wukie will become the University’s first female leprechaun.Fagan, who is from Derry, Northern Ireland, will enter his second season in the job.“Each bring their own strengths and personalities to the role, and I’m excited to see them represent Notre Dame on the sidelines next season,” head cheerleading coach Delayna Herndon said in the release. “As such a visible representative of Notre Dame, the leprechaun is a role model to fans across the country, and we hope this group can inspire people of all backgrounds to see themselves as a vital part of the Notre Dame family.”Jackson, a native of Alabama and a resident of Keough Hall on campus, said Mike Brown — Notre Dame’s first African American leprechaun and current regional director for athletics advancement — and his history with the role prompted his interest.“When I first came here, I was a big Notre Dame fan, but I didn’t have the history or legacy that my friends did,” Jackson said in the release. “Being able to make my own experiences and memories here at this University and to be able to represent it — especially as a senior — is just the best feeling. I feel like I have solidified my presence and voice, and am now etching it into the very fabric of the University.”Fagan, during his time as a 2018-19 mascot, has helped cheer on a wide variety of sports and accompanied the women’s basketball team to the Final Four. A resident of St. Edward’s Hall on campus, Fagan was a walk-on for the Irish men’s soccer team before taking on the role of being the leprechaun during his sophomore year. As the first native Irishman to hold the job, Fagan said he was unsure how excited he would be in the job at first because mascots and cheerleading are not a part of the culture in Ireland.“I’m really honored to be back,” Fagan said in the release. “When I first took up the leprechaun role, I didn’t know how much I would be excited by it and invested in it because back home mascots and cheerleading isn’t really a thing. Coming here and experiencing it first-hand is such a special thing to me and I think people can see that as well. Every time I put the suit on, it feels like I’m Superman or something, so it’s pretty special.”A sophomore in Pasquerilla West Hall and an Ohio native, Wukie said she has a “need to lead.” The release said Wukie recognized her potential status as a role model since she would be the first female leprechaun.“I talked about being a role model (during the tryout process) because even through high school and into college, it’s always been important to me to be someone people can look up to,” Wukie said in the release. “I think I hadn’t (yet) found that thing, like I wasn’t fulfilling my true purpose here to be that face and that role model, so when this opportunity came about I thought it was destiny. This is what I’m meant to be doing. … My rector told me, ‘Little girls are going to want to be you,’ so to be that role model for young women is really special.”Tags: Diversity, football, Leprechaun lineup, Notre Dame leprechaunlast_img read more

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Lakewood Pizza Hut Permanently Closes Following COVID-19 Shutdown

first_imgImage by Justin Gould / WNY News Now.LAKEWOOD – The Jamestown area Pizza Hut that closed earlier this year due to the COVID-19 shutdown will not reopen.A Pizza Hut spokesperson announced Wednesday that the local franchisee decided to permanently close all 17 dine-in restaurants in Western New York, including the Dunkirk location.Officials say this is the result of the initial temporary closing of Pizza Huts because of COVID-19 restrictions.“Pizza Hut has new franchisees coming into the New York region, and we are hopeful we will be able to serve our customers in this area again in the future,” the spokesperson told WIVB News 4. Here is a list of the stores that have closed:Several Pizza Hut restaurants temporally closed in April after reporting slow business because of a state mandate that shuttered indoor seating. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Broadway Balances America Goes Behind the Scenes of The Sound of Music Tour

first_img Broadway Balances America View Comments The hills (and your screens) are alive with The Sound of Music! Broadway Balances America, the special six-part series airing on The Balancing Act on Lifetime Television, returned on December 1 with a special look at the new tour of Rodgers + Hammerstein’s The Sound of Music, helmed by Tony winner Jack O’Brien. Correspondent Amber Milt speaks with the director and the cast—including newcomer Kerstin Anderson as Maria and Ben Davis as Captain von Trapp—about the beloved musical and how they’ve revitalized it for modern audiences. Click play!last_img read more

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Bridge #9 on Route 9 in town of Bennington closed to one lane

first_imgThe Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) announced Thursday evening that bridge #9 on Route 9, in the Town of Bennington, just past Barney Road heading east, has been closed to one lane of traffic after bridge inspectors determined there was scouring of one of the supporting piers.  VTrans has been conducting additional rounds of bridge inspections after debris has been removed and some of these inspections are revealing additional damage to the bridges.  ‘The bridge inspector advised that we close the bridge to one lane due to the scouring that they found, so we are closing the east lane of the bridge until repairs can be made,’  said Rich Tetreault, VTrans Chief Engineer.  ‘We are inspecting bridges throughout the affected areas as necessary to ensure the safety of the traveling public, which may mean multiple inspections on the same bridge as conditions change,’ continued Tetreault. This particular bridge had a lot of debris piled up against one of the piers.  Once this debris was removed, underwater bridge inspectors were able to provide a comprehensive inspection of the pier.  Some scouring was detected and to ensure the safety of the public, VTrans closed the bridge to one lane starting Thursday evening.  Signals will be installed on either side of the bridge for traffic control and repairs to the bridge could take four weeks or longer.    VTrans. 9.29.2011last_img read more

