Setting the agenda

first_img Previous Article Next Article Having a diversity policy is just the first step in a long-term process thatwill bring benefits to any organisation. Jane Lewis finds out how the RoyalMail Group and Nike EMEA are going about making their workplaces more equalWhen Henry Ford launched the first formal diversity programme in 1913 andbegan to hire black, immigrant and disabled staff, he was branded a utopiancrank with socialist tendencies that bordered on the anarchic. Times have certainly changed. The concept of diversity in the workplace –incorporating different personalities, sexualities, religions and educationalbackgrounds, as well as race, age, ability and gender – is now so far advancedthat in most quarters, it is regarded as a prerequisite for success. But the question clearly bedevilling HR professionals trying to get a gripon this most slippery of policies, is where to begin. This may explain why sofew organisations in the UK have taken active steps to tackle it – despitepaying lip service to the ideal. The first step for many is to focus minds by appointing a director ofdiversity. That was certainly the step taken by the Royal Mail Group when ithired Satya Kartara for the job last year. Diversity appointments are usually driven by two hard-nosed considerations:maximising the business opportunity and managing risk – both in terms ofcomplying with legislation and safeguarding reputation. For the beleagueredRoyal Mail – still losing £1m a day and reeling from an aggressive machoculture that culminated in the tragic suicide of an employee – the situationwas clearly pressing. To make matters worse, last December the Royal Mail’s much-vaunted newbroom, chairman Allan Leighton, was forced to counter accusations from formermanaging director of mail markets Gillian Wilmot that he had turned the groupinto a ‘boys’ club’. “I’m not blaming anyone,” says Wilmot, who lost out on promotionin a boardroom shake-up, “but it would have been nice to have a crack atthe job, and there should have been open competition.” Leighton, however,dismisses her allegations as “utter rubbish”. Kartara clearly has her work cut out. Fortunately, she comes with animpeccable pedigree. Having cut her teeth at Ford, she then became director ofchange at BHS – the high street retailer transformed by owner Philip Green, inunder 20 months, from an ailing £200m company to one now valued at more than£1bn. While her remit at the Royal Mail is clearly very different, Kartara saysshe will be importing many of the practices and processes that were employed atBHS to such good effect. Underpinning everything is a four-point renewal strategy. “And right atthe top of that is our determination to make the Royal Mail a great place towork,” says Kartara. Once you get the people issues right, she argues,bottom line considerations – such as creating efficiencies, and improvingcashflow and profitability – will follow automatically. In many ways, the Royal Mail’s situation is typical of a number oforganisations across the public and private sectors – albeit on a larger scale.Currently employing some 220,000 staff, of which some 10 per cent are classedas ethnic minorities, Kartara says: “We are fairly diverse already. Butthat diversity is concentrated in certain areas, such as London and parts ofthe North. I would like it to be reflected at all levels across theorganisation. The Royal Mail is one of the last great British institutions; wewant the best people – and they come from all walks of life.” Like every diversity expert, she too deplores the notion of quotas, arguingthat they are not only illegal, but also counter-productive. As Jon Whiteley, head of diversity at occupational psychologists PearnKandola, points out: “The very idea of quotas is negative and it hackspeople off. You have to make it clear that what you are after is anorganisation that is a meritocracy: that the best people for the job will beselected for a position. “Achieving diversity clearly involves targets, but the important thingis the activity underneath that – not the target itself.” Many organisations, he adds, find it politic to prevent even these”aspirational targets” from becoming common knowledge. The real challenge for Kartara, then, is to identify the kind of culturalbarriers that might be preventing wider groups from taking up jobs with theRoyal Mail – and to remove any impediments deterring those already employedfrom seeking and achieving promotion. The first step in the strategy is to audit how the organisation presentlyviews itself. “A model we used at BHS – a rolling monthly attitude survey– was a great way to take a temperature check on how people were feeling, andit turned out to be one of the most important documents in theorganisation.” Given the Royal Mail’s particular history, she has put forward a number ofquestions relating to harassment and bullying. Indeed, the ‘Dignity at Work’initiative she has pioneered gets straight down to brass tacks. “We’ve recognised that we have a culture of bullying in theorganisation – though I would make it clear this is only by a minority – andthis makes clear that we will not tolerate it. We want people to come to workand feel they’re being respected and valued.” To give the initiative teeth, she has introduced an independent helpline,whose advisers have been trained not just to listen, but to help