ND grads rent houses to off-campus students

first_imgIf off-campus houses were truly meant to be of students, by students and for students, then Rent Like a Champion covered every base. Landlords Drew Mitchell, Jordan Curnes and Derrick Shenk, 2001 graduates of the University, developed their housing business Rent Like a Champion (RLAC) by offering students housing options. Rent Like a Champion currently has ownership of over 40 housing properties, and they manage over 100 properties for University events such as graduation and football weekends. “First and foremost, we are different from most landlords because we were once Notre Dame students ourselves,” Mitchell said. “We uniquely understand students and the off-campus experience.” Mitchell said that the company offers students “housewarming gifts.” They provide each house with an amenity such as a flat screen TV, a custom built bar or arcade games. “Every year, the number of amenities in a house grows. We do other things which set us apart, such as providing security for free,” he said. “We are also very reasonable with the return of security deposits.” The partners created their company with the intention of providing appealing housing options as well as attempting to better the community in the areas surrounding the properties. “Despite receiving a great deal of assistance many houses had fallen into disrepair,” he said. “We believed, and still do today, that we could have a positive impact on the northeast neighborhood through investment in and rehabilitation of the housing stock.” Since its establishment in 2005, Rent Like a Champion has grown to include three primary branches of student rentals, family rentals and football rentals. Mitchell said the partners play different roles in the company. “Jordan Curnes manages marketing and drives the internship program. Derrick Shenk is responsible for property acquisitions,” Mitchell said. “I manage the properties and finances.” The rest of their team consists of two full-time maintenance staff, an office manager, a part-time manager for football season and six student managers. The student manager position, according to Mitchell, encompasses several aspects of the business, ranging from showing and leasing properties to management of the football rental business to property acquisition. “The internship experience we offer to ND students is terrific for budding entrepreneurs and can be very lucrative,” he said. “It provides up-close experiential learning with a highly successful start-up business.” Mitchell said the internship gives himself, Shenk and Curnes the opportunity to give advice to student enterprisers. The ND businessmen give guidance to students who are exploring off-campus housing options. Mitchell said he would suggest students look for housing early because the best properties often get leased quickly, two years in advance in some cases. Mitchell also advised students to compare options when looking at properties. “Living in a house gives you more freedom, space, and privacy than an apartment complex,” he said. “Ask current renters about their experience with the landlord.” Mitchell said it is important for students to make sure the landlord provides a security system, as well as explore the option of finding a property that provides furnishings, which would help students save on their expenses. For students who are experiencing issues with their current off-campus housing, Mitchell said communication with the landlord is key. “If the problem is solvable, most landlords will be very responsive — and if not, often it’s the ‘squeaky wheel that gets the grease.’ If location becomes an issue, examine your lease and try to identify ways you may be able to break it,” he said. “A phone call from your parents may be very effective.” Mitchell encouraged the Notre Dame community to get active on and around campus. Rent Like a Champion sponsors many activities through Circle K and other groups.last_img read more

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Indiana Supreme Court justices hear case at Law School

