Business booms as Donegal company tips its hats to Peaky Blinders!

first_imgBusiness at Hanna Hats in Donegal Town is booming with the success of shows like Peaky Blinders.The company says it is now making more than 2,000 caps a week to the United States.The first Hanna Hats were made in 1964 by David Hanna Snr. David had worked in Donegal with a Mr McDaid but then started his own business when Mr McDaid passed away.Hanna had learned his trade after he was reared in Belfast by the Christian Brothers where he would sew on all of their buttons.The company went into liquidation in 1986 but John and Mary Hanna bought the company back in 1991 and it has made steady progress since.Grand-daughter Eleanor Hanna told the Mail on Sunday that shows like Peaky Blinders starring Cillian Murphy are helping business. “Shows like Peaky Blinders have been fantastic. They stock our Sherlock Holmes hat in the BBC catalogue and when the show airs we get huge interest.“The caps are quite trendy now. We took in a designer through the Northwest Regional College. She is helping us with designs and machines.“We are tweaking the products and making them more fashionable,” she said.The company buys its tweeds from various suppliers including Magee which juts happens to be around the corner on The Diamond in Donegal TownBut the oldest cap is still its bestseller. “Our vintage caps is still the bestseller. It would have been the cap that grandad started off with,” added Eleanor.Business booms as Donegal company tips its hats to Peaky Blinders! was last modified: August 11th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:CapsDonegal TownHanna HatsPeaky Blinderslast_img read more

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Zuma named Africa’s best president

first_img12 November 2009South African President Jacob Zuma was named Best African President at the 2009 Africa Consciousness Media Leadership Awards, which honour those who have contributed to the liberation and development of the continent.Speaking at the awards ceremony in Johannesburg on Tuesday, Zuma urged African leaders to keep the promises they had made to their people.“We have pledged to our people that we will strive for the eradication of poverty, disease and conflict. We have pledged to promote trade, investment, economic growth, skills development and stability on the continent.”Zuma called on African leaders to use partnership agreements as instruments to advance the cause of the continent.He was referring to pacts such as African Peer Review Mechanism, established to promote good governance in Africa, and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad), which aims to foster economic integration and development.“If we deviate or if we falter, we expect all of you – ordinary citizens, civil society, academics and the media – to sound the warning bells,” Zuma said. “Good leaders heed these warnings and respond constructively. They do not consider themselves to be above their people.”Miriam MakebaZuma was not the only South African recipient of an award. The late Afro-pop legend Miriam Makeba was given the Great Daughter of Africa award for using music to address the challenges faced by Africans during the colonial era.The Pata-Pata songbird, who was exiled for years after she was banned by the apartheid government, travelled the world not only performing her songs but also sending the message to the world about Africans’ challenges.The late First Lady of Nigeria, Stella Obasanjo, was named Best African First Lady of the Year.Zuma said the awards served as a reminder that nothing could be achieved without the confidence, trust and support of fellow Africans.Leadership ‘about service and sacrifice’“A true leader is guided by the needs and the collective wisdom of his or her people. These awards should therefore not be about status or prestige. They should be about service and sacrifice. Let us work together to ensure that they achieve these goals.”African statesman and former Zambian president Kenneth Kaunda also attended Tuesday’s event. He wished South Africa all the best in hosting a successful footall World Cup in 2010.He said it was Africa’s turn to show the world what she was capable of, adding that he was confident that the tournament would be a turning point for Africa’s economic and tourism development.Kaunda urged African leaders to emulate the likes of Nelson Mandela, Jomo Kanyata, Oliver Tambo and Kwame Nkrumah, who fought tirelessly for the liberation and development of the continent.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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What Instagram Taught A Photographer About Life

