Conservative icon David Koch leaving business politics

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – Billionaire conservative icon David Koch is stepping down from the Koch brothers’ network of business and political activities.The 78-year-old New York resident is suffering from deteriorating health, according to a letter that older brother Charles Koch sent to company officials Tuesday morning.Charles Koch wrote that he is “deeply saddened” by his brother’s retirement. “David has always been a fighter and is dealing with this challenge in the same way,” he wrote.David Koch is leaving his roles as executive vice-president and board member for Koch Industries and a subsidiary, Koch Chemical Technology group, where he served as chairman and chief executive officer. Koch is also stepping down as chairman of the board for the Americans For Prosperity Foundation, the charity related to Koch brothers’ primary political organization.Charles Koch had assumed a more visible leadership role in the brothers’ affairs in recent years. He will continue to serve as the CEO of Koch Industries and the unofficial face of the network’s political efforts.Democrats have demonized the Koch brothers for their outsized influence in conservative politics over the last decade. Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid regularly attacked Republicans for what he called a “Koch addiction.”Yet the Kochs have clashed with the Trump administration at times.Citing concerns about Trump’s style and substance, the network refused to endorse either presidential candidate in the 2016 election. And while they have praised Trump’s policies on taxes, de-regulation and health care, they have aggressively attacked the Republican administration’s trade policies. On Monday, the Koch network announced a multi-million-dollar campaign to oppose Trump’s tariffs and highlight the benefit of free trade.Using the money they made from their Kansas-based family business empire, the Koch brothers have created what is likely the nation’s most powerful political organization with short- and long-term goals. Their network has promised to spend $400 million to shape the 2018 midterm elections. They have also devoted significant time and resources to strengthening conservative influence on college campuses, in the Hispanic community and in the non-profit sector.David Koch, who served as the Libertarian Party’s vice-presidential candidate in 1980, had begun focus more on philanthropy in recent years.The Manhattan resident donated $150 million to New York City’s Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in 2015, the largest gift in the organization’s history. He has also given $185 million in total donations to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his alma mater.In an April interview with the Washington Examiner, Charles Koch described his younger brother this way: “David is much more political than I am.”Charles continued: “David is a much better engineer than I am and is much more into the arts and social life. Obviously he’s got to be or he wouldn’t live in Manhattan. And David is much more into elective politics than I am.”In Tuesday’s letter, Charles Koch said his brother’s “guidance and loyalty, especially in our most troubled times, has been unwavering.”“David has never wanted anything for himself that he hasn’t earned, as his sole desire has always been to contribute,” he wrote.last_img read more

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Technology companies banks power US stocks solidly higher

Stocks rose broadly in early trading Tuesday on Wall Street, erasing the market’s modest losses from a day earlier.Technology companies powered the rally, with chipmakers among the biggest gainers. Nvidia rose 3.7 per cent and Advanced Micro Devices added 2.3 per cent.Banks also notched solid gains as bond prices headed lower, sending yields slightly higher. That helps banks charge higher interest rates on loans. Morgan Stanley rose 1.8 per cent.Health care and communications stocks also notched solid gains. Energy companies climbed as the price of U.S. crude oil moved above $60 a barrel. Oil hasn’t settled above that price since November.The rally marked a reversal for the market, which started the week on a downbeat note after racking up losses last week as investors’ jitters over a global economic slowdown intensified. That led to a troubling drop in long-term bond yields, which many see as a warning sign of a possible recession.The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.43 per cent in early trading Tuesday, up from 2.41 per cent late Monday. It’s still slightly below the yield on the three-month Treasury bill.Despite the market’s recent gyrations, the benchmark S&P 500 index is still up more than 12 per cent so far in 2019, an unusually strong start to a year, and on course for a solid first quarter for the market.KEEPING SCORE: The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 218 points, or 0.9 per cent, to 25,735 as of 10:12 a.m. Eastern Time. The S&P 500 index gained 0.9 per cent and the Nasdaq composite jumped 1.1 per cent. The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks picked up 0.9 per cent.Major European indexes were also headed higher, rebounding from a day earlier.BIG APPLE: Shares in Apple climbed 1.9 per cent a day after the consumer electronics giant announced a suite of new services to run on its devices.The company plans to launch a subscription TV service dubbed Apple TV Plus, which will be ad-free and will compete with big streaming services including Netflix and Amazon Video.BOARDROOM BRAWL: Bed Bath & Beyond soared 26.7 per cent in heavy trading after The Wall Street Journal reported that the troubled retailer is being targeted by three activist investors.ROUGH SEAS: Carnival slumped 7.3 per cent after the cruise line operator’s latest quarterly results fell short of Wall Street’s forecasts. The company also issued a weaker-than-expected second-quarter earnings outlook.ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude climbed 2.1 per cent to $60.06 a barrel. Oil has not closed above $60 a barrel since Nov. 9. Brent crude, used to price international oils, was up 1.3 per cent to $67.66 a barrel.Alex Veiga, The Associated Press read more

