EPA Rejects Oil Industry Request, Supports Ethanol

first_img Facebook Twitter EPA Rejects Oil Industry Request, Supports Ethanol Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Nov 11, 2016 EPA Rejects Oil Industry Request, Supports EthanolTom BuisJust one day after the election, the EPA has rejected a request by the oil industry and ruled in favor of renewable fuels. Oil refiners had petitioned the EPA to allow them to change the point of obligation, which  means refiners would shift the responsibility for blending ethanol into gasoline to wholesalers and retailers. Tom Buis, with Growth Energy, said the agency rejected the request on Thursday, which is good news for ethanol, “Our goal has been to give consumers more choice at the pump with E-15. If the oil industry request had been approved, it would have made it harder to get E-15 at the pump.” The agency is set to release new blending requirements at the end of this month, and Buis is optimistic the agency will allow the highest blending levels allowed by law.Buis said he is optimistic that the EPA under a Trump administration will be a much different agency, “There will be a change in leadership and philosophy.  Mr. Trump will be taking a look at all the regulations.”While President-Elect Trump and VP-Elect Pence are both strong supporters of the Renewable Fuels Standard, Buis says ethanol still faces a tough fight in Washington, “In Washington, hypocrisy is not a sin — it is a fine art. So we have to remain vigilant to make sure people don’t change their minds.” Home Indiana Agriculture News EPA Rejects Oil Industry Request, Supports Ethanol SHARE SHARE Previous articleIndiana Young Farmer Winners AnnouncedNext articleMorning Outlook Gary Truittlast_img read more

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Space Force may not end up being a separate department

first_imgTrump Campaign(WASHINGTON) — Maybe the Space Force won’t be a separate department after all, but it could be a separate military service within the Air Force.A U.S. official confirmed to ABC News that the White House has asked the Pentagon to explore alternatives to the creation of an independent space force, including a model similar to how the Marine Corps operates as a service within the Navy Department.The White House request was first reported by Defense One, citing an Oct. 26 White House memo instructing the Pentagon to explore alternatives to the creation of a Space Force as a separate military department.A U.S. official confirmed to ABC News that the White House had asked the Pentagon to explore multiple options to meet the president’s intent for a new military service dedicated to space.Those additional options include the creation of a Space Force operating as a new sixth military service under the Department of the Air Force model, where a new space service would fall under the Department of the Air Force or could be as a completely separate department with its own civilian secretary, said the official.Creating a new Space Force under the Department of the Air Force would be a model similar to how the Marine Corps operates as a separate service under the Department of the Navy. The creation of a “Space Corps” has garnered bipartisan congressional support in the past.The official stressed that all of the options are intended to meet the president’s intent for a separate space service, whether inside or outside of the Air Force.The creation of a new Space Force has been a priority for President Donald Trump, who has often cited it at campaign rallies.“We are going to have the Air Force and we are going to have the Space Force — separate but equal,” Trump said.In line with his comments, the Pentagon has focused on creating a new Space Force under a new Department of the Space Force, a move that would require congressional legislation.“In concert with the guidance, direction, and vision from the White House, we are generating options for the Space Force as a sixth military service branch,” said Lt. Col. Joseph Buccino, a spokesman for Deputy Defense Secretary Pat Shanahan, who heads the Pentagon’s efforts to create a new military service.But the U.S. official said that the internal discussion to meet the president’s intent has evolved to include a review of additional options.A second U.S. official told ABC News that that there have always been different options to get to a space force.The White House did not respond to a request for comment Wednesday night.An Air Force document obtained by ABC News in September estimated that the creation of a new Space Force might cost $13 billion.But in mid-November, Shanahan told reporters he believed that the cost might be in the single digits and that “it might be lower than five” billion dollars. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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It’s a family affair: Ticklebelly Lane Bakery, Lincoln