first_imgThis idea that people were so consumed with sharing their every moment—something people previously said about the Facebook status and the tweet—seems magnified with Instagram. Taking a photo of your perfectly composed food suggests that you think it’s beautiful enough to share with the world—but not delicious enough to start eating immediately.And food photos are only the tip of the iceberg. Think about every time you visit a famous landmark, ride your bike past a beautiful landscape, or notice how striking the light of the sunset looks against the clouds.“Many photographs today are take-once and view-once (probably in the next few days), and have little value beyond that, at least currently,” Ames says. “I can imagine archaeologists sifting through our digital remains sometime in the future and these photographs serving useful functions for them, but will we ever go back and look at our meals and shopping lists and pretty sunsets? It’s hard to say.”When Systrom explains the ideas driving Instagram’s popularity, he strikes a particularly interesting note when he says that life in the digital age is driven by staying in touch, that central desire of human nature that made us, in the pre-smartphone age, increasingly more separated from those we used to know as time goes on.“Success to us in the future is where everyone in the world has the Instagram app in their lives,” he says.Keeping in touch through Instagram is a fantastic solution to bridging the thousands of miles that separate us from friends and family members, but it’s also a very superficial and one-sided take on the social network. To go deeper, Ames suggest, you have to be willing to accept the fact that Instagram has cheapened the photographic image, and therefore by extension, lessened the value we get out of moments we’re so eager to share.“It seems that photographs are now more commonly being used as a stand-in for medium-term and even short-term memories as well,” she says. “Even though the resulting photographs are cheapened, the pressure to take the photographs in the first place hasn’t necessarily lessened.”“Success to us in the future is where everyone in the world has the Instagram app in their lives.”Viewed through a social-network lens, if Twitter is an inside look into someone’s mind from a textual standpoint, and Facebook a view into that person’s world from a social one, then Instagram is the next frontier: the closest thing to participating in someone else’s physical experience, visually.That’s where the pitfalls for all of us reside. Ames sums up the ambiguity of Instagram’s value when pitted against the compulsions it fosters on a personal note.“I rarely go back and look through these photographs I’ve taken—time and attention, as always, are the bottlenecks—and I sometimes joke, even as I take photos, that it’d be better if I just put the camera away and experience the world more directly,” she says.“Of course, I don’t.”Image ControlWhen Dallas rejoined Instagram in late 2011, he felt refreshed. It was this new take on the app that let him approach it in a manner that reassured him he had the control, and 100,000 plus more followers without needing another break set that in stone.”I would say 99% of my feed is iPhone,” Dallas says. Since then, Dallas’s life as an Instagram celebrity of sorts has pushed him far beyond what he imagined possible when, at his friend’s insistence more than two years ago, he put the app back on his iPhone home screen.More recently, he was approached by Orchestra, the company behind iOS email app Mailbox, while it was in beta. It wanted to feature his and other Instagrammers’ photos as a reward for users who hit “inbox zero”—a state of cutting through email clutter. (That’s how ReadWrite first heard of Dallas’s work.)When Toyota approached him recently for a special vehicle shoot, they didn’t want the photos he could take with his Canon 5D Mark III. “They wanted me to bring my iPhone,” he says with a laugh.“I’m still looking for awesome shots to share that are interesting and maybe inspiring, but I’m trying to not let it just be about Instagram,” he says. It’s a feeling not so unfamiliar to many of us in our daily lives who find ourselves in conflict with the obtrusive nature of a smartphone and the crisp click of a shutter-mimicking tone the moment a scene strikes us. A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Dirk Dallas, a graphic designer currently residing in southern California, downloaded the photo-sharing and -filtering app Instagram the day it came out on October 6, 2010. He then promptly deleted it.“It didn’t make sense because unless you follow people or have followers, what is it?” the 30-year-old university professor says of his early mindset. Flash forward two and a half years, after a friend told Dallas to give the app another try, and he has 106,000 followers under the handle @dirka.And Instagram itself has changed, becoming part of Facebook through a billion-dollar acquisition.For users like Dallas, Instagram is a verb, and a well-paying one. For Dallas, one recent gig involved Toyota, who paid him to participate in an Instagram-oriented photo shoot. He’s been approached numerous other times, and turned down some of the offers.“I’ve had to walk a fine line of, ‘Wow I’m really selling out,’ or, ‘I’m pulling a fast one on my followers,’” he explains. The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos And Dallas is not alone. He represents a sliver of the app’s 100 million users who are not professional photographers, photojournalists, or celebrities, yet have amassed a massive following through their keen eye and commitment to the community. To put it in perspective, Instagram cofounder Mike Krieger has only 65,000 more followers than Dallas. (Celebrities attract considerably more: LeBron James has 2.5 million).But while it sounds like a dream come true—using a smartphone app to launch an Internet-based career on the side—Dallas has battled a common enemy in many heavy Instagram users’ paths: himself.“I used to be kind of obsessed in a negative way,” he admits. “Instagram kind of consumed me.”Before he had over 100,000 followers and before his Instagram presence became a revenue stream, he struggled with an issue at the very core of the photo-sharing app: the way it has latched onto its users and assimilated itself into our daily lives, for better and for worse.