2009 flu could have echoed 1918

first_imgThe 2009 H1N1 pandemic had the potential to be as deadly as the 1918 Spanish flu outbreak, which killed more than 50 million people, Canada’s chief public health officer said Monday, crediting modern medical science and public health practices for the far-lower mortality.David Butler-Jones said were it not for the development of new antiviral drugs, medical equipment like ventilators, and other advances, global deaths would have far outstripped the estimated 12,000 to 18,000 from H1N1. Butler-Jones said the H1N1 outbreak was a lot like the Y2K computer bug, where the fear that massive computer failures would result from two-digit computer clocks resetting to 1900 instead of 2000 prompted a major effort to update equipment ahead of Jan. 1, 2000. Afterward, when there was little disruption, some critics complained that the effort had never been needed in the first place.“People forgot that computers that weren’t treated did fail,” Butler-Jones said. “If the approach to public health [during H1N1] had been like it was in 1918, it would have been 1918 all over again … It was not a trivial event.”Butler-Jones discussed a variety of public health issues, from flu pandemics to the spread of obesity to U.S. health care reform, during a visit to the Center for Government and International Studies’ Knafel Building. Butler-Jones delivered a talk called “Living Forward, Understanding Backward: Transforming Public Health in the 21st Century.” The event was sponsored by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and the Center for Population and Development Studies.Butler-Jones said the world is lucky the H1N1 pandemic started in North America, where early action muted the spread of the worst strains. He also said that, although the pandemic is thought to have started in Mexico, within two days it was found coast to coast in Canada, meaning it probably had been there already. Butler-Jones said he is concerned about a more novel strain emerging, like the H5 or H7 avian flu viruses. He said that nature is the world’s “best bioterrorist,” with flu viruses potentially more easily spread and more lethal than any human anthrax attack.“The lessons from the pandemic will put us in a better position,” Butler-Jones said.The obesity epidemic is another major health concern, he said, with its companion rise in diabetes already affecting parts of the world, such as the Pacific Islands, where 30 percent of the population is diabetic. Butler-Jones questioned the effectiveness of approaches such as raising taxes on unhealthy foods, and said that, instead, the government should subsidize healthy foods, which should be placed prominently close to cash registers, with junk food in the back.“It’s not about getting rid of bad choices, but making good choices cheaper and easier,” Butler-Jones said. “There’s actually a fair bit of evidence that if people have a choice and it’s an equal choice, they will do the right thing.”Other modern challenges include how to communicate effectively with the public at a time when the channels to do so are fractured into many different streams, split among social media, the Internet, and traditional outlets.Public health has also become much more political, he said, a situation that has both advantages and disadvantages. While added prominence brings more attention to public health messages and greater funding, it also brings more expectations and scrutiny.With respect to obesity, Butler-Jones said, that means more attention from other government ministries to youth sports and recreation, as well as to how schoolchildren spend their after-school hours.As for health care reform in the United States, Butler-Jones said the size of the vested interests involved and the polarization of the opposing sides in the dispute will make it a difficult fight. The biggest challenge will be to create coalitions, which are only built on mutual respect, even among those who disagree.last_img read more

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Gold Coast family home offers modern living with a twist

first_img88 Tamworth Drive, Helensvale is a sight to behold.“We really liked the character of it,” Mr Peri said. “It’s got a lot of the older timber features and we much preferred that than a brand new home.”But the couple, who have two sons — Liam and Eli — knew they could transform the property into something spectacular.They installed the centrepiece pool, landscaped the property and had new retaining walls built. The kitchen.“We also re-did the bathrooms, repainted inside and outside, put in ducted airconditioning, new fans, plantation shutters and blinds” Ms Ahec said. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa16 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago“It’s still got the beautiful character, we just basically modernised it.”Entertaining is a breeze with the wraparound veranda, built-in barbecue area and poolside cabana. Enjoy relaxing on the deck.The house also lends itself to dual-living — the main residence on the upper level features three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a sunken lounge and billiards room.The studio, on the lower level, offers one bedroom, a bathroom and living areas. A double garage and storage area is also on the lower level. AUCTION RESULT NO-ONE SAW COMING HOMEOWNERS SITTING ON GOLDMINES 88 Tamworth Drive, Helensvale.THE unique character of this federation-style home stands out from the street.It’s exactly why Memory Ahec and Andrew Peri bought the Tamworth Drive property in 2016. There’s plenty of style throughout the house.ON THE MARKETAddress: 88 Tamworth Drive, HelensvaleAgent: Frank Gardner, Ray White Sovereign IslandFeatures: Claw-foot bath, raked ceilings, study, timber floorsArea: 1484sq mAuction: June 30, 10.30am, on-siteInspections: Saturday and Sunday, 1pm — 1.45pmlast_img read more