first_imgFive Indiana Supreme Court justices visited campus Monday to hear arguments for a case on their docket, swapping their regular location in Indianapolis for the Eck Hall of Law’s Patrick F. McCartan Courtroom. Kathryn Dolan, public information officer for the Indiana Supreme Court, said the justices typically hear cases in other parts of the state several times a year. “The Court traditionally goes on the road a couple times a year to here oral arguments in places other than Indianapolis,” Dolan said. “The goal behind it is to allow the press and public and students the opportunity to see the court at work.” The justices heard the arguments for Jerrme Damar Cartwright v. State of Indiana in which Cartwright was convicted of attempted battery with a deadly weapon, attempted aggravated battery and possession of a handgun by a felon. The Indiana Court of Appeals overturned his original conviction due to alleged unfair jury selection. The case was open to the public to sit in on the arguments and afterwards, students engaged in a question and answer session with Chief Justice Randall Shepard about the case and his work. “We do actually take special pleasure in the question and answer with students after the argument,” Shepard said. “There are often, as they were today, very good, very thoughtful questions about how we do our work. It gives us a chance to see people we wouldn’t normally see in Indianapolis.” Notre Dame Law School professor Lloyd Mayer recognized the Supreme Court for hearing oral arguments outside of Indianapolis and around the state. “We want to be a place to be an advantage to the court here in Indiana and also an education for the students and the greater public,” Mayer said. A 1998 Notre Dame Law School graduate, Matthew McGovern, is the defense attorney in the case. “I am trying to get the [Supreme] court to leave the remedy that the Court of Appeals issued intact,” McGovern said. McGovern said the repercussions of the case would not be felt until after the Supreme Court writes its opinion. “What it is [they want to do] we will find out when the opinion comes down,” he said. “They could really do anything. They could give me the same remedy that I got in the Court of Appeals, but clarify the opinion. They could make new law and give me what I’ve asked for, or they could give the state what they asked for.” Mayer said the chance to observe the case was an important moment outside the classroom for law students. “This makes it real for [the law students], because you do a classroom exercise, and in the back of your mind you’re always thinking, ‘Is this really how it works?’ and it feels artificial,” Mayer said. “But this is a chance to see a real argument, a real case. This case has freedom on the line.” Mayer said the fact that McGovern, Cartwright’s attorney, was a Notre Dame graduate was also very powerful. “He was a student here, and the students can say, ‘I could be that guy,’” Mayer said. “‘I could be interacting with the justices that way.’” First-year law student Elizabeth Charnowski said hearing the arguments, watching the proceedings and interacting with the justices was a phenomenal chance for a law student. “This was a great way to get exposure to the criminal law,” Charnowski said. “And it was great to hear such an important case argued in our own courtroom.”last_img read more

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Research cuts experiment time

first_imgSenior Ethan Ferguson, a biochemistry major, and a team sponsored by the Dow-Corning Company have developed a more precise mass spectrometry method for the diagnosis of porphyrias, helping streamline sample times and ultimately help in the medical and industrial fields. Ferguson said porphyrias is a group of rare diseases characterized by the overproduction and accumulation of porphyrins, or chemical precursors to the creation of heme molecules, in the biosynthetic pathway, causing neurological or skin problems. Porphyrias are uncommon, but occur occasionally due to pesticide in soil and food, he said. “Heme is an important molecule in the production of hemoglobin and is responsible for catalyzing redox reactions. It’s essential for life,” he said. “When precursors build up, they cause problems in its production.” The team’s new method cut down sample time, which helped determine the toxicology of compounds used in silicone product studies by the Dow-Corning Company much faster than the traditional method. “The existing method used High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to separate compounds, which took hours and was not very accurate. The flagship of our technique was using mass spectrometry to detect the molecules by looking at liver tissue, blood and feces samples,” Ferguson said. “Basically it operates at higher pressures to cut down on sample time.” The technique would be applicable in medical and industrial studies, he said. The rapid detection system could be easily modified to identify other classes of molecules to diagnose other diseases. “It’s an important test and an easy one where physicians can send off a blood or urine sample to rule out porphyrias as options,” Ferguson said, “or in an industry setting it would let the researchers know whether the drug compound or cosmetic product they’re developing interacts with the heme biosynthetic pathway.” Ferguson said the group was waiting for approval from the legal department at Dow-Corning before it published the research. “The manuscript is finished and ready to submit at any time,” he said. “We’re looking to see if patenting is a possibility, but once it’s in literature, it will probably be fair game.” Other industries and physician groups will adopt the study and use it well after he graduates, he said. Ferguson said the research provided valuable experience since he plans to attend medical school next year. “It’s really a rewarding thing for everyone involved,” he said. Ferguson said his advice to undergraduates is to be aggressive when looking for research opportunities and to start early. He said he began the summer after his sophomore year researching in a group led by Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Professor Jennifer DuBois. “Professors and undergrad advisors can be really helpful, but they’re busy and sometimes it’s not the first thing on their mind. Especially for science majors, you have to show you want to do it,” he said. “Like a good Notre Dame student, use your resources.”last_img read more

