Howard Rubenstein, press agent who repped stars and real estate elite, dies at 88

first_imgHoward Rubenstein (Getty)Howard Rubenstein, a legendary figure in public relations who represented the power players of New York, died Tuesday in his Manhattan home. He was 88.His lengthy list of clients included real estate firms, celebrities, politicians, corporations and cultural institutions. Among them were Donald Trump, Rupert Murdoch, the late Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, Columbia University, the Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic, according to the New York Times.“I will remember him for his unwavering code of ethics, which earned him the trust of real estate moguls, developers, politicians, and celebrities all over the world,” said Bess Freedman, CEO of Brown Harris Stevens, one of Rubenstein’s clients. “He left an indelible mark on the real estate industry, on New York City, and on the many people he helped along the way.”Rubenstein spoke with a soft voice and strived to do his job with dignity, often preaching ethics in articles and speeches on public relations, the paper reported.“When you have a crisis, you first have to ask, what’s the right thing to do and say?” he told the Times in 1995. “Not what kind of spin can we put on, but what’s the right thing to do. You don’t let the facts dribble out. Sometimes you do it by holding a news conference. Other times you do it with a written statement, depending on how the client feels or the ability of the client to conduct himself or herself in a tough situation.”Read moreEastern Consolidated founder Peter Hauspurg diesGerald Hines, developer who changed Houston’s skyline, dies at 95Jerry Wolkoff, prolific New York developer, dies at 83 Share via Shortlink Rubenstein was born in Brooklyn on Feb. 3, 1932, to Samuel and Ada (Sall) Rubenstein. He graduated from Midwood High School and the University of Pennsylvania, where he majored in economics.Upon dropping out of Harvard Law School after two months, he learned public relations from his father, a journalist, and launched his eponymous firm from his kitchen table in 1954. He earned a law degree from St. John’s University five years later but continued his agency, building it into one of the city’s most prestigious PR shops.He is survived by his wife Amy Forman, along with three children, Roni, Richard, and Steven Rubenstein, and seven grandchildren. David, another child, died in 1971 at the age of nine.[NYT] — Sasha Jones Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink TagsCelebrity Real EstateCommercial Real EstateObituariesResidential Real Estatelast_img read more

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Macy’s to close 4 tri-state locations in next few months

first_imgMessage* The retailer plans to shutter 37 locations across the United States by the middle of 2021, and will ultimately close 125 stores by 2023. And some of those are large properties: The brand is letting go of its 170,000-square-foot flagship along Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. The closures are part of the brand’s larger efforts to consolidate stores as Macy’s shifts to smaller, off-mall locations and focuses on e-commerce. It will also open more fulfillment centers in order to accommodate online orders.Department stores have struggled this year as pandemic-mandated lockdowns shuttered locations, mall foot traffic diminished and e-commerce trends accelerated. Macy’s rival JC Penney filed for bankruptcy, only to be saved later by Simon Property Group and Brookfield Asset Management.Contact Sasha Jones Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Full Name* Macy’s at Sangertown Square in New Hartford (Google Maps)Macy’s may no longer be the “way to shop” for some residents of the tri-state area.Four of the department store’s mall locations will close in the first quarter of 2021. Those stores are located in Sangertown Square in New Hartford, New York; White Plains Galleria in Westchester County, New York; Brass Mill Center in Waterbury, Connecticut; and Crystal Mall in Waterford, Connecticut.Another location, in Commack, New York, shut its doors in the second quarter of 2020.Read moreMacy’s experiments with “dark stores”Mag Mile Macy’s closes as retailer shifts to smaller storesJ.C. Penney has been saved. Now what?center_img Share via Shortlink Email Address* TagsCommercial Real EstateMacy’sRetail Real Estatetristate-weeklylast_img read more