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Provincial Haitian hospital to have yearround clean water thanks to UN project

Every year the Sainte Thérèse hospital in Hinche has faced a shortage during the dry season while floods during the rainy season can contaminate drinking water supplies. But no longer. The UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) has funded a project to build a reservoir with wells to stock underground water and a series of gutters on the hospital’s roof to gather rainwater. The project is the third such QIP related to water that MINUSTAH has financed in Hinche. Overall 68 of the 300 QIPs in the country have been water-related, for a total amount of more than $620,000. QIPs are widely viewed as being among the most effective tools used by UN missions around the world to help local communities at ground level and at low cost, from repairing leaking roofs in schools in Georgia to opening a vocational centre in Liberia to refurbishing sanitation facilities in Burundi. In Haiti, MINUSTAH, set up in 2004 to help re-establish peace after an insurgency forced President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to go into exile, has focused on a wide range of such projects, from resurrecting a provincial library in the in Fort-Liberté, the main town in the north-east, to rehabilitating schools and laying out sports fields in formerly violence-ridden neighbourhoods it has helped rid of armed criminal gangs. 28 March 2007A provincial hospital in Haiti near the country’s border with the Dominican Republic will now enjoy a continual supply of clean water thanks to the United Nations peacekeeping mission, just one of the 300 so-called Quick Impact Projects (QIPs) it has financed in the past three years to improve life in the impoverished Caribbean country. read more

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UN evacuates critically ill Palestinian children from Iraq to Syria

“We are pleased to report that Syrian authorities on Wednesday allowed the first four into Syria,” UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) spokesman Ron Redmond told a news briefing in Geneva today. “The four are now in very critical condition and we greatly appreciate this decision by Syrian authorities.”The four patients, aged between 2 and 21, are suffering from severe diabetes, paralysis, Hodgkins disease and heart problems. They have been stranded in Al Waleed refugee camp on the Iraqi side of the border for months without proper medical attention. At least 16 other critically ill Palestinians still remain in Al Waleed camp and Baghdad, where access to specialized medical care is impossible. They include a 3-year-old suffering from a severe and painful skin rash, a 1-year-old with serious urinary problems and a 2-year-old suffering from cerebral palsy.“We continue our search for urgent solutions to get these children out, as most of them might die or be handicapped for life if they don’t get proper care soon,” Mr. Redmond said.Some 1,550 Palestinians who fled violence in Baghdad are stranded in camps on the Iraq-Syria border. Over the past year UNHCR has repeatedly called on the Iraqi authorities and the United States-led multinational forces to protect the Palestinians, who fled to Iraq after the creation of Israel in 1948.Some received preferential treatment under Saddam Hussein and have become targets for attack since his overthrow in 2003. Nearly 20,000 of them have already fled but an estimated 15,000 still remain in the country, mostly in Baghdad.Of the four evacuated on Wednesday, two will be allowed to remain in Syria, with some family members, while undergoing urgently needed medical care. The other two will travel on to third countries, where they will receive more specialized care. “We will be monitoring and funding the medical care, lodging and rehabilitation process,” Mr. Redmond said.Meanwhile, conditions in Al Waleed and nearby Al Tanf camps remain dire, according to UNHCR. In recent weeks, temperatures rose to nearly 50 degrees centigrade, making daily life nearly unbearable. The agency has procured some 90 small fridges, one per family tent, and tent coolers. “UNHCR continues to appeal for urgent solutions for the Palestinians at the border and in Baghdad, who are being targeted, killed, kidnapped and threatened,” Mr. Redmond said. “They have no possibility to leave Iraq as they are not accepted anywhere, unlike other persecuted Iraqis who can still flee to neighbouring countries and further afield. So far the response of the world has been minimal and we remain extremely concerned about their fate,” he added. 3 August 2007After weeks of appeals for the urgent medical evacuation from Iraq of seriously ill Palestinians, most of them children, the United Nations refugee agency was able this week to transport the first four patients into Syria to receive much-needed medical aid. read more

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SLJTU and Keheliya discuss code

The newly formed Sri Lanka Journalists Trade Union (SLJTU) has had discussions with Media Minister Keheliya Rambukwella on the proposed media code of ethics.President of the SLJTU Mandana Ismail Abeywickrema said that the right to information was also discussed at the meeting with the Minister. Addressing the media today, Abeywickrema said that it was agreed a broad discussion needs to take place on the topic before it is implemented. The General Secretary of the SLJTU, Priyantha Karunarathna, said that the intention of the trade union is not to confront the management of any media institution over any issue.Instead he said the SLJTU hopes to have broad discussions with them on issues that arise concerning the media in Sri Lanka or journalists attached to the respective newspaper or electronic media. (Colombo Gazette) She said that the SLJTU hopes to have a discussion with the local media on the proposed code in future as well. The SLJTU, which was launched today, consists of journalists from the print, electronic and online media in Sri Lanka.Abeywickrem said that the SLJTU hopes to address various concerns of the media and media workers through the trade union. read more

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Father and two sons killed in accident

All three were killed in the accident while two others sustained injuries. A father and two sons have been killed in an accident in Dehiattakandiya, the Police said.The Police said that the father and two sons, aged six and 14 were travelling on a motorcycle when it crashed into a tipper truck.