first_imgFamily matters at The Ticklebelly Lane Bakery and Tea House. And this family-run business wants its customers to feel at home in its site just off Lincoln’s High Street.“We wanted to create a place where people felt comfortable, a place for them to relax and be part of the Ticklebelly family,” explains Vicky Cook, operations manager and wife of co-owner James. A former headteacher, Vicky has recently moved away from education to help James and his mum Julie, Ticklebelly’s other owner, taking charge of a range of tasks across the business. Those visiting the site have a choice of three rooms in which to cosy up, including The Bakers’ Suite and Attic that offers a selection of armchairs and nooks in which to escape. The decor across all floors is homely, with walls hand-painted by Vicky, trinkets, and chalkboard sayings such as ‘a balanced diet is a cake in both hands’.It took a lot of work to convert the former photo shop into a homely setting. “It needed a little bit of TLC and a big bank balance,” says Vicky (James chuckles in the background suggesting she is being modest). “It took longer than planned and cost a bit more but it was worth it.”On arrival, shoppers are greeted by an impressive window display stacked with a variety of loaves from Ticklebelly’s top seller, sourdough, to the unusual Dragon’s Tail (see box out), focaccia, ciabatta and bakery staples of white and brown loaves. Sweet treats, including vegan and gluten-free options, and handmade sausage rolls topped with pastry pigs adorn the counter.While the pastries, cakes and other fare are prepared on-site by chef Dwayne and the team, the bread is made just outside the city at Ticklebelly’s dedicated bakehouse and delivered daily. The bakehouse also serves the business’s commercial contracts, including Doddington Hall, the local Waterstones café and nearby events firms.At the shop, it’s clear the locals are taken with Ticklebelly’s products by the way they interact with the staff. “The feedback from the locals has been great,” notes Vicky. “One woman told us ‘Lincoln needs a proper bread the way it used to be made’. She now comes in regularly.”With a menu covering breakfast, lunch and dinner, visitors can even stay late into the evening as the bakery hosts its first few Cake & Cocktails, Prosecco & Puddings night and other experience days. With that much to stay for, they’ll have to convince customers to leave.Who:  James and Vicky Cook(pictured with their two children), respectively owner and operations manager, Ticklebelly Lane BakeryWhat: Ticklebelly Lane Bakery and Tea House is just off Lincoln High Street and comprises a traditional bakery shop front with three floors dedicated to relaxing with cake and a cuppa or participating in an Italian bread baking class.Where: 5 Guildhall Street, Lincoln, LN1 1TTWhen: The bakery and tea house opened in November 2017, but the business has been a home bakery since 2010.Why: “We started off in our kitchen and grew and grew,” says Vicky. “The new site was a natural step for us – it’s about moving away from being the name behind other people’s food to putting the Ticklebelly stamp on Lincoln.”…On-site – Ticklebelly LaneOrigin of the name:“A public lane that used to run down the side of the house. A farmer would run his pigs down it and the grass would tickle their bellies. Hence the name.”cameramake Canonfocallength 35height 360fnumber 5.6exposuretime 0.0125camerasoftware paint.net 4.0.17originaldate 1/19/2018 3:40:23 PMwidth 640cameramodel Canon EOS 700DOpen plan: The ground floor of Ticklebelly’s site allows customers to see all the action in the kitchen, from the creation of homemade sausage rolls to cakes being decorated.cameramake Canonfocallength 18height 360fnumber 3.5exposuretime 0.0333333351camerasoftware paint.net 4.0.17originaldate 1/19/2018 3:57:54 PMwidth 640cameramodel Canon EOS 700DDragon’s Tail:This unusual looking loaf is one of Ticklebelly’s best-sellers. “Like nachos in bread form”, the plaited bread has a fiery kick and is topped with crushed tortilla chips.cameramake Canonfocallength 18height 360fnumber 4exposuretime 0.0333333351camerasoftware paint.net 4.0.17originaldate 1/19/2018 3:43:01 PMwidth 640cameramodel Canon EOS 700DBake & Date: Ticklebelly hosts classes and themed nights for locals, including Bake & Date, Chocolate Heaven and the self-explanatory Cake & Cocktails, Prosecco & Puddings nights.focallength 18flash 9cameramake Canonheight 360fnumber 4exposuretime 0.0166666675camerasoftware paint.net 4.0.17originaldate 1/19/2018 3:06:10 PMwidth 640cameramodel Canon EOS 700DPart of the family: “The small blue oven is one of the first we ever had,” says Vicky. It now resides in the tea house kitchen alongside a Burco double oven and six-burner hob. cameramake Canonfocallength 18height 360fnumber 3.5exposuretime 0.0333333351camerasoftware paint.net 4.0.17originaldate 1/19/2018 3:49:43 PMwidth 640cameramodel Canon EOS 700DLocal matters: “Where we can, we use local produce,” explains Vicky. Just 200 metres down the road, the Redhill pork farmer who supplies meat for the sausage rolls also runs a market stall.cameramake Canonfocallength 18height 360fnumber 3.5exposuretime 0.0333333351camerasoftware paint.net 4.0.17originaldate 1/19/2018 3:59:36 PMwidth 640cameramodel Canon EOS 700Dlast_img read more