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Local Officials Pulling All Stops to Halt JCP&L Project

first_imgHazlet Police Lt. Scott Mura said the room capacity of 660 people was nearly reached. No JCP&L officials attended the meeting, said company spokesperson Ron Morano.“JCP&L is committed to transparency and open communication throughout this process,” he told the Two River Times in an email Wednesday. “Our outreach about the project has included three open house meetings that allowed us to provide information and exchange in productive dialogue with residents in a face-to-face setting.”A letter signed by the mayors opposing the project, addressed to Anthony Hurley, JCP&L vice president of operations, was read aloud by Mayor Aagre. It talked about the mayors’ concerns about “aesthetic degradation” and “unclear demonstration for the need of the project” along with health risks for residents, sinking property values and the impact to historical districts around the proposed area.It also carried the signatures of the mayors of Atlantic Highlands, Highlands, Keansburg, Keyport, Matawan, Red Bank and Union Beach.“This is a great sign that we have all 11 towns in the area supporting the five that are directly affected,” Aagre said during the meeting.Handlin, who was a vocal opponent to a similar JCP&L proposition back in 1989, has been regularly attending meetings against the Monmouth County Reliability Project, as it is formally known.During the meeting, she delivered a presentation how Montville, Morris County, fought back a JCP&L proposal. She noted that while the projects are not alike and the outcomes may in fact be different, this area could learn from the process Montville had gone through.Handlin also highlighted more than 30 questions that Residents Against Giant Electric (RAGE) put together for the meeting.RAGE, which started out as a simple Facebook page for residents in the affected areas to speak out, has grown into a much larger entity. Now sporting its own website, StopJCPL.org, the group plans to keep growing.“We’re in the process of incorporating right now and forming a non-profit,” said Steve Lunanuova, who has assumed the role of treasurer for the group. He predicts that in the next week RAGE will be incorporated. However, the route to becoming a non-profit organization takes more time, but Lunanuova says RAGE is looking into an expedited process.RAGE is depending on its supporters to promote their cause. With stations at two tables for the June 28 meeting, the group was selling t-shirts for $15 along with car magnets and lawn signs, both for $5 apiece. By the end of the meeting, the lawn signs were sold out.Beyond that, “there’s a GoFundMe page; people have given straight donations,” Lunanuova said. “The sales today will cover the cost of all the merchandise we purchased, and then some.”RAGE’s following has grown significantly since its inception, which was around Memorial Day weekend, according to Judy Musa, who handles public relations for the anti-JCP&L group. RAGE hosted a meeting on June 22 at the Middletown Public Library, which brought in around 340 residents. “Certainly the vast majority are from Middletown or Red Bank,” Musa said.While RAGE took the reins on the public side, Hazlet Township was the first of the five affected areas to host a special meeting about the MCRP.On June 20, both the Hazlet Township committee and Hazlet Board of Education voted to unanimously pass resolutions expressing concern about the JCP&L proposition, the first municipality to officially do so at that time.Hazlet and Middletown residents look on during an open-forum portion of the special JCP&L related meeting on June 20.In what was an open-forum style meeting, about 150 Hazlet and Middletown residents attended, while roughly 40 or so spoke on the record to the town council. Among the many speakers, the most emotional testimony came from Middletown homeowner Bernice Curto.