US – National Whistleblower Day: Time to stop prosecuting whistleblowers as spies

first_img June 3, 2021 Find out more July 28, 2017 US – National Whistleblower Day: Time to stop prosecuting whistleblowers as spies News Organisation News to go further RSF_en United StatesAmericas Protecting sources Judicial harassmentWhistleblowers Help by sharing this information To commemorate National Whistleblower Day (July 30), Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is urging the United States government to stop using legislation meant to prosecute spies and traitors against whistleblowers who leak information of public interest to the press. The heavy-handed prosecution of whistleblowers seriously undermines the First Amendment. Follow the news on United States United StatesAmericas Protecting sources Judicial harassmentWhistleblowers Edward Snowden, the US’ most famous whistleblower, is still living in exile since he revealed the National Security Agency’s extensive surveillance of American citizens. If he ever returns home, he could face at least 30 years in prison for charges he faces under the Espionage Act. Less than six months into Trump’s term, former NSA contractor Reality Winner was arrested and charged with gathering, transmitting, or losing defense information under the same Act. The government’s charges came shortly after online news outlet The Intercept published a story featuring a leaked NSA document showing Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.Winner’s case could be the beginning of a series of leak prosecutions to come under President Trump. Yet his predecessor famously prosecuted more whistleblowers than any previous administration combined. Today, many of them are imprisoned or living in exile for what they revealed. Chelsea Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking information on the US’ human rights abuses during the ‘war on terror.’ Though her sentence was commuted before Obama left office, she had already twice attempted to take her own life during her seven years in detention. Jeffrey Sterling was found guilty of leaking information to The New York Times about an unsuccessful and dangerous CIA operation involving Iran’s nuclear program and was sentenced to three-and-a-half years in prison. His conviction was based on metadata from telephone and email conversations with Times reporter James Risen, but no direct evidence that he was a source was ever presented in court. Sterling’s prosecution almost resulted in Risen’s jailing for refusing to reveal his source. Both Manning and Sterling’s prosecutions demonstrate the disproportionate sentences whistleblowers face when compared with the vital public service they provide.“Whistleblowers who leak information of interest to the American people are being treated as if they were enemies of the state, instead of being recognized for the role they play in a healthy democracy that respects press freedom and government transparency,” says Margaux Ewen, Advocacy and Communications Director for RSF’s North America Bureau. “Leaks are the lifeblood of investigative journalism. In continuing to use the Espionage Act against whistleblowers, the US government is sending the signal that its citizens’ First Amendment rights both to report and access the news are not worth protecting when it comes to the realm of ‘national security,’ a catch-all for information the government doesn’t want revealed.”The Espionage Act was adopted in 1917 just after the US formally entered World War I and was used to prosecute individuals who shared government secrets with enemies of the US up until the prosecution of Daniel Ellsberg in 1971. A military analyst, Ellsberg gave the New York Times a classified report on US military misconduct in Vietnam, which would later be known as the Pentagon Papers. He was the first person to be charged for releasing classified information under the Act. Though his case was eventually thrown out because the government had illegally wiretapped him, other whistleblowers have not been so lucky.Leak prosecutions under the Espionage Act do not adequately protect whistleblowers. Defendants aren’t allowed to present a public interest defense, and prosecutors need only show that the leak could have harmed national security, but not that it actually did. The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression has called on Member States to do more to protect whistleblowers under the right to access information embodied in Article 19 of both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United States is clearly not fulfilling this obligation. On National Whistleblower Day, it’s time that the country of the First Amendment start celebrating the role whistleblowers play in maintaining our democracy instead of labeling them traitors and locking them up for years at a time. The United States ranks 43rd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index. WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says News News Receive email alerts June 7, 2021 Find out more April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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7 things credit unions should know about EMV

