Limerick brothers win overall ICT award at Enterprise Ireland’s Student Entrepreneur…

first_imgFROM a 3D printed education toolkit to a detection device for brain injury in newborns, the most innovative projects scooped the top prizes at Enterprise Ireland’s Student Entrepreneur Awards 2020. Advertisement LimerickNewsLimerick brothers win overall ICT award at Enterprise Ireland’s Student Entrepreneur Awards 2020By Meghann Scully – June 15, 2020 1052 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Brothers Nick and Jack Cotter from Co. Limerick won the Local Enterprise Office ICT Award worth €5,000 in cash prize funding.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Their product the Cotter Crate is a patent-pending, lamb handling system that makes dosing and weighing lambs easier, faster, and prevents back injury. Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Twitter Richard Murphy, Manager LEO Support, Policy & Co-ordination Unit, Enterprise Ireland said: “Today’s Student Entrepreneur Awards final recognised young innovators across the country and celebrated their entrepreneurial success.“This year’s applicants have identified challenges across a range of sectors and provided innovative solutions to overcome them.“Nurturing this talent and helping to foster that entrepreneurship is essential, not just to turn ideas into thriving businesses, but to help drive Ireland’s global reputation in business.” he added.center_img WhatsApp Email Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Print Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Previous articleLimerick Post Show | Fund A Cobble | Hunt MuseumNext articleWar of words over Caherdavin Park improvement Meghann Scully Linkedin Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League openerlast_img read more

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Stages of superconductivity

first_imgMore than two decades after scientists discovered a new type of copper-based high-temperature superconductor — energy-efficient material that can carry electricity without waste — Harvard physicists say they have unlocked the chemical secret that controls its “fool’s gold” phase, which mimics, but doesn’t have all the advantageous properties of, superconductivity.In an effort to better understand the phase, called the “pseudogap,” Associate Professor of Physics Jenny Hoffman and Ilija Zeljkovic, a graduate student working in Hoffman’s lab, began studying where oxygen atoms — a critical element added (“doped”) to a copper-based ceramic to create the superconducting material —are located in the material’s crystal structure.As reported July 20 in Science, their surprising finding is that it isn’t oxygen, but a lack of it, that appears to be most strongly related to the pseudogap. The finding, Hoffman said, should give researchers the understanding to begin designing materials to act as superconductors at even higher temperatures.“The important finding here is that we believe we have the chemical handle on what is controlling the local pseudogap,” Hoffman said. “The goal is to get to a place where we can say we understand these copper-based superconductors, and then take the next step to achieving higher temperatures. I’m extremely optimistic that we are going to get to room-temperature superconductors someday, but I think we’re probably still a couple decades away.”Discovered in 1988, the copper-based material Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (called “bisco” by researchers) may be one of the keys to creating higher-temperature superconductors.A flaky, black material, bisco is capable of acting as a superconductor, but that useful property is accompanied by several frustrating problems, Hoffman said. For example, bisco is not ductile, it works poorly in magnetic fields, and current flows well through the material only in certain directions.The microscope used in their superconductor is pictured here. Photo by Ilija Zeljkovic“The bottom line is: Despite technical challenges, copper-based superconductors are great, they were a breath of fresh air in superconductivity research when they were discovered,” Hoffman said. “It’s really tantalizing — we feel as if these materials suggest that there may be something better out there, but we don’t understand them well enough to get from here to whatever it is out there that’s better.”For a decade and a half, Hoffman said, much of that work has been focused on the pseudogap, an unusual rearrangement of the electron energy levels in the material that can mimic superconductivity, which has divided researchers.“There has been a tremendous amount of work focused on trying to understand the pseudogap, for two reasons,” Hoffman said. “There is one school of thought that argues that this pseudogap might actually be superconductivity that’s simply being foiled in some way. The alternate theory is that the pseudogap is actually a competing phase, one that must be defeated to achieve superconductivity.”Earlier studies hinted at a link between the oxygen dopants and the pseudogap, but the results were far from definitive, Hoffman said, because researchers had only been able to image about one-third of the oxygen dopants in the material. To get a fuller picture, she and Zeljkovic were able to turn up the energy range on a piece of equipment designed to capture atomic-scale images of the material: a scanning tunneling microscope.The microscope, built by Zeljkovic and two other graduate students, Liz Main and Adam Pivonka, works by positioning its needlelike tip several angstroms from a sample. By measuring the electrical current that flows between the tip and the sample, researchers are able to image individual atoms in the material. Using the device, however, comes with significant technical challenges.“The idea is to keep the tip at a constant distance from the sample as you sweep it across the surface, similar to the way the read-head on a computer hard drive works, but 100 times closer,” Zeljkovic said. “The challenge is that angstroms are really, really small — about one ten-billionth of a meter — so you need a tremendous amount of vibration isolation. Basically, everything in the room — even the room itself — is built to limit vibrations that can ruin a scan.”By slowly sweeping the microscope tip over a 35-nanometer-square area over six hours, Hoffman and Zeljkovic were able to create a map of every oxygen dopant in the top three atomic layers of the material. When that map was compared with data that showed the local strength of the pseudogap, they found a surprise.Rather than being correlated with any of the interstitial oxygen atoms — those dopants intentionally added to the metal to give it superconducting properties — the pseudogap seemed to be connected with defects in the material caused by removing oxygen atoms from positions immediately adjacent to copper atoms.“This is the first time we’ve been able to look at all the oxygen interstitials and vacancies at the same time,” Hoffman said. “What Ilija has done is to correlate the oxygen locations with the strength of the pseudogap. Now, for the first time, we can make a statement about the exact chemistry that’s affecting the pseudogap, and we have a chemical handle on how to control something that everyone in this field has been focusing on for the last 15 years.”Hoffman and Zeljkovic are also working to understand what causes the pseudogap in the first place. They recently invented an algorithm to increase the effective spatial resolution of the same microscope to the picometer level — one-trillionth of a meter. Their new resolution allows them to rule out one possible cause of the pseudogap: a minute structural distortion that breaks the inversion symmetry of the crystal. This work was also reported this month, in Nature Materials.“The reason we’re so interested in the pseudogap is because we believe it’s competing with superconductivity,” Hoffman continued. “But even if you don’t agree that it’s competing, you still want to know what it is, and how to control it. Until now, we didn’t have any practical knobs to turn to modify the pseudogap. How could we begin to understand superconductivity in these materials if we didn’t have a way to tune this alternate phase that superconductivity seems to arise out of?”last_img read more