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Tokyo to pay nightclubs to close as virus cases surge

first_imgTokyo unveiled plans Thursday to offer nightclubs subsidies to close as new coronavirus infections in the capital hit a single-day record, with many linked to entertainment districts.Under the plan, the Tokyo metropolitan government will give 500,000 yen (US$4,660) to nightclubs and other venues — including so-called host and hostess bars — if they close for more than 10 days, local media reported.Host and hostess bars offer guests the opportunity for flirtatious conversation with attractive companions, alongside high-priced drinks. The bars are often used by businessmen to entertain clients.Kaori Kohga, head of the industry association representing hostesses and clubs, gave the announcement a lukewarm reception.”It’s a good start,” she told AFP, “but 500,000 yen per club is not sufficient to curb the cases in these districts.”Money may only go to clubs, not individual hostesses,” she added. “I’m afraid that the effect of the proposed subsidies may be limited.” The measures came after a fresh surge in coronavirus cases in Tokyo, particularly in the capital’s major commercial and entertainment districts, including famed Shinjuku.Tokyo said the number of new coronavirus infections reached a single-day record of 224 on Thursday.”The number of cases related to night-time districts played a role to a certain extent,” Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike said.”We need to be on further alert,” she added.Despite the record number and recent rises in cases, the government has said there is no need to reimpose restrictions and spokesman Yoshihide Suga said plans to further loosen rules on mass gatherings would go ahead on Friday.From tomorrow, baseball stadiums will be able to admit 5,000 spectators — or 50 percent capacity, whichever number is smaller.But fans are expected to be asked to wear masks, wash their hands frequently and avoid shouting.Japan has had a relatively small coronavirus outbreak, with just over 20,000 recorded cases and a total of 981 deaths.In April, a spike in infections prompted Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to declare a nationwide state of emergency, handing Tokyo and other regional governors the power to ask people to stay indoors and call for businesses to close.Abe lifted the emergency declaration in late May as the outbreak appeared to slow, but said it would take “quite a long time” for the country to fully return to normal.The epidemic has already forced a one-year delay to the summer Tokyo Olympics, and caused the suspension of activities ranging from sumo to a summer high-school baseball tournament — an enormously popular event that receives extensive television coverage.Topics :last_img read more

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Metricon’s latest display home more mansion-like than house

first_imgThe display home stands out from the street. Coast house sparks bidding war Cupcake queen’s sweet deal The kitchen with the wet bar and wine fridges. Metricon’s Queensland general manager Peter Ryan said The Riviera 65 showed what could be achieved with a knockdown and rebuild rather than renovating.“With the Gold Coast having a shortage of prime vacant land, it makes sense to rebuild the home of your dreams,” he said.The interior of the home features an open-plan kitchen with a butler’s pantry and the dining room has its own wet bar with two wine fridges. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa15 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoA sense of luxury at every turn. The dining area opens out to the outdoor entertaining area. The Riviera 65 display home, built by Metricon.GONE are the days when display homes consist of a basic floorplan and three bedrooms.Metricon Homes’ latest design, at Sorrento, is more mansion-like than house with luxury fittings and fixtures, a pool, theatre, wet bar and two wine fridges among its inclusions. Clive Palmer settles $12 million beach house The indoor living area opens up with bi-fold doors to an outdoor entertaining area that overlooks a pool, gazebo and waterfront.Upstairs there are four bedrooms and a theatre room.Metricon design director Adrian Popple said the bespoke design was all about luxury living, yet also provided a relaxing space to live and entertain.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59last_img read more