first_img 33SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Dean Nolan Vice President of Product Management and Design at Saylent Technologies, Inc.Dean leads a team responsible for setting strategic product direction and creating a premium customer experience for Saylent’s … Web: www.saylent.com Details After years of buildup, we are finally entering the home stretch for EMV deployment in the U.S. Yet, the overwhelming consensus is that the industry is still not ready for EMV. By most estimates, only 30-50% of merchants in total—and a far lower number of small businesses—are set up to meet the deadline.   Among issuers, experts estimate that less than 50% of cards will be EMV enabled by EOY, and again, the number is far lower among small issuers, like credit unions.Digging into the reasons behind these low numbers, it seems that the biggest challenge to EMV is confusion. During a recent webinar attended by small and mid-sized financial institutions 33% said they had not started on EMV deployment, and another 40% said they had started their EMV project but were not far enough along in the process to deploy cards. When asked why, almost 40% cited “market uncertainty“ as the primary factor.Looking at the recent articles on the topic, it’s no wonder folks are confused. Opinions on EMV range from those who swear that EMV is the answer to our fraud worries, to those stating that the way in which the U.S. is deploying EMV (without a PIN) is a joke, to those who say we should skip EMV all together and leapfrog to new technologies like tokenization or perhaps Bitcoins.So what is the real story? Well, four years ago when the EMV liability shifts were first announced, my former employer asked me and a few colleagues to educate the industry on EMV. Collectively, we spoke to thousands of individuals representing hundreds of issuers, merchants and processers, and in the process we figured out how to distill the complexity of EMV into a handful of fairly simple messages. With all the confusion that remains as we approach the deadline for EMV deployment in the U.S., perhaps sharing those messages again will prove helpful.EMV helps stop fraud. Specifically, EMV stops point-of-sale counterfeit fraud related to data breaches. It does this by introducing dynamic data—specific to the chip—into the transaction, which makes each payment unique. Without access to the chip, stolen card numbers from a breach become useless as there is not enough information to recreate an EMV transaction.Despite being over a decade old, EMV is still a valid technology. Chip-based payments are a big step forward from magnetic stripe payments. In addition to reducing fraud, they enable innovation by putting the power of a processing chip at the POS. One example of this is Apple Pay, which uses a chip to create tokenized payments and leverages a fair amount of the EMV specification in the process.October 2015 is the beginning, not the end. The October liability shifts are the first steps on a long journey to improve payments in the U.S. Following closely will be ATM liability shifts starting in 2016 and then a liability shift for gas pump purchases in 2017.Don’t be late. While there is little benefit to being a first mover with EMV, experience in other markets shows that being late can be a big problem. The combination of liability shift exposure and fraud migration to the path of least resistance will create financial hardships for laggards.Fast industry adoption is the key to a strong ROI. Reducing fraud means replacing magnetic stripe payments. The faster the industry adopts the technology, the better the ROI for everyone.Success requires a coordinated education effort. Using EMV to make a payment is different than using mag-stripe and will cause consumer confusion. A rapid, successful deployment requires the industry to provide a consistent message to consumers, cashiers and everyone else who will use EMV so that they are all on the same page. Educating members will be key for credit unions.EMV is not the silver bullet. While EMV will mitigate point-of-sale counterfeit fraud from data breaches, it will also drive fraudsters to look for new opportunities. These will pop up in such places as Card Not Present, ATM and online banking transactions.   The power of having a chip in the cards can help with all of these, but deterring fraud will require ongoing development and advancement by the industry.In summary, EMV is an effective tool in the battle against fraud. Additionally, moving from a mag-stripe payment ecosystem to a chip ecosystem enables a whole new set of payment capabilities. Rather than sitting on the sidelines doing nothing—and letting fraud continue to grow in the U.S.—credit unions not engaged in EMV need to start efforts to get on board.last_img read more

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Kmarin Behind Four 325,000 Dwt Bulker Orders

first_imgSouth Korean shipowning and managing company Kmarin recently ordered four very large ore carriers (VLOCs) in China, according to shipbrokers.Last week, World Maritime News reported that China’s Yangzijiang Shipbuilding won an order for two 325,000 dwt VLOCs from an unidentified Asian shipowner.Data provided by Asiasis shows that Kmarin ordered the ship duo in question. The newbuilds, to be built at the group’s Xinfu shipyard, are slated for delivery by June 2021.What is more, Kmarin has ordered a further two VLOCs of identical size at Qingdao Beihai Shipbuilding Heavy Industry in China, according to Asiasis.The VLOC pair is expected to be handed over to its owner in the first half of 2021. Kmarin will reportedly pay USD 75 million per unit.Kmarin has also two Capesize ore carriers on order at Qingdao Beihai, scheduled for completion in late 2019 and early 2020.As of June 2019, Kmarin’s fleet comprised a total of 66 vessels with a total tonnage of 7.2 million dwt, according to information provided on the company’s website.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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No. 17 Syracuse buries N.C. State with 12 3s in 80-61 win to advance to ACC tournament semifinals