“Instagram kind of consumed me.”With Facebook’s backing, Instagram is here to stay, and the effects of its pressure to scan for, snap, and constantly think about shareable moments day in and day out is central to the way our digital existences bleed into our physical experiences.“Instagram Is Not A Photography Company”Instagram co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger in a sit-down with Kevin Rose, of Google Ventures and Digg, at the Castro Theatre in San Francisco, CA in May. When Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom, a clean-cut towering Stanford grad, addressed a crowd at the Castro Theatre in San Francisco in May, he reiterated multiple times that the company he cofounded “is not a photography company.”“Instagram is a communications company,” Systrom said. “It’s about communicating a moment. It just so happens that that message happens to be an image.”His insistence of this point throughout the night’s Q&A conversation, moderated by Digg founder and Google Ventures partner Kevin Rose, bordered on the evangelical. Systrom showed an almost Steve Jobs-like marketing magic. He spoke as if the crowd needed convincing that Instagram was worth the $1 billion Facebook paid for it last April. They didn’t.Instagram has no real competitors. Sure, there’s Hipstamatic and Flickr’s smartphone app and Twitter’s mobile photo-filter options, but none of these will ever come close to commanding Instagram’s near-synonymous identity with photo sharing in the minds of its users.Projecteo, an Instagram projector that, for $34.99, can show off 10 of your shots on 35 mm slide, secured $87,000 in Kickstarter funding last year. We’ll soon have physical evidence. There’s already an Instagram-linked slide projector, and an upcoming Polaroid-made instant-print camera.As Systrom said himself that night, “Anyone can make a filter app.” What Instagram did was different. It dug into our souls, and it’s part of our daily digital ecosystem on a private and personal level comparable only to Facebook, not coincidentally.Part of its success was in the way Instagram took the hurdles of photography out of photo sharing.For one, you can’t make an image horizontal or vertical; all photos are square. (Apple appears to be following Instagram’s lead—a split-second preview of the next version of the iPhone operating system showed a square-photo mode.)Within less than a minute, your photo is telegraphed to the world. With Instagram, photography became more than just easy. It became natural.“I shared something, my photo got a bit of action, and it was awesome,” Dallas explains of the first photo he took after he re-downloaded the app a few months after deleting it on its launch day. “I got instant feedback.”It turned out some of his friends and Twitter followers had stumbled onto his account while the app remained off his phone. While he’d temporarily abandoned Instagram, it hadn’t forgotten him—and that gave him a small following to come back to.The feedback is the key to Instagram’s success and growth. It’s the reason communities with thousands of people spring up around hashtags in mere hours. But it’s also the source of the now-too-familiar narcissistic tendencies—that need to show everyone what you’re about to eat for lunch, for instance, and the negativity that comes with that.Instagram is now yet another pillar of society’s continuously strained and conflicted relationship with social networks. For the photo-sharing app, the dangers lurk deeper than with Twitter or Facebook or Tumblr because with Instagram, our very experiences are our digital currency.The devaluation of daily life to a struggle for likes and exposure and reaffirmation can force us to reconsider and reflect upon the reasons we love Instagram so much—or why, love it or hate it, we can’t quit it.The Conflicted Relationship With SharingDirk Dallas’ heavy Instagram use has earned him 106,000 followers, but that was only after he took a self-imposed break. “Instagram kind of consumed me,” he admits. After a few months of near-constant use, Dallas decided to take a break from Instagram.“I actually stepped back for about four months,” he says. The app ended up taking away from Dallas’s own experience of the very moments his followers were so keen to like.“Right off the bat, it made me very aware of my surroundings…. I was always trying to look for something epic to share.”Dallas’s personal conflict exposes the potentially destructive relationship we can have with an app that also helps us connect in amazing ways.“It seems that there are a few populations that are particularly impacted by these technologies,” says Morgan G. Ames, a graduate of Stanford’s PhD progam in communication who specializes in the ways new technologies impact our everyday lives. “One would be parents of younger children who can capture and share all aspects of the minutiae of their children’s everyday lives.“Some parents seem to feel a tremendous pressure to capture all of the ‘important’ moments of their child’s lives, which can make their lives feel more exciting and important, but can also add a great deal of stress,” she adds.This kind of Insta-stress happens in other circumstances, too.Take the food photo for instance. As early as August of last year, GQ’s Luke Zaleski wrote, “The best way to Instagram your food? Don’t. It’s time to go on an Insta-diet.” More recently, you have the Tumblr “Pictures Of Hipsters Taking Pictures Of Food.” Tags:#Facebook#Instagram#photo sharing#social networks Related Posts center_img nick statt For Dallas, it helped to tell himself, “‘Hey, I’m at this cool spot, I need to be here right now, live in the moment.’” For him, the pitfalls of the app are avoidable through this self-meditation. “So now I feel like I’m bringing Instagram with me as opposed to I’m just going somewhere to Instagram.”Just last month, Dallas visited some visually stunning spots in Arizona and New Mexico with friends, and brought along his Canon DSLR because he was less worried about Instagram authenticity and the idea of an immediate post.After his trip came to a close, he shared a select few shots, specifically some astounding long exposure light images, with his followers, stressing to everyone that the shots were taken with his “big-boy camera” for pure pleasure.“I wanted to experience those in my eye, to make those memories,” he says, “and Instagram came along.” Photo of Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger by Nick Statt for ReadWrite; all other photos [except food photos] by Dirk Dallas Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verificationlast_img read more