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Hearing horrific testimonies from rape survivors in South Sudan UN envoy says

Pramila Patten, UN Special Representative on Sexual Violence and Conflict, told reporterss that she had been “alarmed to hear about the increasing climate of intimidation” in which civil society organisations work, “including attacks against those providing services to sexual violence survivors.”The world’s youngest country, South Sudan has been wracked by violence and humanitarian crisis since late 2013, following a descent into faction fighting between forces loyal to the President and then Vice-President.As part of a joint UN–African Union visit, led by Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed from 3 to 7 July, Ms. Patten met government officials and religious leaders, among others.She toured sites protecting displaced civilians in Malakal and around the capital Juba, and spoke with survivors of sexual violence, who continue to live in acutely vulnerable situations.“The testimonies I heard were horrific: men being systematically killed, the elderly and sick being burned alive, the genitals of young boys being mutilated or cut off, and women and girls being gang-raped – often to death,” she continued.“In this context, sexual violence serves as a lethal tactic of war and a ‘push factor’ for forced displacement,” she added.Ms. Patten spoke to women in the protection camps who lamented the lack of food, health services and opportunities to make a living for themselves and their families. The main hope and desire of these women was “the desire for peace,” she stated.Although the women walk in groups collecting firewood to reduce attack risks, they need to venture beyond camp, still frequently assaulted by soldiers lurking in the high grass.“Yet,” she explained, “they have few alternatives, as they cannot ask male community members for help.”In the words of one woman: “Our men would get killed, whereas we only get raped.”“All of the women I spoke with said that they wanted to see the perpetrators punished,” said the Special Representative, “yet sexual violence is fueled and exacerbated by impunity on a massive scale.” UNMISSPramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, gives a press conference during her visit to South Sudan, 6 July 2018.Government officials affirmed their willingness to implement an agreed Joint UN Communiqué to end sexual violence and Cessation of Hostilities, she said, and to measure progress, an action plan had been drawn up to hold perpetrators of sexual violence within the army to account, she said.This month, she said she would deploy experts to South Sudan to provide technical assistance; and also brief the Security Council and South Sudan Sanctions Committee on her findings, including sexual violence among the criteria for sanctions.She underscored that a “permanent ceasefire” must be respected by all sides, and should also include the cessation of all forms of sexual violence.Ms. Patten said it was “critical” that the authorities investigate all alleged violations of international humanitarian and human rights law committed, as well as other alleged atrocity crimes.She commended the UN and AU efforts towards facilitating a lasting peace, recognizing the “extremely challenging” environment and called for increased donor support.A disturbing reportThe Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) released a report on Tuesday revealing indiscriminate attacks against civilians in Southern Unity State in which at least 120 women and girls, as young as four-years-old, were raped and gang-raped by the army and associated forces in Koch and Leer county. Witnesses indicate that those who resisted rape were shot.The report further documented 15 incidents of abduction involving at least 132 women and girls, for the purposes of sexual slavery and forced labor. read more

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Garrick Club considering vote on allowing women entry for first time in

