Trump’s Acceptance Speech

first_imgTrump’s Acceptance Speechby Carl ThomasDonald Trump’s acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention was too long — 75 minutes — and too loud. Modulation is the key to good public speaking. One’s voice should rise and fall like the tide, which allows really important points to be made whether the volume is low or high. His adult children are better speakers.Having said that, Trump hit mostly high notes — the country is on the wrong track. The latest Real Clear Politics data shows 69.3 percent of those surveyed believe we’re on the wrong track. One has to go back to the ’70s and Jimmy Carter to see similar numbers.Crime and violence are serious concerns. Trump promised to be a “law and order” president, specifics to come. Many believe race relations have deteriorated since President Obama took office. The police are under attack. Poor children are trapped in failing public schools and Democrats won’t let them escape. Trump and his running mate, Mike Pence, promise school choice. Terrorism is on the rise at home and overseas. Instead of focusing on battle readiness, our depleted military focuses on the inclusion of transgender and women soldiers. Veterans are not being adequately cared for.Speaking to blue collar “Reagan Democrats,” who haven’t had a significant pay raise in years, or who are unemployed or underemployed, thanks to the policies of the Obama administration, Trump said, “I am your voice.”Whether Republicans are united enough to win the election remains to be seen, but the left, the establishment and the media are united in their opposition to Trump. They claim Trump is playing on fears, but they have fears of their own; fear of losing control of government and their lucrative positions.Fear is not a bad emotion to arouse if it is based on genuine threats and there are plenty of those, as anyone paying the slightest attention can attest.Liberal media coverage and commentary on the convention was mostly the same. Friday’s headlines, editorials and columns in various publications exposed not just bias, but the fear the media have in losing their influence.Here are just a few samples: “Mr. Trump’s Apocalypse Now” (Washington Post editorial). “A Foreign Policy Wrecking Ball” (second Post editorial). “Seeking Victory by scaring the country to death” (columnist E.J. Dionne Jr.)The predictable New York Times also had a lead editorial about “Donald Trump’s Campaign of Fear.” Columnist David Brooks wrote about “The Death of the Republican Party.” Online, the column headline read “Make America Hate Again,” just in case readers didn’t get the message. A front-page “news analysis” in the Times speaks of Trump’s alleged “Failed Chance to Humanize Outsize Image.”A column by Matthew Continetti in the Washington Free Beacon was headlined “The Demagogue Rises.” Batman, call your office.Like the definition of love in the book and film “Love Story,” being a liberal means never having to say you’re sorry about your failed programs and failed philosophy. That’s because liberalism is not based on results, but on feelings and intentions. Trump is saying the left has failed and liberals don’t like the prospect of being held accountable for the damage they’ve done to America.That’s why the media will stage a love-in for Hillary Clinton and all things Democrat at their Philadelphia convention. Don’t expect a question like this: “Your party has spent huge amounts of money on the poor and yet there are about as many poor people today as when the War on Poverty began half a century ago. Same with education. Isn’t it time to try something else?”You won’t hear that question because the left thinks the problem is that government isn’t taxing, spending and regulating enough. That attitude has fueled the rise of Donald Trump and some like me, who were once skeptical of him, would like to see Trump shake up Washington, if only to watch the expressions on the smug faces of the left. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Press release: CMA to investigate ‘loyalty penalty’ super-complaint

first_imgCitizens Advice has also asked the CMA to focus on vulnerable customers, who it fears can be hardest hit.The CMA will now consider the concerns raised, and what should be done about them. This will include engagement with relevant regulators such as the FCA and Ofcom.It will publish a response within 90 days and possible outcomes include: making recommendations to government to change legislation action by sectoral regulators taking competition or consumer enforcement action launching a market investigation or market study deciding there is no action required The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) will now investigate concerns raised that people who stay with their provider – often on default or roll over contracts – can end up paying significantly more than new customers. Citizens Advice refers to this as a ‘loyalty penalty’.The super-complaint identifies five ‘essential’ markets where Citizens Advice has concerns about such penalties: In its super-complaint Citizens Advice defines vulnerable consumers as those on low incomes, older people, people with health problems and those with lower levels of formal education. We will now carefully consider the concerns raised by Citizens Advice, and any further evidence on this issue. Our response will set out the CMA’s views on this important issue and any next steps we think are needed to make sure businesses don’t take unfair advantage of their long-standing customers. The Enterprise Act 2002 (the Act) makes provision for designated consumer bodies to make super-complaints. A super-complaint, as defined by section 11(1) of the Act, is a complaint submitted by a designated consumer body that ‘any feature, or combination of features, of a market in the United Kingdom for goods or services is or appears to be significantly harming the interests of consumers’. Citizens Advice is a designated consumer body. Within 90 days after the day on which a super-complaint is received, the CMA must say publicly how it proposes to deal with it.center_img The CMA is inviting interested parties to provide any evidence which may be useful to its assessment.Find out more on the loyalty penalty super-complaint page.Notes for editors savings accounts mortgages household insurance mobile broadband This list is not exhaustive and there could be more than one outcome depending on the results of the investigation.Daniel Gordon, Senior Director at the CMA said: Enquiries should be directed to the CMA’s press team: [email protected], or 020 3738 6460.last_img read more

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TripAdvisor users select Cologne Cathedral as the most popular landmar

first_imgPhotograph: KölnTourismus GmbH / Axel Schulten The online travel portal TripAdvisor recently announced the winners of the Travellers’ Choice Award for attractions. In the landmarks category, Cologne Cathedral impressed travellers from all over the world and came in first on the list of attractions in Germany. It thus came in ahead of Neuschwanstein castle (2nd place), the German Bundestag (3rd place), the Brandenburg Gate (4th place) and the Holocaust Memorial (5th place).The winners of the Travellers’ Choice Award for attractions 2013 were determined on the basis of the quality and quantity of travellers’ evaluations of attractions in each of the categories listed on the TripAdvisor website within a 12-month period. So far, travellers from around the world have posted a total of more than 2,000 (2,059) evaluations and almost 1,600 (1,566) photographs of Cologne Cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage site, on TripAdvisor.Josef Sommer, Managing Director of the Cologne Tourist Board, is delighted by the continuing popularity of the Cologne landmark at TripAdvisor. “The first-place ranking and the many authentic travel reports from the world’s largest travel community once again underscore that Cologne Cathedral is perceived internationally as an outstanding and unique example of all the things that Germany has to offer tourists,” says Sommer. Source = Cologne Tourist Boardlast_img read more

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