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a month agoMan City midfielder Sterling relieved to score in Everton win

first_imgMan City midfielder Sterling relieved to score in Everton winby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City midfielder Raheem Sterling was relieved to score their third in victory over Everton having missed a chance not long before.The England forward bagged his eight goal of the campaign – and the 100th of his career – with a shot that struck the underside of the crossbar, sealing the points for the champions.“It was a really good moment, especially at 2-1 to make it 3-1- it was a really nice feeling,” said Sterling.“I had chance earlier on and didn’t know was onside until I dragged it wide – you just have to stay focused.“I was running into the box, but thinking Riyad couldn’t make that pass, but it went through the defender’s leg, I took it early and I didn’t get enough on it.“I knew another chance would come. I was waiting for an opportunity and it eventually came.“But you have to finish chances like that off because in the Premier League you can be punished.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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ESPN’s Jay Williams: Bulls Are Rumored To Want Iowa State’s Fred Hoiberg As Their New Coach

first_imgFred Hoiberg dances in new Infiniti comemrcial.YouTubeOne of the major stories around the sports world currently is the news that Chicago Bulls star Derrick Rose needs another knee surgery and is likely to miss the rest of the NBA season. The Bulls are 36-21 and in third place in the NBA’s Eastern Conference, but there are already some rumblings that Rose’s injury coupled with a possible early playoff exit could spell the end of Chicago head coach Tom Thibodeau. ESPN college basketball analyst Jay Williams has heard the Bulls have not only thought about life after Thibodeau, but have also considered who they’d want to replace him. That someone is Iowa State head coach Fred Hoiberg.Rumors circulating that people within the Bulls organization are interested in Fred Hoiberg of Iowa State as their next head coach.— Jay Williams (@RealJayWilliams) February 25, 2015Hoiberg is an Iowa State alumnus and a 10-year NBA veteran. Four of those professional seasons came with the Bulls. Since taking over as the head coach of his alma mater in 2010, Hoiberg is 110-53 overall and 4-2 in the NCAA Tournament.last_img read more