While many high-profile members that time indicated they would vote for change, it is believed a number with more progressive views still voted to keep the club men-only. Along with other private member’s clubs White’s, Boodle’s and Pratt’s – The Garrick is one of only a few male-only spaces left in public life. One member told The Telegraph that while decisions were taken by secret ballot at The Garrick, the vote would never pass.”The difference with a secret ballot is that you can always blame somebody else,” he said. Another member dismissed the idea of the vote, saying he believed the issue of The Garrick’s membership gained undue public attention because of its high-profile membership.”When people join the club, they know what they’re getting,” the member said. “A men’s club for men. Just like women who join a women’s club can expect a club for women.”Yet The Mail on Sunday claimed other members had reported that the prevailing mood may have changed enough since 2015 to see the vote passed. “The role of women in the theatre should be recognised. I think there has been a huge swing. There is a great feeling that this is something we need to look at,” a source told the paper. The Garrick Club is understood to be considering a vote on whether to allow women entry for the first time in its 187-year history. As one of the last remaining members clubs in Britain maintaining a male-only policy, it has faced calls to diversify. Members at meetings behind closed doors are said to have discussed the possibility of a ballot to decide whether or not to allow women into the club. However, insiders have questioned whether the vote would have any chance of reaching the two-thirds majority necessary to pass. They say the make-up of the club has not changed enough since a vote in 2015 that saw only 50.5 per cent of members vote in favour of admitting women. Now it is believed a meeting has been held by the club’s committee to discuss whether to hold another vote in the new year. The Garrick, which was founded in 1831 and named after the leading 18th-century actor David Garrick, has always had strong connections with the theatre world.It counts Stephen Fry, Damian Lewis, Hugh Bonneville and Michael Gove among its members. BBC journalist John Simpson said of the vote the last time around: “Nobody in The Garrick feels this is the end of the road”.  “At the last meeting those members who were anti women members were vitriolic, vicious and unbeleivably rude and really unpleasant.”Whether the vote will go ahead is a matter of question. It is believed a five-year moratorium may have been put into place on the matter following the last vote.The issue has cropped up time and again among the club membership since as far back as the 1970s. While women are allowed to visit the club on Garrick Street as members, many of the rooms remain male-only. One female visitor said it was only in the last five years that she has felt comfortable using the main staircase. Traditionally women were only allowed to use the back staircase.The Garrick could not be reached yesterday for comment. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Environ opens first African office to meet industry demand

first_imgEnviron is expanding its global network by opening its first office in Africa on March 1, 2012 in Johannesburg. The group said that it is establishing operations in Johannesburg in response to increasing demand for the firm’s environmental and health sciences consulting work in South Africa and throughout the wider African region. Recent projects have included large due diligence asset portfolios, contaminated land projects and compliance management projects in the oil and gas, mining, steel, commodity and technology sectors.It will offer a full range of environmental and health sciences consulting services, including environmental due diligence, contaminated land management, environmental health and safety (EHS) compliance, environmental and social impact assessment (ESIA), toxicological and epidemiological support and risk assessment to businesses across Africa – from local companies to multinational organisations. David Scott, Managing Principal of Environ Africa, and Senior Manager Clinton Phaal will lead consultancy work and business development in South Africa. Both are South African citizens with extensive environmental consulting experience in the region.last_img read more

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Roamin Catholics How to get a ticket to see the Pope in

first_img 39,780 Views 60 Comments Tuesday 12 Jun 2018, 6:01 AM MORE THAN 500,000 tickets will be made available for Pope Francis’ Mass at the Phoenix Park and at Knock this August but tickets will not be released until closer to the event.Organisers say that tickets will not be available on general release until they have completed consultations with ”the relevant statutory agencies on capacity, transport, security, safety and other issues”.When tickets do become available, they will be free of charge. However, those who are really keen to ensure they will be there on the day have options. They can book a three-day or a one-day registration to the World Meeting of Families 2018 (WMOF) which allows them to book a free ticket to the Final Mass at the same time.A single-day ticket starts from €33, while a five-day ticket costs €68. Both are on sale now.The government set up its official website for the visit and urged anyone interested in attending the two main public events at the Phoenix Park or at Knock to make sure they had tickets before planning their journeys.When tickets become available, you can register for them here.After registration, tickets will be sent by email in the form of a ‘print at home’ ticket or via post. This will include travel information, along with details of how to get to your section at the event.The Pope will spend two full days in the country on 25 and 26 August as part of the WMOF, with his full itinerary announced yesterday.Security The Government is set to spend almost €3 million on security personnel and equipment for Pope Francis’s visit to Ireland.It was also revealed that specialist garda operations targeting gangs and violent criminals in some parts of Dublin have had overtime allocations stopped in a bid to save money for the papal visit.Hundreds of uniformed members will be deployed around the Phoenix Park – many to assist public order units, with others helping stewards to keep the event safe and to avoid any crushes or bottlenecks.However, there will also be a large number of specialist units around the park on the day. These will include armed gardaí, bomb sniffer dogs as well as snipers.The Vatican will also bring its own security team.The government has urged people who intend to attend the Mass to start preparing for their journey now.At a minimum, attendees will be required to walk 4km to and from the Mass. Source: gov.ieThe image above shows what a journey on the day will involve and the time it might take you to get in and out of the Phoenix Park.The website will be updated regularly as the date draws closer. Roamin’ Catholics: How to get a ticket to see the Pope in Dublin or Knock If you think you can just show up to the Pope’s Mass, think again. Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article http://jrnl.ie/4064492 Image: Jack Kurtz By Adam Daly Image: Jack Kurtz Jun 12th 2018, 6:02 AM Short URL Share28 Tweet Email1 last_img read more

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Vakos philanthropic side

first_imgA donation by chef Philip Vakos, of Spitiko restaurant, for a dining experience at his establishment, was auctioned for $2000 last week at A Celebration of Life Gala Ball, held last Thursday at Crown Casino to raise money for Victoria’s most vulnerable babies. The money raised was donated to the Newborn Intensive Care Unit at The Royal Children’s Hospital. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img

