12-year-old girl arrested for DWI in New Mexico

first_imgFedorovekb/iStock(ALAMOGORDO, N.M.) — A 12-year-old girl has been arrested in New Mexico for drunk driving and leading officers on a high-speed chase before losing control of the steering and smashing into a speed limit sign, officials said this week.New Mexico’s Alamogordo Police Department said the 12-year-old was driving with her three friends, ages 12 and 13, in the car.Police said the girl told them that she waited for her grandfather, with whom she was staying at the time, to fall asleep so she could take his car.Bodycam footage released by police shows officers breaking into the vehicle to get the girl and her friends out after the pursuit.The driver was charged with DWI and her friends were also charged with underage drinking.It remains unclear how the girl and her friends got the alcohol, but cans of Twisted Tea, a malted alcoholic beverage, were recovered from the car, Alamogordo Police Chief Brian Peete told ABC News.“It’s concerning,” Peete said. “We are grateful that no one was seriously hurt. But it is concerning that someone so young would put themselves and others in harms way.”The names of the youths involved have not been released, due to their age.Peete told the Alamogordo Daily News that his department is working closely with the local school system as a part of a “comprehensive approach to disciplinary action.”“We’re using a coordinated effort to get to the bottom of this,” Peete told the newspaper.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More »

ARENA launches Industry-led initiative to develop a pathway to reduce emissions

first_img ARENA launches new initiative to reduce carbon emissions. (Credit: Pixabay/JuergenPM.) Technology will be a key focus of a new initiative that brings together a number of major Australian businesses and industry stakeholders to explore pathways to reducing emissions.On behalf of the Australian Government, the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) provided $300,000 to ClimateWorks Australia to assist in the establishment of the Australian Industry Energy Transitions Initiative (ETI).The Australian Industry ETI brings together key industry stakeholders from hard-to-abate sectors to explore solutions that can help them reduce their emissions across their supply chains, and increase long term competitiveness through transitioning to clean energy solutions.Independent not-for-profit ClimateWorks, along with co-convenors Climate-KIC and research partners CSIRO and the Rocky Mountain Institute have undertaken preliminary research and will work with industry participants to develop a practical program to fill research gaps, identify challenges and develop projects for implementation.The initiative will focus on five supply chains which include iron and steel, aluminium and bauxite, liquefied natural gas, other metals (such as lithium, copper and nickel) and chemicals including plastics, fertilisers and explosives. These sectors together represent more than a quarter of Australia’s annual greenhouse gas emissions and approximately $160 billion in exports annually.Participating industrial companies in the two year initiative include BHP, Woodside, BlueScope Steel, BP Australia, Orica, APA Group, and Australian Gas Infrastructure Group (AGIG). Together, these participants account for 13.6 per cent of Australian industrial emissions. They are joined by National Australia Bank, Schneider Electric, Australian Super and Wesfarmers Chemical, Energy & Fertilisers, with more expected to join in the coming months.Alongside ARENA’s funding, the initiative is supported by philanthropic donations and company contributions. It is also supported by the Australian Industry Group and the Australian Industry Greenhouse Network.The initiative aims to set Australian industry up for a successful transition to a decarbonised global economy, by harnessing industry knowledge to accelerate emissions reductions across whole supply chains – in sectors where abatement has traditionally faced structural challenges.ARENA CEO Darren Miller welcomed the initiative’s role in uniting some of Australia’s big players in industry as they seek to work towards a common goal to reduce emissions.“Accelerating the uptake of renewable energy in the industrial sector is a critical part of helping Australia reduce our emissions. Providing industry with information and insights on energy options such as renewables and alternative fuels will also help industry meet their market needs as global demand for low carbon products grows.”“This initiative has some ‘heavy hitters’ at the table and we’re expecting the collaboration will allow for the exchange of ideas and knowledge that will benefit across sectors and supply chains,” he said.“Importantly, we also believe the ETI fits well with the goals of the Australian Government’s Technology Investment Roadmap which will provide a strategic approach to future investments in low emissions technologies,” Mr Miller said.Australian Industry ETI Chair Simon McKeon AO said collaboration, experimentation and shared knowledge would all sit at the heart of the initiative’s work.“We know that we can find solutions more quickly, and start implementing them, if we’re encouraging collaborative learning and knowledge sharing, especially when it comes to new technology,” Mr McKeon said.“This initiative provides a platform to generate knowledge and test action through on-the-ground projects that support industry to realise the opportunities of a decarbonising global economy.” Source: Company Press Release The initiative will focus on five supply chains which include iron and steel, aluminium and bauxite, liquefied natural gas, other metals (such as lithium, copper and nickel) and chemicals including plastics, fertilisers and explosiveslast_img read more