first_img Published on March 4, 2016 at 10:41 pm Contact Paul: [email protected] | @pschweds GREENSBORO, N.C. — The Syracuse bench sat still as head coach Quentin Hillsman waved his arms in a circular motion, signaling his offense to speed up.The Orange had just committed four turnovers and blown a six-point halftime lead. North Carolina State had just taken its first lead in more than 19 minutes, so Hillsman wanted to play at a pace to disrupt the Wolfpack’s momentum.Alexis Peterson nailed a 3 from the corner and three minutes into the third, Syracuse reclaimed a lead it wouldn’t lose again. The SU bench that was silent just moments before rose to its feet.Five 3s — two by Peterson and three by Taylor Ford — within a two-minute span flipped the game from a two-point deficit into a nine-point lead.“I just felt a big momentum swing,” Peterson said. “We talked about coming out with effort and energy and I think when we can hit five 3s in one quarter, it just helps our momentum … I think we’re all locked in at that point.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOn the back of 12 3-pointers, No. 3 seed Syracuse (24-6, 13-3 Atlantic Coast) cruised to an 80-61 win over No. 6 seed N.C. State (20-11, 10-6) in the quarterfinals of the ACC tournament on Friday night in the Greensboro Coliseum. Peterson, Ford and 3-point specialist Brianna Butler combined for 45 points as SU overcame the early third-quarter deficit by finishing 12-of-27 from behind the arc.With the win, the Orange improved to 9-0 in games when it hits 12 or more 3s and advanced to the semifinals, where it will face No. 2 seed Louisville (25-6, 15-1) on Saturday at 2:30 p.m.SU repeatedly found Brianna Butler open for 3 and she knocked down four long balls in the first quarter. Butler’s 12 points matched N.C. State’s through 10 minutes. The country’s leader in 3-point attempts went 5-of-6 in the first half, adding another right before halftime.“It was just taking shots that were open,” Butler said, “and my teammates were getting me open and setting good screens for me.”But after Butler’s surge, the Wolfpack switched to a box-and-one to contain her. While she drew double teams when curling around screens, N.C. State’s defenders sagged off Butler’s teammates, creating shots for SU. Related Stories Cornelia Fondren guides Syracuse to win down stretch against N.C. StateGallery: Syracuse advances to ACC tournament semifinals with win over N.C. StateTaylor Ford’s status uncertain heading into ACC tournament semifinal against No. 2 seed Louisville The result was Syracuse’s third-quarter barrage that changed the game for good as the Orange relied on the 3, its bread and butter all season.“It was an amazing adjustment,” Hillsman said, “and actually we just wanted to get the ball into a scorer’s hands and Taylor really came through big.”Ford, who left the game in the fourth after rolling her ankle, only scored in double digits twice during the regular season, including SU’s biggest win against then-No. 10 Florida State. Her boost of the bench added another element to Syracuse’s offense that it didn’t have in the first half.After Peterson’s back-to-back 3s, Ford continued the push. The extent of her celebration after each make grew as SU’s lead did too. First she clapped once and got back on defense. Then she held three fingers in the air. Lastly, she jammed them into the side of her head three times with Syracuse leading, 50-41.Hillsman’s goal for each game is for his team to hit 10 3-pointers. Within five possessions, SU got halfway to that mark and put a stamp on a game that was in doubt just moments before.“We knew we had to step up and hit some big shots,” Peterson said, “and I think we got it done.” Commentscenter_img Evan Jenkins | Staff Photographer Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Watch: The spectacular catch Rashid Khan takes in BBL will blow your mind!

first_imgAdvertisement 880j4NBA Finals | Brooklyn VsfboWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E91x( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 1wtbjrWould you ever consider trying this?😱2eCan your students do this? 🌚47518Roller skating! Powered by Firework Afghanistan all-rounder Rashid Khan is proving himself as a precocious talent for whichever team he represents. Not just he is brilliant with the ball, his brutal batting down-the-order has also established him as a star in the shortest format of the game. But these days, he seems to be everywhere in the pitch with his sheer athleticism and fantastic field-work; as recently, Khan grabbed the world’s attention with some unbelievable cricket moments in this year’s Big Bash League (BBL).Advertisement On Friday, Rashid Khan was once again the MVP for his side Adelaide Strikers. In their home-game against Brisbane Heat match at the Adelaide Oval, Khan picked up a wicket in his four overs quota while conceding 15 mere runs. But the 21-year-old made a far more sensational contribution of the day, when he dismissed the dangerous Chris Lynn for 26 with a jaw-dropping piece of fielding.Advertisement Lynn was looking to slog Liam O’Connor down the mid-wicket but ended up with a leading edge and Rashid who was inside the circle on the off-side, sprinted off with the ball in his sight, dived full-stretch, and pulled off a stunner.As usual it went viral in no time with Cricket Australia’s official Twitter handle uploaded a video of the catch, and Rashid’s IPL team SunRisers Hyderabad quickly reposted it with the caption: “Rashid Khan can do anything! We repeat, Rashid Khan can do anything!!”Advertisement The Afghanistan leg-spinner has been nothing but brilliant so-far in this edition of the Big Bash League. He is the third-highest wicket-taker of the season with 15 scalps in games while Daniel Sams tops the chart with 17.The Strikers bowled out the Heat for a just 100 runs in 17 overs with Liam O’Connor picking up 3 wickets for 30 runs in his four overs. Chris Lynn (26) and Matt Renshaw (43) were the only two Brisbane players to get into double figures while the hosts easily chased down the target with 10 wickets in-hand.You may also like:Watch: KKR’s new Knight in shining armour Tom Banton smashes 5 consecutive sixes in BBL!Legendary Aussie team of the 90s reuniting for one game to raise funds to combat Aussie bushfire Advertisementlast_img read more

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