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Notre Dame law professor acquitted of misdemeanor invasion of privacy charge

first_imgA jury of six heard the case, but Manier granted Wruble’s motion for a direct verdict that found Smith not guilty, the Tribune reported. Notre Dame criminal law professor Stephen Smith was acquitted of a misdemeanor charge of invasion of privacy in St. Joseph Superior Court on Wednesday, according to a report from the South Bend Tribune. An Indiana State Police trooper arrested Smith after he pulled the vehicle over and discovered the no contact order. According to court records, the case is scheduled to go to trial in September, even though a judge threw out the traffic stop and evidence stemming from it. The Tribune reported that Manier wrote in March that the trooper did not have “reasonable suspicion to believe the defendant was speeding.” Tags: law professor, misdemeanor charge, St. Joseph Superior Court, Stephen Smith According to the Tribune report, Smith also faces another pending charge of invasion of privacy allegedly in violation of the same no contact order. In that case, court documents allege that Smith was riding in a car with his wife while the no contact order was in effect, the Tribune report stated. On March 21, the Indiana Court of Appeals upheld a ruling that Smith will not face the felony charge of domestic battery because the state failed to compile its case in time. He still faces a misdemeanor count of battery against his son, alleged in the same June 2011 incident, the Tribune reported. He is expected to appear in court for a hearing on that charge later this month. Court documents alleged that Smith went to his wife’s residence while the protective order was in place, but his attorney, Stan Wruble, said he drove there to pick up his children. Prosecutors accused Smith of violating a no contact order put into place after the state charged him with felony battery of his wife, but Judge Jenny Manier ruled a jury did not have evidence in order to convict, the Tribune reported.last_img read more

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Students start campaign asking University administrators to uphold previous Title IX standards

first_imgTwo Notre Dame students are starting a campaign asking University President Fr. John Jenkins to uphold previous Title IX standards in spite of recent policy changes made by Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos.Sophomore Elizabeth Boyle, one of the creators of the “StaND 4 IX” campaign, said the campaign is largely in response to DeVos’s September decision to rescind the 2011 Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) and 2014 Q&A Guidance for Sexual Assault. According to the StaND 4 IX website, the DCL “provided an interpretation of Title IX, presenting clear guidance to colleges and universities about their obligations in sexual misconduct cases,” and “clearly stated survivors’ rights.”DeVos’s decision to rescind these directives came shortly after the University’s administration made changes to Notre Dame’s Title IX policy, something Boyle said makes her “very nervous” about how the University will handle sexual assault cases in the future.“Secretary DeVos is giving schools the option to choose things such as their evidence standard [and] to follow the 60-day timeline or not, so we have this unique opportunity as this wonderful institution to take that moral high ground,” Boyle said. “ … I think that ability to choose our next steps was what inspired us to take this on and to ensure that we are this incredible university steeped in Catholic moral values, as we put out there.”Sophomore Isabel Rooper, the other creator of the StaND 4 IX campaign, said the University has made great strides in handling Title IX cases over the past several years, and the campaign asks the University to continue making progress.“Part of what we care about is making sure that the University continues moving forward,” she said. “And so that’s what we’re striving to get a commitment for with this letter, is to make sure that the University continues moving forward and making good on that promise to support and protect survivors of sexual violence, and have a fair and reasonable process.”Boyle said one of her biggest concerns about the rescinding of the DCL is the removal of the Preponderance of Evidence standard — which requires complainants to prove an incident of sexual assault is “more likely than not” to have occurred — and the removal of a 60-day timeline for investigating and concluding Title IX cases.The 60-day timeline is the typical timeframe identified in the DCL for how long a Title IX case should take to resolve. While the timeline was not strongly enforced before DeVos rescinded the DCL, Boyle said the only thing that could hold the University to that standard is community members speaking up on behalf of survivors.“Now I think the biggest push is going to come from student activists,” she said. “[It will come] from saying, ‘Hey, if you’re having a case that’s over 100 days long, you’re re-traumatizing the victims of assault, you’re putting them through this process again.’ So the difference is going to be in saying … that Notre Dame has this choice, and we pride ourselves on making the right choice, the choice that has the higher morality and protects people.”Notre Dame has conducted investigations that have lasted longer than the 60-day timeline while the DCL was in place, such as a case that resulted in an ongoing lawsuit from a former student. Rooper said the campaign asks the University to recommit to the 60-day standard in order to minimize the trauma for all parties in a Title IX investigation.“We understand that there are sometimes extenuating circumstances that make it difficult for a university to complete an investigation within 60 days,” she said. “ … But the goal of having the University commit to that timeline … is to be able to hold the University accountable and say Title IX investigations are really difficult [for] the complainant and the respondent alike, and containing that investigation as much as we can will be beneficial for all parties involved in Title IX cases.”The campaign, which will send an open letter to Fr. Jenkins on Nov. 17, also asks the University not to resort to mediation in cases of sexual misconduct and calls for the creation of waivers for the six-semester housing requirement so that “survivors of sexual misconduct and other forms of discrimination” can move off-campus.“Ideally, what we would like to see is a waiver system that doesn’t require the victim survivor to share their story in order to be able to move off campus,” Rooper said. “ … We think that that’s a form of re-traumatization for victims and asking too much of persons who have already been ostracized or felt excluded from our community in some way.”This request extends beyond Title IX to issues of discrimination against groups such as racial minorities and the LGBT community, Boyle said.Rooper stressed that everyone can contribute to this campaign, and said sexual misconduct “isn’t a partisan issue.”“This is something that we should all be on the same page about and that we should all decide that we need our university to commit to a fair process which will support survivors,” she said. “ … People can have differing opinions on what we’re working on, but we think it’s really important that people consider what’s happening nationally, because this is a really big and significant time for Title IX changes right now and people need to pay attention.”Tags: Betsy DeVos, Fr. John Jenkins, sexual assault, StaND 4 IX, Title IXlast_img read more