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Hughton Decisions favored Liverpool

first_imgBrighton manager Chris Hughton felt that the bulk of decisions went Liverpool’s way in their 1-0 home defeat to the league leaders.Mo Salah converted from the spot to give Liverpool a crucial 1-0 win at Brighton after the Egyptian was judged to have been fouled by Pascal Gross.Hughton, however, had no complaints about the penalty but believes that plenty other decisions favored them.“There’s no intent and referees have a hard job, but sometimes you feel things go your way and sometimes you feel some of the decisions don’t go your way,” Hughton told Sky Sports.“I felt today it was one of those days. No malice or anything towards the referee but I thought the bulk of decisions favored Liverpool today.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“On the balance of play, I thought we deserved something.“They are such a good side and the opportunities they had were when we were trying to get back into the game and put bodies forward and made the game a bit more open. I thought we restricted them to minimal chances.“Pascal Gross’ chance [a shot in the second half] was probably as good as any of their chances.“We were always in the game and discipline was really good from the team, which it has to be because they can open you up.“In the latter part of the game we went for it a bit and showed a real intent to get back on level terms and I thought for the feel of the game that we deserved something.”last_img read more

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VIDEO Aerial Footage Of Silver Lake Over Different Seasons

first_img—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Silver Lake Impacted By DroughtIn “Videos”VIDEO: See 10 Familiar Wilmington Locations From Above Via DroneIn “Videos”WCTV To Host Drone Photography Meet-Up On July 21In “Community” WILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington native Jamie Boudreau, owner of Airgoz Aerial Photography, recently posted a compilation of drone footage of Silver Lake he has taken over the past several years.  Check it out below:—last_img read more

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As Kenai Peninsula dries out likelihood for fires increases

first_imgNow some places were you used to need rubber boots in the wetlands, you can get by with just tennis shoes. That might be a nice change for hiking. But not so for stopping fires, which wetlands usually do. Ed Berg is digging a roughly foot-wide-hole in a wetland off Diamond Creek Trail in Homer. He’s a retired ecologist from the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. So here on the peninsula, which is used to seeing summer forest fires, spring grassland fires are likely to become more common.  The Kenai Peninsula is drying out and this summer, fires have sprouted up in some unusual places. Scientists warn about this trend: meaning bigger fires and more of them. These roots are an indication of a profound change. For thousands of years, peninsula wetlands didn’t see any woody shrubs like these.  “The fire just would burn up to the edge and wouldn’t normally burn across it,” Berg said. “Now these firebreaks are being turned into what you might call fire bridges.” He said these plants are sprouting up because of warmer temperatures and less precipitation. And as a whole, wetlands across the peninsula are just less wet.  “Well, what’s changing now with the climates we’re getting is that spring window is getting a little bit longer, where are you have this exposure of dried grass on top of the ground there, so that’s getting longer,” said Kenai National Wildlife Refuge Supervisory Biologist John Morton. “Within the last 50 years or so, the woody plants have come in gangbusters and starting even earlier with some of the trees like black spruce, which are very moisture tolerant, especially since the 1970s, we’ve seen these shrubs come in,” Berg said. But wetlands aren’t the only landscapes changing. Essentially all the water stored in the soil has declined by roughly 60 percent on the Kenai Peninsula. Drying out not just wetlands, but grasslands too. “We tend to be really good at putting out those fires that we start partly because we tend to start them in populated areas, and we have resources available to very quickly jump on those” Rupp said. “Where as lightning is occurring all over the landscape and many times in very remote areas.” “This year, of course, we had two fires up in Caribou Hills that started in grassland and what was so unusual about them is that these are the first fires that I’m aware of where they were actually caused by lightning in early June in a grassland situation on the Kenai,” Berg said. Back at Diamond Creek Trail, Ed Berg said fire safety is something he wants residents here to think about. Even if they live by a wetland.  “So what I’m seeing in the plug are all these little woody roots that are from the crowberry and the dwarf birch drawers, and blueberry,” Berg said. Scott Rupp is the deputy director of the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He said the number of lightning strikes happening in Alaska is unprecedented. Most strikes aren’t starting fires. But the ones that do are often hard to put out.  That brings us to another big shift: warmer weather is bringing early summer and late spring storms… with lightning. And lightning plus dry grass is a perfect recipe for fires.  A wetland near Diamond Creek Trail in Homer. (Photo by Renee Gross, KBBI – Homer) He said residents should be prepared for the change. “They may think they’re protected if they have muskeg growing on all sides of their house” Berg said. “But in the next 20 years, that muskeg may turn into a spruce woodland and they won’t be as protected.”last_img read more