peopleinitiate formal complaints where necessary. These are still early days for the Royal Mail’s Renewal Strategy. But in thebattle to establish greater diversity, one thing Kartara has on her side is thesenior managers’ committed ownership of the policy, from the chairman down. Sheplans to build on this by recruiting senior diversity champions at differentlevels in the business, such as board members, managing directors and area managers– to “promote, support and drive the strategy”. “You don’t achieve these things overnight,” Kartara says.”This is a long-term challenge, but I wouldn’t have taken the job if Ididn’t think it was possible. Diversity cannot just be a sideline; it must beat the heart of everything we do.” For all the challenges Kartara faces at the Royal Mail, she did at leasthave one thing on her side – introducing the diversity policy was as much anexercise in crisis management as anything else. But for many companiescurrently chugging along happily enough, the issue of diversity presentsdifferent problems. One of the main problems, says Susy Bobenreith, director oflearning and development at Nike EMEA, is simply defining what is actuallymeant by diversity, let alone the strategies needed to achieve it –particularly when you run an organisation that spans the continents of Europeand Africa. “One thing that was happening was that we were too much indebate-mode,” she says. “We couldn’t come to a place where we couldget any action – it was all too pie in the sky.” In the end the frustration boiled over. “We thought, ‘we’re Nike, weneed to just do it’. So we decided to focus on one thing to act as a catalyst.The issue we could all agree not to argue about was gender.” Overcoming bias Although the gender divide at Nike EMEA is currently 50:50, the companysuffers from the familiar problem that that ratio declines quite dramaticallythe further up the company ranks you go. “We took an audit of the people coming up through the organisation andmeasured men and women per function, per business group and per country,”says Bobenreith. The conclusion she came to, was: “Even if we promoted women at the samerate as men, we didn’t have a [middle management] bench to draw on.” In common with the Royal Mail, Bobenreith decided to tackle the problemobliquely, focusing on creating a culture that would attract and encourage morewomen, rather than going hell for leather for targets. This wasn’t just becauseshe feared a backlash from men; she was also getting pleas from women who didnot want their professional standing damaged by being tarred with the positivediscrimination brush. Clearly, it was a delicate balance to get right. Bobenreith began with measures to even out the playing field, such asintroducing more flexible working times and ensuring that women who left tohave children knew they would be welcomed on their return. Another key focus was transparency in recruitment and promotion. “Wewanted to get away from the belief that you get jobs because you know thepeople who hang around the water cooler.” This meant making managementdecisions transparent and creating a senior management profile, “so thateveryone could see what sort of skills and attributes were necessary”. She also made a point of training managers “to use specific techniquesto check their own biases”. The greatest enemy of diversity, she says, ishuman nature. “It comes naturally to hire people you like – to fall in love with oneparticular characteristic. We needed to teach managers to suspend firstimpressions – or at the very least, to be aware that we all have biases, and tobe able to catch yourself when you’re doing it.” She also made it clear to recruitment companies that Nike wanted to selectfrom a wider, more balanced pool. A year into the initiative, the results are already speaking for themselves.Out of 50 middle management positions up for grabs, 26 women were hired. The gender programme, Bobenreith says, is “just one spoke in thewheel” of making Nike a more diverse company, but its success will help tospearhead and encourage a wider strategy. “Essentially, we want to figure out a [strategic] roof for the companythat will sit over individual countries” – allowing them to tailor thedetail to suit their own particular situations. However, Nike has come a long way from the ‘jock guy’ culture that hastended to dominate at the company since 1971, when it was founded in Beaverton,Oregon, US. Back then, “people weren’t hired for skill sets, but for howfast they could run”. Even as little as five years ago, all generalmanagement positions in Europe were dominated by American men. “Now atleast we have Europeans running the show,” she says. The EMEA diversity programme tunes in with “a subconscious move tobecoming more globally diverse as an organisation” she says. “We’restill grappling with this – we haven’t cracked the nut yet.” But now, there is at least the satisfaction of having made a successfulstart. Katara, Bobenreith and Whiteley will all be speaking at the Pearn KandolaNew Directions in Diversity conference in Newbury on 11 March, being held inassociation with Personnel Today. For more details, visit www.pearnkandola.com Setting the agendaOn 4 Mar 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. 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Howard Rubenstein, press agent who repped stars and real estate elite, dies at 88