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University announces next vice president of new business development

first_imgScott Ford, an executive vice president for Bradley Company of South Bend, will be the next associate vice president of new business development at Notre Dame, according to a University press release published Jan. 25.Ford, a Notre Dame alumnus, will work with several University departments — such as Notre Dame Research, the IDEA Center, University Relations and the Office of Public Affairs and Communications — to promote economic development benefiting both Notre Dame and the broader South Bend community, the release said.According to the press release, Ford will take over the position from Jack Curran, the first person to hold it.“Jack brought a broad set of skills in strategic planning and business development, as well as extensive experience in identifying and creating business opportunities that foster growth,” executive vice president John Affleck-Graves said in the press release. “Scott will build on the progress that Jack made.“Scott brings a deep understanding and knowledge of Notre Dame and our greater community. His experience in the public and private sectors will be vital to Notre Dame’s continuing efforts to spur regional growth.”In addition to his time at Bradley Company, Ford has also previously served as the executive director of community investment in South Bend city government, the press release said. During his tenure, he restructured the city’s economic development strategies, resulting in “nearly 2,600 new announced jobs and $440 million in new private investment to the city,” according to the release.Ford said he is excited to work with the University to expand economic opportunities in South Bend and bring new resources and ideas to the broader community.“The University of Notre Dame is a dynamic engine for our economy,” Ford said in the press release. “And yet there exists further untapped potential to connect the talent, ideas and resources on campus with those in the community to expand economic opportunities and improve the quality of life across the region.“I am grateful for this tremendous opportunity to join the University in its ongoing efforts and leadership in the region.”Ford graduated from Notre Dame with a master’s degree in architecture after earning a bachelor’s degree in government with a concentration in philosophy, politics and economics, the release said. It also said he also left the University of Cambridge with a master’s degree in planning, growth and regeneration.According to the release, Ford is an active member in the South Bend community, serving on the board of the St. Joe Valley Metronet, enFocus and Downtown South Bend, in addition to formerly serving on the boards of the South Bend Urban Enterprise Association, Community Home Buyers Association, Economic Development Commission and the Industrial Revolving Loan Fund.Tags: business, New Business Development, Scott Fordlast_img read more

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Bagpipe band grounded in new and old tradition