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VIDEO Brain Arterial Venous Malformation Imaged on Angiography

first_img Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Find more SCCT news and videos This is an example of an arterial venous malformation (AVM) in the brain imaged on a Canon Alphenix Alpha angiography system. It shjows a contrast injection highlighting the vessels, which have been color coded to show the position of the veins and arteries involved in this vascular defect. Read more about advances in angiography imaging systems.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Sponsored Videos View all 142 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Find more SCCT news and videos Conference Coverage View all 396 items Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM.center_img Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Women’s Health View all 62 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Videos | Angiography | February 08, 2019 VIDEO: Brain Arterial Venous Malformation Imaged on Angiography Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. 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Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Information Technology View all 220 items Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

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Derrick Hall satisfied with Dbacks buying and se

first_img Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Butler’s 41.3 gross average and 35.4 net average rank dead last among NFL punters.“You’re in some critical situations, and it’s not like you have a backup punter you can put in if a guy is having a rough day,” Keim said. “We’ll certainly talk about that today and see where it goes moving forward.” – / 25 Top Stories Most notably, Butler’s final punt of the day, which came with 7:26 left in the second quarter, fell short of where it needed to be. Leading 7-3, the Cardinals faced a 4th-and-15 at their own 20-yard line. Butler’s punt traveled 28 yards, out of bounds, allowing Washington to start a possession in Arizona territory at the 48-yard line. Eleven plays later, Washington got a field goal from Dustin Hopkins to pull to within a point at 7-6Steve Keim, the team’s general manager, isn’t exactly happy with what he’s seen.“Not satisfied at all,” Keim told Doug and Wolf Monday morning on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM. “Like any other position, there are expectations, and at that spot right now, we’re not living up to expectations.“It’s a results-based business, and if you’re not getting the job done, we’ll look and see if there’s someone who can.”Butler won the punting job in training camp, but struggled early in the season with ineffectiveness and injuries. He was actually waived in early October with an injury settlement and replaced by veteran Ryan Quigley. The punting game didn’t get much better with Quigley handling the job, and Butler was brought back in mid-November. Arizona Cardinals punter Drew Butler. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri) The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo The Arizona Cardinals got a much-needed win Sunday when they downed the Washington Redskins 31-23 at University of Phoenix Stadium.While getting back in the win column can do wonders for a lot of what has been ailing an underachieving team, it’s not a cure-all.One issue that has plagued the Cardinals all season was still present in their most recent triumph: punting.Drew Butler averaged just 39.7 yards on three punts Sunday, mostly failing to affect field position when the Cardinals saw drives stall.center_img Your browser does not support the audio element. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact LISTEN: Steve Keim, Cardinals general manager Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Comments   Share   last_img read more

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Rep Cole reflects on invaluable role agriculture plays in Michigans economy

