Trump doesn’t have democratic values

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion His mother was an Scottish immigrant. Donald Trump grew up in a home with no basis for absorbing democratic ideals. As a result, he reflects that lack in his attitudes and behavior. He’s the only president who didn’t grow up immersed in democratic principles.This helps explain his affinity for despots and dictators. They exhibit tendencies and traits he learned at home. He didn’t grow from the inside out as a product of a democratic environment. He will not, cannot, change. He will continue to attack our institutions and ideals because at his core, they are offensive to the way he was raised.From the inside out, I was raised to love democratic principles. I fear those in power who don’t share those values.Frank ElflandCharlton More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Don’t repeal bail reform law; Fix it the right wayEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Make a game plan for voting. Do it now.Saratoga Springs bank sues operators of Golden Corral restaurants over Paycheck Protection loansSaratoga Sheriff: Providence man ID’d as motorcyclist killed in crash with deer Democracy is a concept that requires immersion. As you grow up in a democratic society, the nuances of how and why it works are integrated into who you are as a person.That’s why freeing a nation of a despot doesn’t automatically mean its people will embrace democratic principles. You can’t paint the understanding of democratic principles on those who have no basis for accepting them.I have tried to come to grips with why Donald Trump has so little understanding or appreciation for how the American form of governance works.Democracy wasn’t a family value for the Trumps. Donald’s father, Fred, grew up in America in a German-speaking household. His grandparents were products of 18th century Germany — no bastion of democracy.last_img read more

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Manchester regeneration: Sporting chance

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‘It’s who you know that counts here’

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Who’s in, who’s out in Democratic White House race

first_imgAnd then there were five.The Democratic Party set records last year for the size and diversity of its field of candidates seeking to challenge President Donald Trump.Fast-forward to Super Tuesday, when 14 states vote in what could be the most consequential day of the nomination race, and the party has just five hopefuls left in the fight. Three have called it quits since Saturday, while the top three remaining are all septuagenarian white men.So where do the five candidates stand as the party struggles to find a leader who can unite its competing factions and defeat Trump in November?Democratic White House hopeful Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders arrives to speak during a campaign rally at the Convention Center in Los Angeles, California on March 1, 2020. – Left-leaning California has thrust itself back into the heart of the fight for the presidency in 2020, casting a potentially decisive vote March 3 in the Democratic nominee to face Donald Trump. (AFP/Mark RALSTON )Bernie Sanders  Topics :center_img Sanders, 78, had been the clear winner of the nomination battle until recently, emerging as the frontrunner after early votes in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada.But on Saturday he finished a distant second in South Carolina’s primary behind Joe Biden, raising the prospect of a comeback by the former vice president.The success of Sanders, a leftist senator from Vermont, has generated alarm among party moderates who fear his policies are too radical and make him an easy target for Trump.”They’re getting nervous,” Sanders told rally attendees Sunday in California.Sanders still has momentum heading into Super Tuesday, given his polling lead in California and the next largest state, Texas.Trump has signaled he would prefer to go head to head with Sanders — who he has dubbed a “communist” — and has repeatedly mocked Democrats for scrambling to coalesce around a moderate alternative.”It’s rigged against Bernie, there is no question about it,” Trump said Monday.Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks to supporters at a campaign event on March 2, 2020 in Houston, Texas. Candidates are campaigning the day before Super Tuesday, when 1,357 Democratic delegates in 14 states across the country will be up for grabs. (AFP/Callaghan O’Hare/Getty Images)Joe Biden Barack Obama’s vice president is proud of the loyalty he has earned among many black voters, and they came through for him in a big way in South Carolina.Concern had grown that Biden’s performances in debates and poor results in early states put him at a major disadvantage to Sanders.By trouncing Sanders in the southern state, he revived his sagging campaign and knocked three rivals out of the race, including fellow moderates Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar.Biden, 77, now credibly claims he is the Democratic centrist who can do battle against Sanders and bring American voters from various socio-economic backgrounds and disparate political ideologies together.”The country is hungry, hungry to be united,” he said Monday in Houston.Democratic presidential candidate former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks during the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) policy conference, on March 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. AIPAC is the lobbying group that advocates pro-Israel policies in the U.S. (AFP/ Mark Wilson/Getty Images)Michael Bloomberg Bloomberg, a billionaire US media tycoon, sat out the first four early nomination contests and makes his Democratic ballot debut in the 14 states that head to the polls on Super Tuesday.The former New York mayor, age 78, is focusing on California, with the single biggest delegate haul, and other prize states like Virginia.But the late-starter is a major contender in the overall race, boosted by his vast, self-financed campaign budget — he has poured a staggering $500 million into advertising, a record.Bloomberg says he offers the best chance of defeating Trump.SELMA, ALABAMA – MARCH 01: (L-R) Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), participate in the Edmund Pettus Bridge crossing reenactment marking the 55th anniversary of Selma’s Bloody Sunday on March 1, 2020 in Selma, Alabama. Some of the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates attended the Selma bridge crossing jubilee ahead of Super Tuesday. (AFP/Joe Raedle/Getty Images)Elizabeth Warren After disappointing results in the first three contests, the 70-year-old senator from Massachusetts tried to regain ground with effective attacks on Bloomberg in the past two debates.But she failed to move the needle in South Carolina, finishing back in fifth spot.As a progressive, Warren has suffered from Sanders’ rise, and her prospects look to be fading.But she has remained committed to the campaign, and is advertising or has booked air time in at least 11 states that vote after Super Tuesday, including Florida, Michigan and Ohio, according to tracker Advertising Analytics.Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) answers media questions following a campaign event on February 9, 2020 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The first in the nation primary is on Tuesday, February 11. (AFP/Scott Eisen)Tulsi Gabbard The congresswoman from Hawaii has never been a strong contender for the nomination, but she has outlasted several better funded rivals.Gabbard, 38, holds isolationist foreign policy views and is demanding US military withdrawal from Iraq as well as Syria.In January she filed a lawsuit against the 2016 Democratic nominee, Hillary Clinton, for calling her a “Russian asset.”last_img read more