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Arch Coal, in Nod to Market Trends, Abandons Lease-Expansion Application

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享SNL:Arch Coal Inc. has withdrawn its application for a lease on a federal tract of land in Wyoming that would have expanded its Black Thunder mine.The request to lease the West Hilight tract was withdrawn at the end of August, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management confirmed in an email. “We currently have more than 1.1 billion tons of Powder River Basin reserves under lease, and are targeting annual production of 70 [million] to 80 million tons per year at Black Thunder,” Arch spokeswoman Logan Bonacorsi said. “The decision to withdraw the application was made after careful evaluation of our near-term needs and a commitment to a judicious capital allocation approach.”The Black Thunder mine is the second-largest coal mine by production in the country.More: Arch says downsized Black Thunder no longer in need of new federal coal tract Arch Coal, in Nod to Market Trends, Abandons Lease-Expansion Applicationlast_img read more

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Blue Ridge Parkway to Receive $3.1 Million Land Grant

first_imgThe Blue Ridge Parkway is set to expand by 1,654 acres in the Plott Balsam Mountains of Jackson County, North Carolina.The expansion is being made possible by a generous land grant from The Nature Conservancy valued at just over $3 million.The gifted land, which can be seen from the Waterrock Knob Overlook, is of particular importance to conservationists because it harbors two federally endangered mammals— the North Carolina flying squirell and the Indiana bat— and a rare type of rhododendron often called pinkshell azalea. It’s also home to nine other rare plant species as well as rare Red spruce and Fraser fir habitat.With this new land acquisition, which comes as the National Park Service celebrates its 100th anniversary, NPS hopes to improve the overall visitor experience of the Blue Ridge Parkway, an attraction that drew more that 15 million visitors last year alone.“Every time a property is conserved adjacent to the Blue Ridge Parkway, it improves the visitor experience by preserving scenic vistas, water quality, and habitat for wildlife,” Blue Ridge Parkway Superintendent Mark Woods told the Asheville Citizen-Times last month.In addition to hosting rare plants and animals, the newly donated tract, visible from Milepost 452, contains the highest summit in all of the Plott Balsam Range at an elevation of 6,292 feet.According to the Citizen Times, the land will be added to an adjacent 5,000 acres later this month to make up a new conservation area to be known as Waterrock Knob Park.Related Content:last_img read more

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Brazilian Navy Ship Leaves for Haiti on February 1st

first_imgBy Dialogo January 28, 2010 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – The tank landing ship (LST) “Almirante Saboia,” recently commissioned into the Brazilian Navy, will be on its way to Haiti in coming days. The Brazilian Navy has been prepared to deploy the ship since the beginning of the Brazilian aid effort for that country and was waiting for a decision regarding the cargo and the moment to transport it. Now that the phase of priority transport of emergency teams and supplies has come to an end, during which the need for speed and the less bulky and lighter nature of the cargo pointed to air transport as the most appropriate, it is time for the transport of bulkier and heavier supplies. Therefore, the interministerial coordination of aid to Haiti has decided on the utilization of the ship, while naturally maintaining the current necessary air efforts. The loading of the ship is scheduled to continue until January 31st, in Rio de Janeiro, and it will depart next Monday, February 1st, with a cargo of approximately 700 tons of supplies for the Navy troops (Marines), the Brazilian Army troops, and humanitarian aid for the Haitian people. The LST “Almirante Saboia” will arrive in Haiti on February 17th and will remain operational in the region for approximately thirty days, supporting humanitarian actions and the MINUSTAH troops. Another Brazilian Navy ship, the LST “Mattoso Maia,” is available to transport up to 1,500 tons of cargo and is also expected to depart in February, after taking on cargo.last_img read more

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The benefits of voice biometrics

first_img continue reading » In 2015, Kate Hopson read a troubling statistic: One in every 500 calls will be a fraudulent attempt by 2016.For the contact center manager at Virginia Credit Union ($3.6B, Richmond, VA), the number was concerning. At that time, Hopson’s operation was fielding approximately 55,000 calls per month, and the credit union’s authentication process was disliked by members for being both laborious and long. On average, it took members 90 seconds to authenticate. But with fraud on the rise, VACU wanted to ensure it was protecting its members. Could it do so while providing an excellent experience?“Those processes were not efficient or well received by members,” Hopson says. “We needed to shift how we authenticated members over the phone.” ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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