first_img Categories: Cole News,Featured news,News 14Mar Rep. Cole reflects on invaluable role agriculture plays in Michigan’s economy Tags: #SB, Ag Week, Agriculture, Cole, HD105 center_img Column by State Rep. Triston Cole, R-Mancelona March 13 – 19 denotes Agriculture Week here in Michigan and as vice chair of the House Agriculture Committee and a farmer myself, I feel compelled to tout the indispensable role that farming has played in boosting Michigan’s economy.I vividly remember six years ago coming down from Antrim County to the Capitol during “Ag Week” to deliver gift baskets made up of Michigan products to lawmakers’ offices with Michigan Farm Bureau volunteers. At that time, former Gov. Granholm had just issued a “Meatout” Proclamation on March 20, 2010. In doing so, the former governor turned her back on a large portion of Michigan’s animal agricultural producers by urging residents to choose not to eat meat as part of a healthy diet.I was shocked, my colleagues were shocked, and it was a slap in the face to all Michigan farmers. Agriculture is the second largest industry in Michigan. To insinuate eating meat is not healthy is a laughable offense. The insult and disregard towards our Michigan farmers was a far graver mistake. She could have easily chosen to highlight healthy choices and portion size without going negative.Fast forward to 2016, Michigan Republicans have embraced the farming community and helped clear the way for expansion across the agriculture industry, opening the door to endless opportunities for farmers to thrive and prosper. Michigan’s food and agriculture system now supports more than 920,000 jobs, which is roughly 22 percent of the entire state’s workforce.Michigan’s food and agriculture industry is second in diversity behind California, ranking first nationally in production of 11 different commodities, including blueberries, tart cherries, pickling cucumbers and squash. Agriculture in Michigan contributes in excess of $101.2 billion annually to the state’s economy. Our individual farms of varying sizes number over 51,000, of which 95 percent are family-owned. These farms, most of which are also multigenerational, cultivate, care for, keep and protect nearly 10 million acres of land in production and commercially produce more than 300 food and agricultural commodities. Additionally, we are a major dairy state along with ranking in the top 10 nationally for the production of apples, sugar beets, potatoes and grapes.Buying local agricultural commodities continues to fuel the reinvention of Michigan. Whether it be buying begonias or geraniums for your flower beds, purchasing fresh produce at the local farmers market or even a beer at your favorite brewery (we have over 200 micro-breweries) these homegrown entities are at the heart of the agriculture industry here in Michigan.Spring is coming quickly, with the warmer temperatures, snow cover and frozen ground receding, a surge of activity in the fields is imminent. You will begin to see more, often over-sized, agricultural equipment moving about on the roadways. One particular item I would like to highlight is the Slow Moving Vehicle Placard or SMV Triangle. The proper use of the placard is for it to be mounted on the back of farm vehicles, wagons and implements, as well as animal-drawn wagons and buggies, to warn other car and truck drivers of slow speeds. There continues to be a problem of misuse across Michigan with SMV triangles being placed on fixed objects, such as at the end of driveways, or on mailboxes. This becomes a major safety concern as drivers become accustomed to seeing the triangle symbol on fixed objects instead of actual slow-moving vehicles. Motorists may attempt to maneuver around what they believe is to be a fixed object when they see the triangle symbol in the distance and create a safety hazard for the actual SMV and themselves.Another highlight for agriculture is the Michigan AgrAbility program. This program is a great resource for farmers with medical impairments. The partnership between Michigan Easter Seals and Michigan State University Extension is also strongly supported by Michigan Farm Bureau and other organizations.  AgrAbility sends an agricultural engineer directly to a farm needing assistance to help devise new tools and methods to allow a farmer to keep working in spite of an injury or illness.  Several farmers from the 105th House District have been aided by AgrAbility along with many more across the state including numerous veterans.The program has helped Wayne in Mio, who suffers from severe arthritis, was provided with a small tractor and sheep handling equipment so that he could move around his farm, mechanically handle materials and corral his livestock. AgrAbility assisted Lois in Gaylord in redesigning her barn and installing a hand clutch on her tractor so she could milk her goats and continue working her farm after she endured a medically necessary leg amputation.  Another farmer lost part of his hand, and AgrAbility covered the cost to bury water lines and connect water to multiple livestock barns so he would not need to carry 5-gallon pails of water during freezing winter months. For more information about AgrAbility, call 800-956-4106 or visit www.MichiganAgrAbility.org .This next week and all year round, I encourage you to support your local farmers and respect their hard work to provide you with Michigan-grown products. The agricultural contributions we make will only continue to grow, creating more jobs and more healthy eating options for our families across this great state!######last_img read more

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Rep Howrylak announces new location for December office hours

first_img Categories: Howrylak News 13Dec Rep. Howrylak announces new location for December office hours State Rep. Martin Howrylak of Troy invites residents to join him for a local office hour during the month of December.“I always value the opportunity to meet with friends and neighbors to discuss the policy issues that are important to our state,” Rep. Howrylak said. “Residents who are interested in discussing legislative matters or have questions related to state government are encouraged to stop by at their leisure.”Office hours will take place at the following time and location:• Saturday, Dec. 16 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the Troy Community Center, Room 402, 3179 Livernois Road in Troy.No appointment is necessary. Those unable to attend may contact Rep. Howrylak at 517-373-1783 or via email at MartinHowrylak@house.mi.gov.last_img read more

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Panel approves Frederick plan to expand college options to high school students

first_img Categories: Frederick News,News Michigan high school students will be better informed of college level courses and testing options under a legislative plan approved today by the House Workforce and Talent Development Committee.State Rep. Ben Frederick, who took 10 examinations as an adult in pursuing his bachelors degree, wants students to receive more information on the registration, eligibility, and fees for college level equivalent credit examinations and courses.“This is another educational option for high school students to begin earning college credits, even before getting their diploma,” said Frederick, chair of the committee. “Advanced testing, such as the College Level Examination Program, helped me save both money and time in the classroom. We should tell all high school students about it as an opportunity to get a jump start on college and a career.”Ty Krauss, a member of the Owosso Public Schools board of education and a business services manager with Michigan Works, joined Frederick in testifying before the committee on May 15. He described the bill as a way to start a student’s college education quickly, also allowing students to pursue advanced courses immediately after arriving on campus.Frederick noted 52 percent of Michigan’s public university students in 2016 needed more than four years to complete the degree, helping to contribute to nearly 1.5 trillion in student debt nationwide.“The student debt crisis is a tragedy affecting families across our state,” said Frederick, of Owosso. “If we can help students get into their major coursework faster and complete their degree in four years or even less, it’s better for the student’s career and their wallet.”The Shiawassee Regional Education Service District also indicated its support during committee testimony.House Bill 5907, which received unanimous support in the committee, advances to the House for consideration. 22May Panel approves Frederick plan to expand college options to high school studentslast_img read more