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Dominic Vachon The Notre Dame bagpiping band. pictured, began in 1949. The band plays at several University events throughout the year.“The original band didn’t last long because the bagpipes had to be let go for several reasons,” faculty co-advisor of the band, professor Dominic Vachon said.Vachon explained that bagpipes cannot last for long in weather below 40 degrees because the reeds start freezing. “In those days, the bagpipes would lock up after staying in the stadium all that time,” he said.The size of the band also created issues, Vachon said.“The other problem then was that there were only eight or nine Irish Guard, and eight or nine pipers does not fill that stadium,” Vachon said. Finally, Vachon said, the way the band recruited bagpipers created issues.“The third reason, which we know from Lee Tavis, a professor emeritus, was the original way they chose pipers in the Irish Guard,” Vachon said. “They went through the band and drafted people to be bagpipers. And that’s not a great way to get people to learn an instrument.”So they kept the Irish Guard and got rid of the bagpipes. Years later, then-student Paul Harren formed the band that Notre Dame knows today. Vachon became an advisor to the band about a year after its existence. The band started playing in front of the Knights of Columbus area before the football games with a case open to receive donations. “Pretty quickly we were able to afford kilts,” Vachon said. But the administration soon made the decision that it was appropriate for the band to wear the Notre Dame tartan at Notre Dame functions. “The tremendous enthusiasm of Notre Dame football fans is what made us into a tradition,” Vachon said. Nowadays, the band is comprised of faculty, staff and students of Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross. Longstanding co-advisors to the group are Vachon and professor Dan Gezelter. Sophomore Tom Garvey is serving his first year as pipe major. Garvey said there is a core group of five pipers and three drummers in the band this school year. Though faculty and staff are in the band, it is student-run. “When [Gezelter] and I are in the band, we are each one of the pipers,” Vachon said. “The students make the decisions about performances.” Additionally, Garvey and Gezelter said for various games people will join them on game days. “We’ve even had prospective students come and play with us,” Gezelter said. “Even if they don’t know many of the songs, we are happy to have them dress up and stand with us while we play,” Garvey said.The band plays many times throughout the year, but the three main events are the the pre-game show under or in front of the dome, the player walk and the St. Patrick’s day parade each year in Chicago. The band is also often asked to play at tailgates and other special events. The player walk just recently became a tradition. “When coach [Brian] Kelly first started, he called us up and asked if we could pipe the players into the stadium. We thought it was a one-time event, but we were thrilled to do it,” Vachon said. “The next home game we were sitting around, and coach Kelly called the pipe major and asked if we were piping the team in again.”The band has escorted the team from Hesburgh Library to the stadium ever since to the same three tunes Kelly first requested: “The Minstrel Boy”, “Kelly the Boy from Killane” and “Mairi’s Wedding.”“We didn’t use to do player walks or play under the dome but once we do them a couple times in a row everyone expects them,” Gezelter said.Vachon said he thought Kelly must have had a sense of the purpose of bagpipes. Vachon said they are best used for processing people in, or in this case, marching them to victory. Thus, the tradition of the player walk was born. “You don’t realize you’re part of a tradition until you’re right in the middle,” Vachon said. In the spring, the band will make their annual trip to Chicago to play in the St. Patrick’s day parade. But before the parade, which is sponsored by the Plumbers Union, the band plays on the boat that dyes the river green, Garvey and Gezelter said. The band is always looking for new members regardless of experience. Garvey, Gezelter and Vachon encourage anyone interested to stop by practice on Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. or Sundays at 2:00 p.m. “We’ve had a number of people though who just picked it up right when they got here or they knew another instrument,” Vachon said.To be a part of the band is to be a part of tradition, Garvey said.“Bagpipes really tie us back to our Celtic roots,” Garvey said. “We call ourselves the Fighting Irish. It makes sense that we are really showing all our sides of being Irish even though we play Scottish pipes.” Catch the band’s performance Saturday at 3:30 p.m. inside Main Building under the dome or at 5:15 p.m. in front of Hesburgh Library for the player walk to the stadium. Tags: bagpipe band, Football Friday Feature, Irish Guard, player walk Many deem the player walk from Hesburgh Library into the stadium before game time an iconically Notre Dame experience. This tradition, however, is relatively new. The first bagpiping band at Notre Dame originated from the Irish Guard in 1949. But the bagpiping band Notre Dame knows today is not the same.last_img read more