first_imgHoward Rubenstein (Getty)Howard Rubenstein, a legendary figure in public relations who represented the power players of New York, died Tuesday in his Manhattan home. He was 88.His lengthy list of clients included real estate firms, celebrities, politicians, corporations and cultural institutions. Among them were Donald Trump, Rupert Murdoch, the late Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, Columbia University, the Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic, according to the New York Times.“I will remember him for his unwavering code of ethics, which earned him the trust of real estate moguls, developers, politicians, and celebrities all over the world,” said Bess Freedman, CEO of Brown Harris Stevens, one of Rubenstein’s clients. “He left an indelible mark on the real estate industry, on New York City, and on the many people he helped along the way.”Rubenstein spoke with a soft voice and strived to do his job with dignity, often preaching ethics in articles and speeches on public relations, the paper reported.“When you have a crisis, you first have to ask, what’s the right thing to do and say?” he told the Times in 1995. “Not what kind of spin can we put on, but what’s the right thing to do. You don’t let the facts dribble out. Sometimes you do it by holding a news conference. Other times you do it with a written statement, depending on how the client feels or the ability of the client to conduct himself or herself in a tough situation.”Read moreEastern Consolidated founder Peter Hauspurg diesGerald Hines, developer who changed Houston’s skyline, dies at 95Jerry Wolkoff, prolific New York developer, dies at 83 Share via Shortlink Rubenstein was born in Brooklyn on Feb. 3, 1932, to Samuel and Ada (Sall) Rubenstein. He graduated from Midwood High School and the University of Pennsylvania, where he majored in economics.Upon dropping out of Harvard Law School after two months, he learned public relations from his father, a journalist, and launched his eponymous firm from his kitchen table in 1954. He earned a law degree from St. John’s University five years later but continued his agency, building it into one of the city’s most prestigious PR shops.He is survived by his wife Amy Forman, along with three children, Roni, Richard, and Steven Rubenstein, and seven grandchildren. David, another child, died in 1971 at the age of nine.[NYT] — Sasha Jones Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink TagsCelebrity Real EstateCommercial Real EstateObituariesResidential Real Estatelast_img read more

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Scoreboard roundup — 11/26/18

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Monday’s sports events:NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONCharlotte 110, Milwaukee 107OT Washington 135, Houston 131Minnesota 102, Cleveland 95San Antonio 108, Chicago 107Boston 124, New Orleans 107Indiana 121, Utah 88Golden State 116, Orlando 110NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEWashington 4, NY Islanders 1NY Rangers 4, Ottawa 2OT Florida 4, New Jersey 3Toronto 4, Boston 2Columbus 7, Detroit 5NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUEHouston 34, Tennessee 17TOP-25 COLLEGE BASKETBALL(1) Gonzaga 102, N. Dakota St. 60Texas Southern 89, (18) Oregon 84(25) Mississippi St. 88, Alcorn St. 65Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Beau Lund Written bycenter_img November 27, 2018 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 11/26/18last_img read more

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Bay Avenue Open for Business During Road Construction

first_imgSigns let motorists know about businesses that remain open during a road construction project on Bay Avenue in Ocean City, NJ.City and business leaders are rallying behind Bay Avenue businesses — the victims of a seemingly endless road construction project.A new campaign encourages people to patronize the businesses between Ninth and 18th streets on Bay Avenue, including:Island Beach Gear (Ninth Street and Bay Avenue)Bongo Café and Grille (1050 Bay Avenue)Mallon’s Sticky Buns (1340 Bay Avenue)Berger Realty (1330 Bay Avenue)Mario’s Pizzeria (1510 Bay Avenue)“Don’t cheat on your favorite place, but visit these businesses,” Councilman Keith Hartzell said at Thursday’s City Council meeting, where the frustrations and challenges of these businesses were a topic of discussion. Access to various parts of Bay Avenue has been blocked for much of the winter and spring.A $3.3 million Cape May County project to improve drainage and repave Bay Avenue between Sixth and 18th streets (read more) began in February and was originally scheduled to be complete before the summer.But the project was delayed by utility work as New Jersey American Water Company (NJAWC) replaced water mains in advance of the repaving project.Work will end in the middle of June and resume in the fall.In the meantime, electronic signs on Ninth Street remind motorists that the businesses are open and direct traffic to use Simpson Avenue for access. Road signs have recently been placed on Bay Avenue at 15th Street listing open businesses.Bay Avenue is open to traffic on weekends when crews are not working.The Ocean City Regional Chamber of Commerce is helping to spread the word through emails to members and Ocean City visitors.last_img read more