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Police Training Center in Chicago Links Concerns about Policing and Urban Development

first_imgShare8Tweet5ShareEmail13 SharesFrom WarResisters.org.November 8, 2017; Chicago TribuneIn Chicago, as in other large, rapidly changing metropolitan areas, community development projects are often contested and hotly debated. A new campaign led by local activists against a $95 million police training center proposed for the West Garfield Park area has raised new questions about urban revitalization strategies that could impact how nonprofits and foundations align with Black and Brown communities that are organizing to end racial violence.In a packed city council hearing, community activists and Chance the Rapper delivered a powerful message to Mayor Rahm Emanuel and city aldermen that the training center was not welcome in Chicago. One after another, Chicago leaders vocalized the realities of police violence, recalled the hundreds of millions of dollars of public resources spent on police misconduct cases, and lambasted city council members for closing 50 public schools in their neighborhoods. A series of speeches by youth leaders and longtime residents even circulated as videos on social media.The large turnout of over 40 organizations reflected the organizing skill and strong support building across the city for the new youth-led No Cop Academy campaign. Repeated calls to fund public schools, youth employment programs, and mental health facilities instead of a 30-acre police center highlighted the anger many feel about the lack of resources in Black and Brown communities amid a disturbing trend in the allocation of funds for urban revitalization in Chicago.Indeed, apart from learning that hundreds of cases of police misconduct have cost taxpayers over 370 million dollars since 2011, over the past few months Chicagoans have also learned about plans for large-scale development projects surrounding the central business district, totaling an estimated $20 billion. According to an article published by the Chicago Tribune on June 23, 2017,In Chicago, at least 10 developments that will cost $1 billion or more are already under construction or are backed by high-powered developers that are in advanced planning stages…Among this era’s largest projects are multibillion-dollar ones such as Related Midwest’s $5 billion-plus vision for a 62-acre site along the Chicago River in the South Loop and Sterling Bay’s yet-to-be-unveiled blueprints for more than 40 acres on and around the North Side site where the A. Finkl & Sons steel plant once stood along the river. At least six other projects of $500 million or more are underway or near the starting line, including the Chicago Cubs owners’ redevelopment of Wrigley Field and surrounding properties, a conversion of the long-vacant old main post office into modern offices and retail, and Blackstone Group’s planned retail and entertainment addition onto the base of the city’s tallest building, Willis Tower…Regardless of how they all fare, the sheer number of proposed megaprojects stands out, making this a unique time in Chicago.While private developers have gotten the green light under the Emanuel administration, the mayor has also worked aggressively to attract corporate headquarters to Chicago. Last month, for example, Chicago and the state of Illinois submitted a joint proposal to Amazon that involved ten sites and an estimated $2 billion in tax incentives. According to one report,Described by many as the biggest tech prize in recent memory, the deal is said to be worth up to $5 billion in investment and 50,000 jobs. In addition to these ten Amazon-friendly locations, the bid is also said to include an incentive package from local, county, and state governments.One could list a number of other controversial projects that rely upon vast public resources and have brought few benefits to low income and Black and Brown communities. Even more troubling is that high profile community revitalization programs intended to benefit historically neglected communities are reportedly failing.An October DNAinfo article reported that a $100 million Catalyst Fund led by city Treasurer Kurt Summers has yet to become operational. According to the report,A year ago, aldermen and Mayor Rahm Emanuel heralded the creation of a $100 million investment fund with taxpayer money, assuring critics that it would breathe new life into the South and West sides of Chicago and help fight crime and blight. But the fund has yet to invest a single dollar.A three-year and $40 million grant program was announced in September 2017 by JPMorgan Chase, but it’s too early to evaluate the success of the program.In other words, reports indicate that many Black and Brown communities have experienced broken promises of revitalization and will see miniscule resources in comparison to land and tax investments in private development projects and corporate relocations. That Chicago’s city council is seriously considering approving a $95 million police training center that many community members oppose further exacerbates this already alarming inequality in urban revitalization. Notably, while proponents of the police center frame the project as a reinvestment initiative that will bring jobs and resources to West Garfield Park, the No Cop Academy Campaign is educating the public about the multiple ways that $95 million could be spent to serve the community and not contribute to carceral practices.For nonprofit organizations and foundations committed to racial justice and equitable community development, the No Cop Academy campaign in Chicago should raise serious questions about the economics, politics, and ethics of police-oriented development projects. More importantly, if elected officials are committed to accomplishing urban revitalization through law enforcement agencies against the will of Black and Brown communities, nonprofit and philanthropic leaders will have to decide with which vision of the revitalized city they are aligned.—Antonio LopezShare8Tweet5ShareEmail13 Shareslast_img read more

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