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ESPN Releases Week 11 Power Rankings After Upset-Heavy Saturday

first_imgESPN week 11 power rankings after upset weekend.espn week 11 power rankings lee corso alabama mascot headInstagram/alecmorris_11This past Saturday, both Clemson and Alabama notched huge in-conference victories, taking control of their respective leagues. Appropriately, ESPN now has the Tigers and the Tide ranked 1-2 in its weekly Power Rankings. Ohio State, which beat Minnesota in a lackluster affair, drops a spot to No. 3. Baylor stayed at No. 4 after handling Kansas State Thursday night.Some other big movers? Notre Dame rose five spots to No. 5 after downing Pitt. Oklahoma State, after surprising TCU, is up six spots to No. 6. And Iowa, after a win over Indiana, is now all the way up to No. 7.Here’s the entire list, via ESPN. Do they have it right?1. Clemson2. Alabama3. Ohio State4. Baylor5. Notre Dame6. Oklahoma State7. Iowa8. Stanford9. LSU10. Oklahoma11. Florida12. Utah13. TCU14. Michigan State15. Michigan16. Houston17. Florida State18. North Carolina19. Temple20. UCLA21. Navy22. Northwestern23. Mississippi State24. Wisconsin25. MemphisYou can view last week’s list here.last_img read more

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Clemson LB Ben Boulware Calls Out Twitter Troll, 3 Years Later, Regarding His Success

first_imgBen Boulware tweet.ben boulware takes on twitter trollClemson junior linebacker Ben Boulware, a former four-star recruit, has accomplished a great deal in his short career. Monday, he made sure that one of his doubters recognized that fact.Boulware, who was named Orange Bowl defensive MVP after his performance against Oklahoma, tweeted out a list of his accomplishments and tagged a Twitter troll who told him, back in 2012, that he would never even start for the Tigers.ACC champ, Orange Bowl MVP, 1st Team All-ACC…I hope you didn’t think I was going to forget @TrippWilliams60 pic.twitter.com/1l0j9abN2p— Ben Boulware (@benboulware7) January 25, 2016 Boulware likely still has one goal left in college – to win a national title. We’ll see if he can prove everyone wrong again in 2016.last_img read more

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Conservative icon David Koch leaving business politics

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – Billionaire conservative icon David Koch is stepping down from the Koch brothers’ network of business and political activities.The 78-year-old New York resident is suffering from deteriorating health, according to a letter that older brother Charles Koch sent to company officials Tuesday morning.Charles Koch wrote that he is “deeply saddened” by his brother’s retirement. “David has always been a fighter and is dealing with this challenge in the same way,” he wrote.David Koch is leaving his roles as executive vice-president and board member for Koch Industries and a subsidiary, Koch Chemical Technology group, where he served as chairman and chief executive officer. Koch is also stepping down as chairman of the board for the Americans For Prosperity Foundation, the charity related to Koch brothers’ primary political organization.Charles Koch had assumed a more visible leadership role in the brothers’ affairs in recent years. He will continue to serve as the CEO of Koch Industries and the unofficial face of the network’s political efforts.Democrats have demonized the Koch brothers for their outsized influence in conservative politics over the last decade. Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid regularly attacked Republicans for what he called a “Koch addiction.”Yet the Kochs have clashed with the Trump administration at times.Citing concerns about Trump’s style and substance, the network refused to endorse either presidential candidate in the 2016 election. And while they have praised Trump’s policies on taxes, de-regulation and health care, they have aggressively attacked the Republican administration’s trade policies. On Monday, the Koch network announced a multi-million-dollar campaign to oppose Trump’s tariffs and highlight the benefit of free trade.Using the money they made from their Kansas-based family business empire, the Koch brothers have created what is likely the nation’s most powerful political organization with short- and long-term goals. Their network has promised to spend $400 million to shape the 2018 midterm elections. They have also devoted significant time and resources to strengthening conservative influence on college campuses, in the Hispanic community and in the non-profit sector.David Koch, who served as the Libertarian Party’s vice-presidential candidate in 1980, had begun focus more on philanthropy in recent years.The Manhattan resident donated $150 million to New York City’s Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in 2015, the largest gift in the organization’s history. He has also given $185 million in total donations to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his alma mater.In an April interview with the Washington Examiner, Charles Koch described his younger brother this way: “David is much more political than I am.”Charles continued: “David is a much better engineer than I am and is much more into the arts and social life. Obviously he’s got to be or he wouldn’t live in Manhattan. And David is much more into elective politics than I am.”In Tuesday’s letter, Charles Koch said his brother’s “guidance and loyalty, especially in our most troubled times, has been unwavering.”“David has never wanted anything for himself that he hasn’t earned, as his sole desire has always been to contribute,” he wrote.last_img read more