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Silicon Valley’s Founders Fund inks Miami lease

first_img Full Name* Founders Fund’s investments include SpaceX, Airbnb, Facebook, Palantir Technologies and Postmates.Adam Bernstein of JLL represented Founders Fund in the office lease. Danet Linares and Andres Del Corral, along with Tere Blanca, represented the landlord, New York Life Investors. Uber has been a tenant since 2015, and other tenants include the Beacon Council and the South Florida Business Journal.Discover International, a biotech and sciences recruitment firm, also secured a lease for nearly 4,900 square feet at the 288,000-square-foot building. Brad Dinneen of Stiles represented the tenant.Contact Katherine Kallergis 1MBDBeverly HillsJho LowLA luxury real estate Email Address* Message* Founders Fund partners Peter Thiel and Keith Rabois (Getty/Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)Founders Fund, the major Silicon Valley venture capital firm with billions of dollars in capital under management, is planting a flag in Miami.Founders Fund inked a one-year lease at Brickell City Tower at 80 Southwest Eighth Street, taking 2,073 square feet at the Brickell office building, according to a press release from Blanca Commercial Real Estate.PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel, a founding partner of the venture capital firm, and Keith Rabois, a general partner and a member of the “PayPal Mafia,” both purchased Miami Beach homes in recent months. Rabois, a co-founder of Opendoor, paid $29 million for a Venetian Islands mansion in December, and Thiel paid $18 million for two adjacent homes, also on the Venetian Islands, months earlier.Rabois is among the tech investors who have been vocal about his admiration for Miami and Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, who has been working to attract Big Tech on social media. Suarez’s viral moment occurred in December when he responded to Delian Asparouhov’s tweet proposing moving Silicon Valley to Miami, asking “How can I help?” Asparouhov is a principal at Founders Fund.Read moreParadise found: Can Francis Suarez make Miami the next Big Tech mecca?Plug and Play to open downtown Miami officeSoftBank to invest $100M in Miami startups Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Tagslast_img read more

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SALT shakeup: Democrats pressure Biden to repeal tax cap

first_img Full Name* Message* “We were willing to briefly postpone discussions of this subject,” the group wrote in the letter, which was obtained by the publication. “Given the gravity of this issue for our constituents, however, we must ask to open a dialogue with you immediately about including SALT relief in the upcoming infrastructure package.”The $10,000 cap on SALT deductions shook the real estate industry when it was first enacted in 2017. However, the chilling effect on buyers appears to be thawing, according to a recent report in The Real Deal.Some liberal groups and House Democrats, however, argue that repealing the SALT limit would largely help the wealthiest families, saving them tens of thousands of dollars annually. A Brookings Institution study last year showed 57 percent of the benefits would go to the top 1 percent of homeowners — an average of $33,100 each. One-quarter of the savings would go to the top 0.1 percent of taxpayers, who would save nearly $145,000 per year, on average.While 96 percent of the repeal’s savings would go to the top fifth of earners, the middle 60 percent of earners would save an average of $27 annually, Brookings found. But the calculations assumed no offsetting changes in tax rates would be made at the same time.Repealing the deduction would cost nearly $89 billion in 2021 alone.[Politico] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Clockwise from top left: Rep. Mikie Sherrill, Tom Suozzi, Bill Pascrell, Josh Gottheimer and President Joe Biden (Getty)As President Joe Biden unveils a multi-trillion-dollar infrastructure proposal this week, House Democrats are calling on him to repeal the Trump-era limit on state and local tax deductions, or SALT.Rep. Tom Suozzi, who represents parts of Queens and Long Island, along with Reps. Mikie Sherrill, Josh Gottheimer and Bill Pascrell of New Jersey, have publicly stated that they want to see SALT reinstated in the upcoming package, Politico reported. The legislators went so far as to say they’d oppose future tax increases without a restoration of the SALT deduction — and privately, other legislators reportedly share the sentiment.Eleven democrats on the Ways and Means Committee sent a letter to Biden calling for the addition to the upcoming infrastructure package.Read moreIs the tax overhaul law impacting real estate?The suburban S.A.L.T. shakeoutSchumer v. McConnell on SALT: Who’s gonna give? Tags Share via Shortlink Email Address* Joe BidenReal Estate and PoliticsReal Estate Taxeslast_img read more