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Vogel’s takes breakfast to Bristol commuters

first_imgFollowing the launch of its first UK marketing campaign in July, Vogel’s has taken on the consumer face-to-face with a pop-up toast bar at Temple Meads train station in Bristol.Simon Staddon, managing director of bakers Nicholas & Harris, which holds the Vogel’s licence in the UK, told British Baker that the firm had been “getting a bit of momentum behind the brand”, and that sales of Vogel’s bread had increased by around 40% since the re-launch of the brand this summer.Open on Friday 8 October, the stand, manned by staff from the bakery, featured a row of toasters, a variety of Vogel’s breads, butter and a range of toast toppings. Travellers were invited to stop by and make themselves some breakfast. Staddon said it was the first time the firm had done anything like this and, depending on its success, it would look to repeat the toast bar experience across the country next year. “It’s about getting people to try Vogel’s as toast for breakfast,” he said, “as nine out of 10 slices of Vogel’s are currently used for toast.”Last month its new packaging was rolled out across all product lines, and has had a good response from new and existing customers so far, explained Staddon. Vogel’s has also been developing a fruit and seed loaf, due to launch in January 2011.>>Nicholas & Harris goes to work on Vogel’s brandlast_img read more

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News story: Near miss with track workers at Clapham Junction

first_imgThis item has been moved to the National Archives as RAIB has published its safety digest describing this incident. See safety digest 02/2018.,At around 05:51 hrs on 17 January 2018, an empty coaching stock train was involved in a near miss with three Network Rail workers near Clapham Junction station. Nobody was injured, although the driver and the staff were shaken by the incident.We have undertaken a preliminary examination into the circumstances surrounding this incident. Having assessed the evidence which has been gathered to date, we have decided to publish a safety digest.The safety digest will be made available on our website in the next few weeks.last_img read more

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EAT plans UK expansion

first_imgThe private equity-backed sandwich chain EAT plans to expand beyond London – after securing a further £40m in funding.The company is understood to have secured the backing from Ardian last month and plans to spend £12.5m on growing the brand across the UK.The company is backed by Lyceum Capital and run by new chief executive Adrian Johnson.Johnson told the Financial Times: “The marketplace is still there. It has been tough, but people are coming through it. What people don’t give up [in a downturn] are the low-spend treats.”The coffee shop and sandwich market continues to be buoyant in the UK, and last month EAT’s rival Pret A Manger posted a 15% increase in sales. The high street chain saw sales hit £510m, while underlying profit rose 9% to £67m.last_img read more

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Going where the diversity is