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Dollarama reports 1335M Q4 profit comparable store sales growth slows

first_imgMONTREAL — Dollarama Inc. says it earned $133.5 million in its latest quarter, up from $130.1 million a year ago.The retailer says the profit amounted to 41 cents per diluted share for the company’s third quarter, up from 38 cents per share in the same quarter last year.Analysts on average had expected a profit of 42 cents per share for the quarter, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Sales for the quarter ended Oct. 28 totalled $864.3 million, up from $810.6 million, while comparable store sales grew 3.1 per cent compared with growth of 4.6 per cent in the same quarter a year ago.The comparable store sales growth was due to a 4.0 per cent increase in average transaction size, partially offset by a 0.9 per cent drop in the number of transactions.Dollarama says the rate of comparable store sales growth in the most recent quarter reflected its decision to strategically limit price increases in recent quarters. The Canadian Press Companies in this story: (TSX:DOL)last_img read more

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Mens Basketball Penn State rains on No 13 Ohio State from 3

Ohio State senior forward Jae’Sean Tate (1) blocks a shot in the first half of the game against Penn State on Jan. 25 in the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorThough Ohio State redshirt junior forward Keita Bates-Diop was questionable to start Thursday night’s game against Penn State with an illness, he was able to start for the Buckeyes, and when the team needed him most. With his team trailing by nine points with just over a minute left in the game, Bates-Diop made back-to-back 3s to bring Ohio State to within three. Senior forward Jae’Sean Tate made a layup to bring the game to within one point. With 15 seconds left and two made free throws by Penn State, Ohio State put all of its hopes of extending its win streak on the shoulders of Bates-Diop, who made a back-breaking 3-pointer with five seconds left to tie the game and seemingly send the game to overtime. Somehow, it was not enough. Sophomore guard Tony Carr banked in a buzzer-beating 3 to win the game for Penn State 82-79. No. 13 Ohio State (18-5, 9-1 Big Ten) was outscored 44-42 in the second half, dropping its first conference game of the season to Penn State (14-8, 3-5 Big Ten). Penn State was led by Carr, who finished the game with 28 points, five rebounds and five assists, shooting 9-of-12 from the field. Senior guard Shep Garner made 4-of-5 shots from 3 to finish the game with 14 points. For the majority of the game, the Buckeyes seemingly had nothing but rim-rattlers and near-makes from 3-point range, while Penn State made 11-of-14 from beyond the arc. But Ohio State finished the game strong on 3-point shooting thanks to the makes by Bates-Diop, going 7-for-15 overall. Bates-Diop finished with a team-leading 25 points. The two teams came out of halftime trading leads with five changes in the first four minutes. Penn State finally settled in with a 48-43 lead after going on a 6-0 run off three straight turnovers. The Nittany Lions added to that run with two more free throws after senior forward Jae’Sean Tate’s third foul of the night and Ohio State’s sixth of the half in just under five minutes of play.Trailing by 10, Ohio State made a push with a layup from Tate and redshirt senior guard Andrew Dakich. But Penn State with responded with a 10-4 run to bring the score to 67-54 and seemingly push the game out of reach. Tate finished the game with 17 points and a game-high 10 rebounds. Penn State came out of the gate untouchable from beyond the arc, draining five straight 3-point attempts — all from the wing and a few steps behind the line — to take an early 16-6 lead after the first media timeout. Bates-Diop subbed out earlier than normal at the 14:49 mark in the game. He had missed his first shot before being replaced. Tate provided the Buckeyes with all their points during Bates-Diop’s one-minute long absence, drawing two fouls in the paint and making four free throws.After falling behind 20-8 with 14:13 left in the first half, Ohio State went on a 17-9 run to draw the game to within four points. Penn State added a point on a free throw, but Bates-Diop knocked down a wide-open 3-pointer and floated a tear-drop jump-shot from the paint to tie the game at 30.Ohio State closed out the first half on a 4-0 run to draw the game to 38-37 while Penn State limped to the halfway mark without scoring in the last 2:27 of the half. read more

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