Read More »

Six Months of Hard Labor About to Begin at Dot’s and Other O.C. Businesses

first_imgJane, Sarah, Emma and Greg Rodriguez are preparing for the March 28 opening of Dot’s Pastry Shop on weekends at 31st Street and Asbury Avenue in Ocean City. By Missy RittiFor OCNJ DailyThroughout the winter months, Greg and Jane Rodriguez are familiar faces about town.  Soon enough, however, they will bid even close friends goodbye.This weekend, the couple will kick off their 14th year together behind the counter at Dot’s Pastry Shop (3148 Asbury Ave.), and in so doing embark on a schedule so grueling, only a seasonal business owner could possibly understand. Across Ocean City this month, other owners are preparing to bid similar farewells.A typical day at Dot’s, family-owned and operated since 1947, begins just as it is ending for some vacationers — at 2 a.m.“The first thing we turn on in the bakery is the coffee maker,” Greg says.  “It’s coffee, before anything else.”_____Sign up for free daily news updates from Ocean City._____The couple then get down to the business at hand — doughnut dough for him, sticky buns for her — before a doughnut fryer and an assistant arrive at 4 a.m., and remaining staff trickle in just in time for Dot’s 7 a.m. opening.  As the morning unfolds, and as a bounty of made-from-scratch breads, pies, cakes and cookies emerge hot from Dot’s ovens, Jane says that it’s important to take time for catching up with loyal patrons, like Jessica Chappell of Downingtown, Pa.“Dot’s is a highlight of every vacation, and it’s the last place my kids and I will stop on our way out of town,” Chappell says. “Some of my earliest memories of Ocean City are of splitting a cream doughnut with my grandfather. I’ve been enjoying Dot’s all my life.”It’s a common refrain.“We have customers who first came here as children, and now they’re coming in with their own kids” Jane says. “It’s a tradition for so many families and it lives on, year after year.  We’re just so appreciative because we really wouldn’t be here without these people.”Once the bulk of the baking is complete the couple will often attempt a brief nap in the afternoon, then prep for the following day before turning in for the evening, only to rise again at 2 a.m. — seven days a week during the summer, and weekends in the spring and fall.“We go hard,” Greg says “but we love it.”Because their schedule leaves little time for beach fun with daughters Emma, 12, and Sarah, 10, the couple relies on summer camps and Jane’s parents — Leo and Patricia Scheuermann, from whom they purchased Dot’s in 2000 — to make it all work.  Patricia “really becomes a second mother to my kids in the summer, so I can be here,” Jane says, while Leo — despite his retirement — still lends a hand in Dot’s kitchen.“He shows up sometimes at 4 a.m., just to help with the doughnuts,” Jane adds.Son of Valentine Scheuermann — the baker credited with crafting Dot’s famed cream doughnut recipe in Germany — and one of nine baker brothers, Leo, 83, “can still scale the dough faster than a machine” according to Jane.  “He is a master baker. The best there is.  I marvel at him, and what he can do.”Greg, Sarah, Emma and Jane RodriguezAnd while Jane is the only grandchild in her extended family to make her living as a baker today, the future of Dot’s looks bright: Emma helps wait on customers and decorate cakes in the afternoon, while Sarah “can crack a 5-gallon bucket of eggs as fast as the help,” according to Greg.Both girls “have been powdering cream donuts since they were two,” Jane adds.“I grew up in a bakery, and I love that our girls are growing up in a bakery, too,” she says. “Emma and Sarah are on our business cards for a reason.  They are a huge part of the shop.  This is a family business. It really and truly is.”Dot’s Pastry Shop opens for the season 7 a.m. Saturday, March 28.last_img read more

Read More »