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Krill

first_imgThis series of papers comprises contributions to a symposium on the geography of the Falkland Islands, held at the Royal Geographical Society on 18 May 1982, with Lord Shackleton in the Chair. Armed incursion into the Islands by Argentinian forces in April 1982 led to an increased interest in a comparatively little known British possession, though the Report on the Economic Survey of the Falkland Islands (review, Geogrl J. 143, 2: 282-85) in 1976 made by Lord Shackleton and a team of experts, and their lecture here in that year (Geogrl J. 143, 1: 1-13), meant that the economic prospects for the Islands had already been discussed at the RGS. The present series of papers covers the political and legal aspects of the British claim to the Falklands, the history, physical geography and the present social scene, an updating of the earlier proposals for improving the Islands’ economic prospects, and papers on the need for the conservation of resources, the sheep farming potential, and the economic possibility of krill fishing. Since this symposium was held, however, Lord Shackleton and his team have made a revised study of the economic and social aspects of the Falkland Islands, and have made new recommendations. These are the subject of a new Report: Falkland Islands: Economic Study 1982 (HMSO), of which a review appears on p. 73 of this issue.last_img read more

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Summer-season mesoscale cyclones in the bellingshausen-weddell region of the antarctic and links with the synoptic-scale environment

first_imgResults are presented from the first investigation into a summer-season of mesoscale vortex activity in a large sector of the Antarctic coastal region. The study is based on an analysis of 3 months’ meteorological satellite imagery collected at the British Research Station ‘Rothera’ on the Antarctic Peninsula. The study revealed the high frequency with which such systems occur, with 162 individual vortices being found during the period December 1983 to February 1984 inclusive. The preferred area for their development was in the latitude band 60–70°S over the marginal ice zone and ice-free region of the eastern Bellingshausen Sea. A classification scheme for the vortices was developed based on the relationship with the broad-scale synoptic flow, the sea ice, and the geographical location. The most common type of vortex found was the ‘classic’ polar low, which formed in the southerly flow to the west of synoptic-scale disturbances. These vortices were very similar to the baroclinic type of polar lows observed south of Iceland during the Northern Hemisphere winter. A third of the vortices in total were found to be mesoscale features associated with synoptic-scale troughs or the centres of major depressions. Vortices with comma-shaped cloud signatures occurred about twice as frequently as those with spiraliform cloud. The vast majority of vortices had a diameter of less than 500 km, with very few systems being observed in the range 500–1000 km. Mean anomalies of 500 hPa geopotential height and surface pressure for the occasions when vortices were identified were —5.3 dm and — 0.5 hPa, respectively, indicating the association of these systems with upper air troughs and cold pools. Only 23 of the vortices found were correctly represented on the Meteorological Office analyses and of these 15 were small synoptic disturbances. The ‘polar low’ class of vortex was very poorly represented in the analyses, indicating that the available satellite sounder data could not resolve the systems and that the processes resulting in their formation were not handled well by forecast/data assimilation schemes. Comparison of the mean surface and 500 hPa height fields for this 3-month period with the long-term average data show that there were negative anomalies at both levels over the Bellingshausen Sea. The number of vortices over the Bellingshausen Sea in this summer period may have been greater than would be expected in an average year, but activity over the Weddell Sea was probably close to average.last_img read more

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The behavioural and physiological ecology of diving

first_imgRecent measurements of remarkable dive performances in oceanic seabirds and marine mammals suggest the use of a range of physiological and behavioural adaptations for the parsimonious use of oxygen. Access to food at different depths may be directly related to the duration of the breath-hold, and several physiological strategies may be used to extend dive duration. But is also a growing appreciation of the importance of behavioural strategies adopted by divers to minimize the effects of physiological limitations on diving performance and to maximize access to food.last_img read more