“We are literally sick over this process,” Curto said, as tears streamed down her face.She referred towards the area of Route 1 in Woodbridge as a comparison to what the Bayshore community would soon look like, and said that “you won’t believe your eyes. These are not meant for residential areas.”Brian Christian, who lives within earshot of the rail line in Hazlet, was skeptical as to why this project is necessary.“I think they should find an alternate route, or build a substation in Red Bank instead of trying to take power from that one (Aberdeen),” said Christian, an electrician of 15 years. “Just like a generator onto the grid that can put out more power instead of dragging it from down the line.”Hazlet Committeewoman Barbara Ronchetti, who spoke out against the MCRP throughout the meeting, brought attention to other potential corridors for the project.“They had their engineers do a study of 17 routes, and they eliminated 16 of them,” she said afterwards. “But we don’t know where the 16 that were eliminated are. We need to get copies of those other ones.”Reached by phone, Morano said,  “They were talking about the site selection process. There were 17 areas that they looked at, that’s what that means,” he said. “Not specific routes for the project; necessarily as ways to do this.”Frances Haies (left) and daughter Sarah next to their information stand outside the Hazlet Township Municipal Building prior to the meeting.He also dispelled the conception that the wires could be placed underground.“There are a number of environmental concerns when undergrounding a line,” said Morano. “You have to literally disrupt the environment seriously to put a line like this underground.” He also noted that this method would cost possibly four to ten times more.Holmdel Township is the next of the affected municipalities to host a special meeting on the MCRP, which will be on July 6 at the Holmdel Township Town Hall at 7:00 p.m. Story and photos by Jay CookHAZLET – At a meeting attended by more than 600 people, leaders of 11 towns declared opposition to a $75 million power line proposal, citing concerns about health risks, aesthetics and property values.Jersey Central Power and Light Company recently announced it wants to install a new 230-kilovolt transmission line beginning in Aberdeen, then traveling through Hazlet, Holmdel, Middletown and ending in Red Bank. It would span about 10 miles along the NJ Transit North Jersey Coast Line commuter railroad right-of-way. The monopoles would hold the transmission lines and could reach 170 feet in height.“This is a true bipartisan effort to beat the big conglomerate here,” said Aberdeen Mayor Fred Tagliarini at the Tuesday night meeting.The meeting at Hazlet’s recreation center was organized by state Assemblywoman Amy Handlin who announced she is proposing legislation to prohibit transmission lines within 100 feet of any dwelling or building.“This would apply to residential, commercial, public and private property,” she said of the bill, which is modeled off a law in Iowa, considered to be the most restrictive of its kind in the nation.The bill is still in its infant stages as its continues to be drafted. The whole process could take a couple weeks, according to Handlin’s office.A packed house at the James J. Cullen Recreation Center in Hazlet on June 28. To the right, Assemblywoman Amy Handlin speaks with local elected officials.Aside from Tagliarini, in attendance were Hazlet Mayor Scott Aagre, Holmdel Mayor Eric Hinds and Middletown Committeeman Kevin Settembrino.last_img read more