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Carl Broughton, 74

first_imgCarl Broughton, age 74 of New Trenton, IN passed away on Tuesday, November 15, 2016 at the Hickory Creek Nursing Home in Greensburg, IN.  Born October 8, 1942 in Barboursville, KY he was the son of Lee & Eller (Smith) Broughton.Carl graduated from Sunman High School, served in the National Guard, was a machinist at Cincinnati INC and a farmer.  He married Joan Linda (Stephens) Broughton on May 22, 1965 and she preceded him in death.  He attended Faith Baptist Church.Carl is survived by his son Tim Broughton (Denise) of Bright, IN and daughter Michelle Roberts-Schneider (Drew) of Brookville, IN.  He will also be missed by his grandchildren Adam Broughton (Kayleigh), Nate Broughton, Kendra Roberts & Taylor Roberts along with his siblings Randy Broughton (Phyllis) of Delaware, IN; Buford Broughton (Karen) of Dallas, TX; Jay Broughton (Sharon) of Shelbyville, IN; Charlie Broughton (Lovetta) of Sunman, IN and Delora Lawrence (Ed) of Indianapolis, IN and his beloved buddy Shadow.  In addition to his parents and wife, he was preceded in death by his siblings Russell, LeRoy, Josie, Viola, Bill & Oda.Visitation will be Friday, November 18, 2016 from 5-8pm at Jackman Kercheval Meyers Funeral Home, Harrison, OH.  Funeral Services will be Saturday, November 19, 2016 at 11am at the funeral home with Brother Ronnie Wolfe officiating.  Burial will follow services at Gibson Cemetery in Bright, IN.  Memorials are suggested to American Cancer Society or Bear & Friends Animal Society, Inc., c/o Jackman Kercheval Meyers Funeral Home, P.O. Box 513, Harrison, OH  45030.  Online condolences at www.jkmfuneralhome.com.last_img read more

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Name least of ‘Ike’s’ worries

first_imgWith a last name like his, Jack Ikegwuonu has heard every pronunciation under the sun.”I can’t even remember them all, they’re so outlandish,” the sophomore defensive back said. “Everybody calls me ‘Ike’ because they don’t want to worry about pronouncing my last name.”In fact, some of his coaches still have trouble with it.”To be honest with you, I don’t think I’ve ever pronounced his last name,” joked defensive backs coach Kerry Cooks. “His first name is Jack. The only name that I give him is Ike.”Everybody butchers it, so I don’t even try.”Although it may be difficult for people to say his name (for the record, it’s ike-uh-GWAN-new), it has been rather easy to see the impact he has made on the football field in his second season with the team.With three interceptions as a freshman last season, Ikegwuonu has carried over his strong play into this year, including an interception against Michigan.”We wanted him to come in and give him little baby steps [last year],” Cooks said. “I think the experience he gained from playing last year is what makes him so confident now. He’s seen the speed of the game, and he’s starting to understand better what the offenses are trying to do in different offensive formations.”Ikegwuonu has also grown to realize that individual stats are not the most important thing.”You always try to just do one better from last year,” Ikegwuonu said. “I think success isn’t always measured in terms of interceptions. I think [it’s measured by] what you contribute to the defense, and what you force the offense to do in terms of your presence on the field. That’s what I’m trying to do right now.””He studies his opponents,” safety Roderick Rogers said. “He’s studying film and getting smarter in terms of the game.”As hard working as he is, Ikegwuonu is an equally good teammate.”He’s a good kid,” Cooks added. “He comes from a well-respected family and he’s a ‘yes sir, no sir’ type of kid. He’ll do anything in the world for his team and for his teammates.”A three-sport athlete in high school, Ikegwuonu was able to hone his athletic skills from his other two sports, baseball and basketball, to make him a better football player.”Every sport has its little elements that you need to be good at to be successful in that given sport,” he said. “It’s kind of nice coming from a three-sport athlete to be able to specialize in one, because in high school you had so many things to do. Now you can specialize and focus on it.”As another testament to his natural athleticism, Ikegwuonu played on both the offensive and defensive side of the football in high school.”I think a lot of young kids want to play offense, want to be the guy that scores the touchdowns (and) want to be the guy that’s in the limelight all the time,” Ikegwuonu said. “I thought that my opportunity was going to be on defense because I felt that if I did well on defense, that’s where I’d be most successful.”Athleticism runs in the Ikegwuonu family, too. Jack’s twin brother, Bill, plays as defensive back for Northern Illinois. There is no sibling rivalry between the Ikegwuonu brothers there.”Oh, no, definitely not,” Jack said. “He’s always supportive, and I’m always supportive of him. All he wants to do is see me do well. He’s such a great brother. I couldn’t ask for a better one because he’s so supportive.”Even though Ikegwuonu says football is not the only thing in his life, he admits that family conversations often revolve around the game.”That’s all we talk about,” he said. “We’re a football family. It’s a game we love.”Despite all the success he and the Badgers have enjoyed this year, including the Big Ten’s top-ranked pass defense, Ikegwuonu knows the team must stay humble and keep doing what they have been doing.”I think we’ve got to forget about all those statistics,” he said. “We’ve got to keep those out of our heads. Games aren’t played on paper. We just gotta do the little things right that we’ve been doing and just go out there and play.”As Ikegwuonu and the Badgers’ defense continues their strong play the rest of the season, listen for his name being called over the loudspeaker, whether it is “ick-uh-gu-nu,” “iguano” or just plain Ike, but don’t worry about the pronunciation. After all, his game speaks for itself.last_img read more

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