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Bandung hospital flooded with requests for ‘COVID-19-free certificate’

first_imgHasan Sadikin Hospital in Bandung, the largest hospital in West Java province, has been flooded by people asking its staff to issue them a “COVID-19-free certificate”, despite the fact that the document does not exist.“There is no such thing. It is not permitted,” the hospital’s president director, Nina Susana Dewi, said on Wednesday.Nina said that the majority of people requesting the nonexistent document had come in for a checkup after returning from abroad, especially those who had traveled to countries with confirmed COVID-19 cases. “There are also people who request such a certificate because they want to go abroad,” said Nina.Read also: West Java Health Agency faces troubles in tracing COVID-19 spreadAccording to the World Health Organization (WHO), 114 countries and territories across the globe had confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection by Wednesday.Nina said that the hospital continued to provide checkups at its general consultation unit or infectious diseases unit. If the checkup showed that the individual was in good condition, the hospital would issue a general medical certificate of good health, but could not specifically mention COVID-19.People who had returned from affected countries were also welcome at the hospital, she added. Even if they were found to be healthy, the hospital would still place them on its monitoring list as a precaution.People who showed flu-like symptoms – including but not limited to fever, coughing and sore throat – would be advised to self-isolate at home and contact the West Java COVID-19 information and coordination center’s 119 hotline to report their daily condition.Nina said the hospital maintained a record of people with a travel history to affected countries as part of its protocol, and that it advised them to return “for another checkup 14 days after their arrival in Indonesia”. (gis)Topics :last_img read more

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Canada PM’s wife positive for new coronavirus