first_imgLast month, two graduate students from the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University traveled to one of the most species-rich landscapes in the world: a remote strip of tropical rainforest at the narrowest point in the Central American country of Panama.Ben Goulet-Scott, a Ph.D. candidate in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology (OEB) and a fellow in the Arboretum’s Hopkins Lab, and Jacob Suissa, OEB Ph.D. candidate in the Friedman Lab at the Arboretum, hope their research in the Mamoní Valley Preserve in Panama will increase our understanding of how biodiversity can persevere in the face of climate change, deforestation, and human disturbance.The 20-square-mile land conservancy on the isthmus separating Central and South America teems with life, making the condensed rainforest habitat a perfect location for their research project because of the vast number of known and potentially undiscovered species living there, Goulet-Scott said.,“New England has twice the land area of Panama, but half the number of bird species, and 10 times fewer reptiles and amphibians,” he said. “This particular location contains species that migrate or move from north to south and get funneled into this very narrow area, concentrating an incredible amount of biodiversity.”The Mamoní Valley Preserve (MVP) Natural History Project is an ongoing series of student-led field expeditions, organized by Goulet-Scott in 2017. The project is designed to establish a baseline understanding of how the different land-use conditions within the preserve — from fully deforested cattle pasture to recovering secondary forest and intact primary forest — affect patterns of diversity.By bringing early career biologists like himself to the site for fieldwork, Goulet-Scott is building a list of species and observations to eventually make available in a central repository for scientists and researchers focused on conservation.,“Identifying every species there is actually probably not possible, but that’s how we think about the mission of these trips,” he said. “By bringing groups of students who have expertise in identifying different types of organisms, we work to document all the different species we see in each type of habitat.”Creating a baseline is vital because it will help determine which areas are of high priority for conserving certain species, and which species might already be threatened.“It’s an interesting exploration,” Goulet-Scott said. “The more frequently we do biodiversity studies, the better we are able to track how conservation is going in this area.”The MVP Natural History Project intrigued Robert Brooker ’89, M.B.A. ’97, who learned about Goulet-Scott’s research and funded this expedition.“I met Ben on a trip there a year ago and was excited about what he was doing and wanted to support it,” said Brooker, the chairman of WIN-911 Software in Austin, Texas. “Ben and his colleagues are very interested in this work and I want to help a group of creative and intelligent students to accomplish whatever they want to accomplish to make the world a better place.”The trip in January was Goulet-Scott’s third expedition for the project. The first, in 2017, included four doctoral students from Harvard, with a taxonomic focus on reptiles and amphibians. During the second trip in 2018, seven Harvard Ph.D. students and one from the University of Texas collected data on insects, specifically butterflies and moths.,This year’s team — two Harvard Ph.D. students, one Harvard undergraduate, a Ph.D. student from the University of Utah, and three undergraduates from the University of Panama — investigated ferns, the second-most-diverse lineage of vascular plants behind flowering plants. Ferns are a focal point for Suissa, who investigated an ancient lineage of fern relatives as a research technician at the Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. At Harvard he studies the evolution of the water transport system in ferns, which is a building block for the downstream analysis of climate change.“Studying ferns in locations like the preserve furthers our understanding of global patterns of biodiversity and can help inform conservation practices in the future,” he said. “We need to know what is where in order to protect it.”Suissa has done fieldwork in Costa Rica four times, but this was his first time in Panama, where there may be as many as 700 different species of plant in a 100 square kilometer region. He said this intense diversity in such a small space is an important educational opportunity for students studying tropical biology. Survey findings from each MVP expedition are also used to create educational materials such as field guides and brochures for the preserve, as well as for youth environmental education.Christian Lopez, a graduate student in botany from the University of Panama, said he appreciated being part of this MVP Natural History Project expedition, on which he was able to find species he had never previously seen in the wild.,“This collaboration with Harvard University and its doctoral students has been a great learning opportunity for me, and the exchange of knowledge went both ways,” he said.Other team members included Jon Hamilton ’20, environmental science and public policy; Sylvia Kinosian, Ph.D. candidate in biology, Utah State University; and Jose Palacios and Brian Vergara, undergraduate students studying biology at the Universidad de Panama. Goulet-Scott said one of the most exciting things about the MVP Natural History Project is that it is student-run.“There’s no one more experienced than a grad student involved, so it’s all about being self-organized,” he said. “We are in charge of figuring out all the logistics and planning how we’re going to spend our day, what the goals of the trip are, and what equipment we need to bring.”,Conducting field work in the rainforest is not for the weak of body or spirit. Sweltering heat and humidity, unpredictable weather, potential for infection, deadly snakes and spiders, and even the chiggers that burrow into waistbands and armpits can impact the best-prepared researcher. The team traveled in the beds of pickup trucks over unpaved, bumpy roads and through 15 river crossings. One of their trucks slid off of a riverbank and got stuck, partially submerged. Once a fallen tree blocked their passage until they helped local farmers chop it up with machetes.The weeklong expedition included challenging hikes in pouring rain while carrying heavy packs full of equipment and trash bags full of plant specimens. The students hiked up a 900-meter mountain, felt their way through the wet cloud mist of an elfin forest, and bathed in a pristine waterfall. Suissa avoided stepping on a deadly fer-de-lance viper thanks only to one of the local guides. But his first trip to the neotropics as an undergraduate was enough to change the trajectory of his career.,On this expedition, Suissa collected more than 100 fern stems, spanning their evolutionary tree. The group’s efforts yielded 170 specimens and an estimated 160 species, including rare and hybrid ferns and lycophytes — unexpected and exciting findings for the researchers, Goulet-Scott said.Lider Sucre, M.B.A. ’97, CEO of Mamoní 100 (one of the three organizations involved in protecting the Mamoní Valley), said the MVP History Project is a catalyst to bigger and deeper opportunities for the future of global science.“For three years now we’ve been seeing that the Mamoní Valley Natural History Project that Harvard University students have led and been engaged with is an incredibly important part of how we give greater substance to the biodiversity that lives here,” he said. “It is a unique keystone location matched by nothing else, a crossroads to so many lifeforms, and they have been incredibly lucky with their exceptionally rare finds with wildlife that is not usually seen.” Chinese botanists hit trail with Arboretum Related When the trees become the teachercenter_img Boston high schoolers experience hands-on connection to climate change Inaugural expedition marks historic collaborationlast_img read more