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Aerial transport of keratinaceous substrate and distribution of the fungus Geomyces pannorum in Antarctic soils

first_imgAerobiological sampling was conducted year-round at three sites on Signy Island, maritime Antarctic, between December 1992 and January 1994, and during the summer at a fourth coastal site. The concentrations of keratinaceous particles were monitored. Feather fragments were the most abundant of all particle types trapped. Seal hairs were also common, particularly on the coast. Numbers of both particle types were most common in the air in summer. The Antarctic soil fungus Geomyces pannorum, which is able to utilize keratin-based substrates, was also present in aerobiological samples on Signy Island. G. pannorum was only found during early winter on the year-round sampling sites. It was more abundant during summer in the air at the coastal site, which was more heavily influenced by seals, birds and humans. Skuas were swabbed when they returned to the island early in summer. G. pannorum was recovered in culture, suggesting that these birds may act as vectors for the transport of microorganisms between Antarctica and more northern landmasses. Organic material deposited on snow was concentrated on the soil at the edge of the ice cap by melt wash, making additional keratin and other organic substrates available to soil microorganisms.last_img read more

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Exploring former subglacial Hodgson Lake, Antarctica. Paper II: palaeolimnology

first_imgDirect exploration of subglacial lakes buried deep under the Antarctic Ice Sheet has yet to be achieved. However, at retreating margins of the ice sheet, there are a number of locations where former subglacial lakes are emerging from under the ice but remain perennially ice covered. One of these lakes, Hodgson Lake (72°00.549′S, 068°27.708′W) has emerged from under more than 297–465 m of glacial ice during the last few thousand years. This paper presents data from a multidisciplinary investigation of the palaeolimnology of this lake through a study of a 3.8 m sediment core extracted at a depth of 93.4 m below the ice surface. The core was dated using a combination of radiocarbon, optically stimulated luminescence, and relative palaeomagnetic intensity dating incorporated into a chronological model. Stratigraphic analyses included magnetic susceptibility, clast provenance, organic content, carbonate composition, siliceous microfossils, isotope and biogeochemical markers. Based on the chronological model we provisionally assign a well-defined magnetic polarity reversal event at ca 165 cm in the lake sediments to the Mono Lake excursion (ca 30–34 ka), whilst OSL measurements suggest that material incorporated into the basal sediments might date to 93 ± 9 ka. Four stratigraphic zones (A–D) were identified in the sedimentological data. The chronological model suggests that zones A–C were deposited between Marine Isotope Stages 5–2 and zone A during Stage 1, the Holocene. The palaeolimnological record tracks changes in the subglacial depositional environment linked principally to changing glacier dynamics and mass transport and indirectly to climate change. The sediment composition in zones A–C consists of fine-grained sediments together with sands, gravels and small clasts. There is no evidence of overriding glaciers being in contact with the bed reworking the stratigraphy or removing this sediment. This suggests that the lake existed in a subglacial cavity beneath overriding LGM ice. In zone D there is a transition to finer grained sediments characteristic of lower energy delivery coupled with a minor increase in the organic content attributed either to increases in allochthonous organic material being delivered from the deglaciating catchment, a minor increase in within-lake production or to an analytical artefact associated with an increase in the clay fraction. Evidence of biological activity is sparse. Total organic carbon varies from 0.2 to 0.6%, and cannot be unequivocally linked to in situ biological activity as comparisons of δ13C and C/N values with local reference data suggest that much of it is derived from the incorporation of carbon in catchment soils and gravels and possibly old CO2 in meteoric ice. We use the data from this study to provide guidelines for the study of deep continental subglacial lakes including establishing sediment geochronologies, determining the extent to which subglacial sediments might provide a record of glaciological and environmental change and a brief review of methods to use in the search for life.last_img read more

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