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Students look ahead to March for Life 2019

first_imgWhen senior Matt Connell looks back on his previous experiences at the March for Life, one of the most poignant moments occurs every year toward the end of the March on Constitution Avenue. Passing the Capitol Building, as the road slopes upwards towards the steps of the Supreme Court, he recalls turning around at the top of the hill in awe of the seemingly endless stream of marchers behind him, all bearing witness to the pro-life movement.“There is no way you can feel alone in the pro-life movement after experiencing that,” Connell, vice president of communications for the executive board of the Right to Life Club, said. “It serves as a reminder of the strength and vitality of the pro-life movement in our nation, and it is a sign of hope that we will ultimately build a culture of life that respects all life, including the unborn.”This Friday, Connell, along with around 850 Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students, faculty and staff, will again make the journey to Washington D.C. to participate in the 46th annual March for Life.Notre Dame Right to Life — the largest club on campus — organizes the trip each year with support from the de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture. The Right to Life club also offers a variety of pro-life events throughout the year, Connell said, including group prayer services and service events, which include free babysitting for graduate students with children, educational lectures about the pro-life movement and more.“There’s a lot of really serious attacks on life in our nation and around the world, chief among them abortion,” Connell said. “It’s really important to bear witness to the dignity to every human life and remind people what a gift it is to have life.”This year, 16 buses will depart from campus Thursday night, senior and March for Life team coordinator of the Right to Life club Dan Lindstrom said. Due to a predicted snowstorm, all buses will leave D.C. on Friday night and return to campus Saturday morning.The annual trip to the March for Life is the largest student event on campus. Lindstrom said that the group is encouraging 2019 attendees to think of the trip as a pilgrimage.“It’s really uncomfortable,” Lindstrom said. “Bussing through the night twice and staying on a parish gym floor isn’t glorious. Officially giving it the title of pilgrimage gives people the right direction for how they should view what they’re doing.”Lindstrom said he hopes that students on the March will experience a spiritual awakening in spreading the pro-life message.“Giving it the more spiritual aspect, the goal is to open hearts,” Lindstrom said. “It’s not only opening the hearts of pro-choice people, it’s to open the hearts of the people on the March too.”In addition to students, around 75 Notre Dame faculty and staff will be in attendance at the March, including University President Fr. John Jenkins. Jenkins will march with the Notre Dame cohort and preside over a mass for Notre Dame affiliated marchers on Friday morning at St. Agnes Parish in Arlington, Virginia.Petra Farrell, who has served as the culture of life program manager at the de Nicola Center since 2017, said that the center offers transportation reimbursement and assistance with lodging for faculty, staff or graduate students who wish to attend the march.The number of student participants fluctuates throughout the years, Farrell said, but the record for attendees was set in 2018 with over 1,000 Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross student participants.The theme of the 2019 March for Life is “Unique from day one: pro-life is pro-science,” which Farrell, Connell and Lindstrom all believe fits very well with Notre Dame’s identity as a Catholic University.“A lot of people often think of the pro-life movement as a really religious movement, and sure, there are a lot of religious people within the movement, but it’s not only animated by the religious background of its members but also by science, by reason, by philosophy and all sorts of disciplines that go into creating a holistic view of the pro-life position,” Connell said.“Science does show that life begins at conception,” junior Morgan Chichester, president of the on-campus pro-life group Belles for Life, said.Chichester acted as a promoter and liaison between the Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame groups in order to ensure that Belles were present on the March.“I am very passionate about being pro-life and understanding the real reasons, and how to argue with someone who is pro-choice. [It] is very important and I feel like you learn a lot of information by going on a trip like this,” College freshman Rachel Ledyard said. “I also feel like there is power in numbers and it is amazing how many people show up to events like this and how moving that is.”Freshman Keely Carney will be joining her on the trip but for less analytical and more passionate reasons.“I feel like there is a flame or a candlestick inside my heart about this and I want to ignite that flame and light it, so that I am so passionate and so on fire for it that this something that I can truly strongly stand up for for the rest of my life because it is something that I believe in,” Carney said.The students planning to go shared emotions of excitement and empowerment. Chichester wanted to provide an avenue for girls to express their political, religious and moral opinions.“I am excited that girls want to take a stand on this and I hope that it makes change,” Chichester said.The March for life Rally, which proceeds the march itself, takes place at the National Mall and features speeches by politicians and activists.“At the March you will hear testimonies from people who either went through an abortion and figured out that that was not the right decision or people who said no to that and really went after life,” Chichester said.Chichester sees the pro-life stance as not only protecting those in the womb, but all people facing undignified and vulnerable lives in today’s world.“This is shining a light on the issue of abortion, but is also promoting the beauty and dignity of life to be valued. It is shining a light on it, it’s getting people together to create change whether that is legislatures or just in people’s hearts,” she said.The students attending the March for Life are fulfilling the Saint Mary’s core values, especially justice, Chinchester said.“We are fighting for justice for those who do not have a voice. That is something that Saint Mary’s stands for the vulnerable the marginalized,” Chichester said.Throughout the weekend, speakers for the program include both Republican and Democratic congressmen, in addition to former Planned Parenthood director Abby Johnson, Ben Shapiro and Archbishop Joseph Naumann, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops pro-life committee, among others.“As one of the most reputed institutions of higher learning that’s Catholic, I think we have an obligation to show how much Catholic teaching and reason fit with one another,” Lindstrom said.For students unable to attend the March for Life in D.C., a prayer service organized by the Alumni Association will be held at the Grotto at 12:30 p.m. on Jan. 28.Editor’s note: A previous version of this article incorrectly stated where the March for Life begins. The march starts on Constitution Avenue between 12th and 14th Streets and ends at the Supreme Court.Tags: 2019 March for Life, ND Right to Lifelast_img read more