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Indoor champions crown at Soccer Quest

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsDespite what Mother Nature is sending us from the skies above winter is over — meaning outside roundball soccer right around the corner.Another sign is the end of the indoor leagues at the Soccer Quest facility in Nelson.Sunday saw the conclusion of Finley’s Co-Ed and Open Leagues.In the Finley’s Men’s Open League, the Young Guns finally came of age as they outlasted Kootenay Co-op 8-6 to capture the League Championship.The title made it a clean sweep for Young Guns, which edged out Co-op for the regular season title by three points.Young Guns defeated The Action 4-1 in semi final play while Co-op edged city rival Innkeepers in the other qualifier.In the Finley’s Co-Ed League Neon Indians dumped Marshmallow Conspiracy 6-2. The win concluded a banner season for Neon, which also took home the regular season title.In Jackson’s Hole Masters, Bia Boro scored four straight times to knock off Abacus 6-3.The seesaw battle saw Bia Boro jump out to the early lead before Abacus scored three quick goals to grab a 3-2 lead.After Cam Kuch tied the game at 3-3, the victors exploded for three goals to knock off the regular season champs.Bia Boro, finishing third in the league, defeated Real Nelson 7-4 to advance to the final. It was the second straight season Real Nelson failed to capture the title.Real lost in the final last season to Jackson’s Hole.Abacus defeated fourth-place Red Dog 7-3 in the other semi final.In the final of The Bridge Ladies Rec League, Scornets built up a big 4-1 lead before holding off a late charge to defeat Creamers 10-7.Scornets, with a short bench of players, jumped all over Creamers in the early going. But just when it appeared the Creamers would overcome the early deficit, the Scornets would restore the lead.Outdoor Adult Leagues prepare of Outdoor SeasonOnce again the Adult Soccer League will be feasting on time at Lakeside Pitch during the spring and fall season.Men’s and women’s leagues in open, recreational and masters will begin competition later this month at Lakeside.For more information call Soccer Quest at 250.352-4625 or 250.551-5856 or email [email protected]@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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WHAT A VIEW HEADS A FIELD OF 12 IN SATURDAY’S GRADE III, $100,000 THUNDER ROAD STAKES; BREEDERS’ CUP WINNER TEXAS RED MAKES FIRST APPEARANCE OF 2016

first_imgTHE THUNDER ROAD STAKES IN POST POSITION ORDER WITH JOCKEYS & WEIGHTSRace 9 (of 12)     Approximate post time, 4:05 p.m. PDTPoshsky – Tiago Pereira – 124McHeat – Stewart Elliot – 120Si Sage – Mario Gutierrez – 122Cool Green – Abel Lezcano – 124Papacoolpapacool – Mike Smith – 120Decisive Edge – Brice Blanc – 120Twentytwentyvision – Flavien Prat – 120Texas Red – Joe Talamo – 122Finnegans Wake – Victor Espinoza – 122De Treville – Fernando Perez – 120Soul Driver – Tyler Baze – 120What a View – Kent Desormeaux – 124ALSO ELIGIBLE: Play Hard to Get – Alonso Quinonez – 120Ohio – Gary Stevens – 120First post time for a 12-race program on Sunday is at 12 noon. Admission gates open at 10 a.m. ARCADIA, Calif. (April 6, 2016)–Grade I winner What a View will seek his fourth win in-a-row Saturday when he runs for $100,000 in the Grade III Thunder Road Stakes at one mile on turf for older horses. Texas Red, winner of the 2014 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile will be make his first start of 2016 for trainer Keith Desormeaux and his first-ever on grass.WHAT A VIEW – Trained by Kenny Black and owned by Finish Line Racing, LLC, The Ellwood Johnston Trust, Berumen, P. and Berumen, S., What a View comes off an impressive 3 ¾ length score in the Grade I, one mile Frank E. Kilroe March 12. A winner of his last three outings since Opening Day of the Winter Meeting on Dec. 26, including a 1 1/8 mile turf allowance, the Cal Cup Turf Classic Jan. 30 and the Kilroe, the 5-year-old bay gelding by Vronsky will be seeking his fourth win of the meet. What a View will retain the services of Kent Desormeaux Saturday and will break from the far outside in post position 12. He is 11-5-2-0 overall with $532,148 in earnings.TEXAS RED – Trained by Keith Desormeaux, the 4-year-old colt by Afleet Alex who was once on the Kentucky Derby trail in 2015, returned to the work tab at Santa Anita in early February following time off from a bone bruise late last year. Fifth in his last out to Triple Crown Champion American Pharoah in the Grade I Travers in New York on Aug. 29, Texas Red will try turf for the first time Saturday. Owned by Brehm, Detmar, Michaels, Desormeaux and partners, Texas red will be ridden for the first time in eight starts by Joe Talamo instead of Kent Desormeaux who opted to stay with What a View. He is 9-3-3-1 overall with $1,767,300 in earnings.last_img read more

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