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Mary Callanan & Alison Ewing Join Mamma Mia on Broadway

first_img Callanan comes to the Great White Way direct from starring as Rosie in the Las Vegas company and national tour of Mamma Mia! She last appeared on Broadway in the recent revival of Annie. Ewing previously starred as Tanya in the Las Vegas and North American tour of Mamma Mia! She last appeared on Broadway in Cabaret. The Broadway company of Mamma Mia! currently includes Judy McLane as Donna Sheridan, Elena Ricardo as Sophie Sheridan, Paul DeBoy as Harry Bright, John Hemphill as Bill Austin and Jon Jorgenson as Sky. The ABBA extravaganza tells the story of Sophie Sheridan, a young bride who invites three potential dads to walk her down the aisle at her wedding, unbeknownst to her mother, Donna. Directed by Phyllida Lloyd, Mamma Mia! opened October 18, 2001 at the Winter Garden Theatre. The show features music and lyrics by Benny Andersson and Bjorn Ulvaeus and a book by Catherine Johnson. Some new dancing queens begin performances in Broadway’s Mamma Mia! on February 2! Mary Callanan and Alison Ewing take over from Lauren Cohn and Felicia Finley  as Rosie and Tanya, respectively. Cohn and Finley ended their engagements at the Broadhurst Theatre on February 1, along with Alan Campbell, who was playing Sam Carmichael. Victor Wallace will temporarily play the role of Sam, with a new “potential Dad” to be announced shortly. View Commentscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 12, 2015 Related Shows Mamma Mia! last_img read more

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Nathan Lane Will Return to It’s Only a Play on Broadway

first_imgNathan Lane is heading back to It’s Only a Play on the Great White Way! Broadway.com has confirmed that the two-time Tony winner, who left the Terrence McNally comedy to star in Eugene O’Neill’s masterpiece The Iceman Cometh at BAM, will begin performances once again as James Wicker on March 31. Martin Short is set to play his final performance in the role on March 29 at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre. Lane will remain with the production through its scheduled closing date of June 7.A Tony winner for The Producers and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Lane also received Tony nominations for Guys and Dolls and The Nance.It’s Only a Play, directed by Jack O’Brien, is set on the opening night of Peter Austin’s new play as he anxiously awaits to see if his show is a hit. With his career on the line, he shares his big first night with his best friend, a television star, his fledgling producer, his erratic leading lady, his wunderkind director, an infamous drama critic and a wide-eyed coat check attendant on his first night in Manhattan.Along with Short, the production currently stars Matthew Broderick, F. Murray Abraham, Stockard Channing, Katie Finneran, Maulik Pancholy and Micah Stock.The Iceman Cometh concludes its run at BAM on March 15 and rumor has it that the production will be transferring to Broadway—but we now know it won’t be immediately!  Nathan Lane Star Filescenter_img View Commentslast_img read more

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