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University announces 2019-2020 leprechaun lineup

first_imgThe leprechaun lineup for the 2019-20 school year has been determined the “most diverse roster” ever, the Notre Dame cheerleading program announced Tuesday.Junior Samuel Jackson and sophomores Conal Fagan and Lynnette Wukie will all act as the University’s mascot for the upcoming year, ringing in the most diverse group since the leprechaun became the official mascot in 1965.Jackson and Wukie will be the second and third African Americans to hold the role, and Wukie will become the University’s first female leprechaun.Fagan, who is from Derry, Northern Ireland, will enter his second season in the job.“Each bring their own strengths and personalities to the role, and I’m excited to see them represent Notre Dame on the sidelines next season,” head cheerleading coach Delayna Herndon said in the release. “As such a visible representative of Notre Dame, the leprechaun is a role model to fans across the country, and we hope this group can inspire people of all backgrounds to see themselves as a vital part of the Notre Dame family.”Jackson, a native of Alabama and a resident of Keough Hall on campus, said Mike Brown — Notre Dame’s first African American leprechaun and current regional director for athletics advancement — and his history with the role prompted his interest.“When I first came here, I was a big Notre Dame fan, but I didn’t have the history or legacy that my friends did,” Jackson said in the release. “Being able to make my own experiences and memories here at this University and to be able to represent it — especially as a senior — is just the best feeling. I feel like I have solidified my presence and voice, and am now etching it into the very fabric of the University.”Fagan, during his time as a 2018-19 mascot, has helped cheer on a wide variety of sports and accompanied the women’s basketball team to the Final Four. A resident of St. Edward’s Hall on campus, Fagan was a walk-on for the Irish men’s soccer team before taking on the role of being the leprechaun during his sophomore year. As the first native Irishman to hold the job, Fagan said he was unsure how excited he would be in the job at first because mascots and cheerleading are not a part of the culture in Ireland.“I’m really honored to be back,” Fagan said in the release. “When I first took up the leprechaun role, I didn’t know how much I would be excited by it and invested in it because back home mascots and cheerleading isn’t really a thing. Coming here and experiencing it first-hand is such a special thing to me and I think people can see that as well. Every time I put the suit on, it feels like I’m Superman or something, so it’s pretty special.”A sophomore in Pasquerilla West Hall and an Ohio native, Wukie said she has a “need to lead.” The release said Wukie recognized her potential status as a role model since she would be the first female leprechaun.“I talked about being a role model (during the tryout process) because even through high school and into college, it’s always been important to me to be someone people can look up to,” Wukie said in the release. “I think I hadn’t (yet) found that thing, like I wasn’t fulfilling my true purpose here to be that face and that role model, so when this opportunity came about I thought it was destiny. This is what I’m meant to be doing. … My rector told me, ‘Little girls are going to want to be you,’ so to be that role model for young women is really special.”Tags: Diversity, football, Leprechaun lineup, Notre Dame leprechaunlast_img read more