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A new grasp on robotic glove

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wlKDBUToPzc” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/wlKDBUToPzc/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Having achieved promising results in proof-of-concept prototyping and experimental testing, a soft robotic glove under development by Conor Walsh and a team of engineers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering could someday help people suffering from loss of hand motor control regain some of their independence.Most patients with partial or total loss of their hand motor abilities due to muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or incomplete spinal cord injury report a greatly reduced quality of life because of their inability to perform many activities of daily living. Tasks often taken for granted by the able-bodied — buttoning a shirt, picking up a telephone, using cooking and eating utensils — become frustrating, nearly impossible feats due to reduced gripping strength and motor control. The stage is now set for that to change, however, thanks to Walsh’s expertise in soft, wearable robotic systems and a development approach that involves the glove’s potential end users in every step of testing and development. The holistic approach ensures that technology development goes beyond simple functionality to incorporate social and psychological elements of design that promote seamless adoption by its end users.“From the start of this project, we’ve focused on understanding the real-world challenges facing these patients by visiting them in their homes to perform research,” said Walsh, an assistant professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering and founder of the Harvard Biodesign Lab at SEAS, and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute. A team of undergraduate students contributed to an early glove design as part of his ES227: Medical Device Design course.Wyss Technology Development Fellow Panagiotis Polygerinos and Kevin Galloway, a mechanical engineer at the institute, incorporated patient feedback at every stage of development in an effort to maximize the glove’s potential for translation.“Ultimately, patients have to be comfortable with wearing the glove,” said Galloway. “In addition to glove function, we found that people cared about its appearance, which could have a big impact on whether or not the glove would be a welcome part of their daily routine.”Walsh’s team adapted the mechanics to make the glove feel more comfortable and natural to wearers. Over several iterations of design, the actuators powering movements were made smaller and were modified to distribute force more evenly over the wearer’s fingers and thumb. The resulting soft, multisegment actuators, which are composite tubular constructions of Kevlar fibers and silicone elastomer, support the range of motions performed by human fingers. The glove’s control system is portable and lightweight and can be worn using a waist belt or attached to a wheelchair.Now, the team is working to improve control strategies that will allow the system to detect the wearer’s intent. One potential solution is to leverage surface electromyography using small electrical sensors in a cuff worn around the forearm. The electromyography sensors detect residual muscle signals fired by motor neurons when the patient attempts a grasping motion and could be used to directly control the glove.“We are continuing to test the design of the soft robotic glove on patients, in relation to making it customizable for the specific pathologies of each individual and understanding what control strategies work best — but we’re already seeing a lot of exciting proof-of-concept experimental results,” said Walsh. “The current goal is to refine the overall system sufficiently so we can begin a feasibility trial with multiple patients later this year.”Walsh and his team have been helped in their work by George Whitesides, Harvard’s Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, and SEAS’s Robert Wood, Charles River Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences, who are also Wyss core faculty members.The design of the glove has been published in the journal Robotics and Autonomous Systems and the team also recently presented it at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation. In August, the team’s electromyography control work will be presented at the International Conference on Robotics Research in Singapore.Down the road, the team is interested in developing the glove into a rehabilitation tool for various hand pathologies, and in extending the glove’s assistive functions beyond the joints in the hand toward the development of soft robotic systems that aid impaired elbow and shoulder movements, as well.last_img read more

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