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Local filmmaker visits College art classes, shares creative process

first_imgTo give voice to the voiceless. To tell stories that have meaning. To provide a platform for the compelling tales of the people around us. These are the reasons Chuck Fry became a filmmaker.Fry visited two Saint Mary’s art classes Tuesday afternoon to share his own story and the process behind his work. The Los Angeles native attended Bethel College and earned a degree in journalism. After working for various newspapers, Fry said he realized that he no longer enjoyed what he was doing. He then moved back home and discovered his current passion.Fry said he found he could take what he enjoyed about print journalism — writing feature stories where his “words were causing [a] reaction” — and apply it to something else he loved: movies. He sees videos as a way to visually tell stories that can impact his viewers like those feature stories he wrote did.“After a big change in my life, I really felt my true calling. I don’t really know how to put this, but I just really like to tell, kind of sweet, like sensitive, like sentimental kind of stories,” Fry said. “I think there are stories everywhere. A lot of these stories really tell themselves. I think I’m just kind of a catalyst to kind of push these stories out.”Fry still finds inspiration through newspapers, as he did after moving back to South Bend. Fry discovered a South Bend Tribune article about a man who repaired and sold bikes from his garage and wanted to tell that same story on a different platform. With help from the Grotto Network and his crew, Fry created a short video telling the story of Charles “The Bike Man” Jenkins.“This piece still gets me emotional. You know, like even watching it this morning before I came and talk to you guys, I still get moved by this man. And I don’t know why,” Fry said. “This guy obsesses about helping people. And that is rad. I think I tell a lot of these stories like I said because I want to be like these people. And I can’t. I really, really, really fall short. But I think I can tell a story.”After the video circulated, members of the South Bend community reached out to Fry to contact Jenkins, whether it be to raise money or donate bikes to him.“I just think that that’s awesome, over a little, just something that I made honestly down in my basement,” he said.Following the Bike Man video, Fry said someone asked how he got the idea to tell Jenkins’ story visually after reading it in the paper.“I don’t know. That’s just the way I’ve always been, I can’t teach you guys to tell you guys how to do that,” he said. “I think you guys will probably like that or not, like, that’d be a great story. There’s got to be a story there. When you drive by somewhere weird, or you hear something, you know, and I just think really too, if it just kind of strikes an emotional chord, and those sick visuals too. I can’t stress that enough, either.”Fry encourages new filmmakers to examine those around them to find compelling stories to be told and people to be interviewed for documentary-style videos.“Who would you guys interview? Is there kind of that kitsch, kind of interesting story in your life or your family’s life? You’re like, dang, that would be such a good story,” he said. “Oh, my gosh, there’s someone at my church, my roommate, she can blah, blah, blah, you know what I mean?”A self-proclaimed “sensitive dude,” Fry said he leans into his emotions to create his content.“I used to think that there was something wrong with me, but there’s not,” he said. “I use that, and I really put that passion and sensitivity into the stories that I tell. I really invest in my subjects.”Fry said he could head to bigger cities for bigger work, but for now, he’s happy with South Bend.“There are so many little sweet stories here,” he said. “I’m quite content.”Tags: Filmmaking, video artlast_img read more

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