first_imgJustin Trudeau’s wife has tested positive for novel coronavirus, his office said late Thursday, while assuring the public the Canadian prime minister is fine.Canada’s leader and his 44-year-old wife announced Thursday they were self-isolating while she was tested for coronavirus after a public event.”Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau was tested for COVID-19 today. The test came back positive,” the Prime Minister’s office said in a statement, adding she would remain in isolation and her symptoms were mild. “The Prime Minister is in good health with no symptoms,” the statement said, noting he would also be in isolation for two weeks and — on the advice of his doctors — will not be tested for the virus.It follows several provinces in Canada — which so far has reported nearly 150 cases in six states, and one death — unveiling stricter measures to combat the spread of the virus while sporting events and entertainment galas were canceled.The PM would continue his duties, his office said, and would address the country on Saturday.Trudeau, 48, held several meetings over the phone on Thursday, including with the special cabinet committee on COVID-19, his office said, and also spoke with the leaders of Italy, the US and Britain. On Friday he will talk with indigenous leaders, as well as provincial and territorial premiers to coordinate Canada’s response to the virus, and “limit the economic impact on the country.”After experiencing some mild symptoms following her return from the UK, according to an earlier statement, Gregoire-Trudeau immediately sought medical advice and testing.”Although I’m experiencing uncomfortable symptoms of the virus, I will be back on my feet soon,” she said in a message via the PM’s Office.”Being in quarantine at home is nothing compared to other Canadian families who might be going through this and for those facing more serious health concerns.”Since the novel coronavirus first emerged in late December 2019, more than 130,000 cases have been recorded in 116 countries and territories, killing at least 4,900 people, according to an AFP tally.Most of Canada’s cases have been traced to China, Iran, Italy or Egypt, but seven people who recently returned from the US also tested positive, public health authorities said. Avoid churches: health minister In parliament, Health Minister Patty Hajdu urged Canadians to “reconsider going to areas where there are a large number of people, which might include places like churches, community centres, concerts and various sporting events.”Quebec’s Premier Francois Legault unveiled the strongest emergency measures yet in Canada, asking all travelers returning from overseas trips or anyone exhibiting flu-like symptoms to self-isolate for two weeks. A ban on indoor gatherings of more than 250 people was also announced, with Montreal’s Saint Patrick’s Day parade — held since 1824 — postponed.Alberta and British Columbia announced bans on large gatherings too.Quebec, which has 13 confirmed cases of the virus, is also considering placing the entire island of Montreal — a population of nearly 2 million — under quarantine.In neighboring Ontario, public health officials announced the public schools would be shut until April 5.The Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television canceled this year’s Canadian Screen Awards — scheduled to air on March 29 — and the country’s Juno music awards, planned for Sunday, were also scrapped.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Paralysis for Latin America with Argentine lockdown, Rio beach closures

first_imgBrazil on Thursday announced it was closing land borders and prohibiting entry to people from European and many Pacific Asian countries to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, as Mexico and Peru reported their first virus deaths.And Argentina said it would go on a “preventative and compulsory” lockdown from Friday until March 31 in an effort to contain the virus.Brazil’s Rio de Janeiro state also said it would bar people from its world famous beaches including Copacabana and Ipanema. They apply to people coming from the European Union, Britain, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland, as well as China, Japan, South Korea, Australia and Malaysia who are not Brazilian residents or do not have valid work or family reasons to travel.Latin America’s largest country, with a population of 210 million, has so far registered 621 cases of the coronavirus, with six deaths.Rio state governor Wilson Witzel said from Saturday he would close all beaches, bars and restaurants. He also announced a measure to cut transport links with other Brazilian states with reported virus cases, although that needs to be ratified by federal authorities.Mexico reported its first coronavirus death — a 41-year-old man with diabetes who died on Wednesday in Mexico City. Mexico has recorded 118 virus cases.A Mexican federal judge meanwhile ordered President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador to take all preventative measures and necessary actions in order to detect infected persons in the country.Peru, which has a total of 234 confirmed cases, reported its first three deaths.  Chile stimulus planChile’s stimulus plan “will strengthen our ability to face the health, economic and social needs that the coronavirus pandemic is signifying and that will probably tend to worsen in the future,” President Sebastian Pinera told a press conference.Senate speaker Adriana Munoz said the leaders of the main political parties had agreed to postpone the referendum on changing the dictatorship-era constitution from April 26 to October 25, to give the country time to deal with the virus.Health Minister Jaime Manalich announced a lockdown of Chile’s Easter Island, saying no one could enter or leave the remote Pacific island for the next two weeks.Police meanwhile said they had foiled an attempted break-out from Chile’s largest jail. Earlier this week, inmates from jails in Brazil and Venezuela managed to escape, motivated by fear that prisons are a breeding ground for the coronavirus.Chile has registered 342 cases of the virus to date.In Ecuador, Cynthia Viteri, mayor of the country’s second city Guayaquil, said she ordered vehicles to block the runway of the international airport to prevent the Spanish-operated plane from landing.The flight from Madrid, with only crew aboard, was able to land later in Quito.Ecuador has banned all flights since Monday to stop the spread of the coronavirus.Panama, which hosts Central America’s busiest airport, and Colombia both said they were suspending all international air travel for a month from Monday.Colombia’s President Ivan Duque said the shutout was necessary because some people who had entered the country had tried to avoid mandatory quarantine regulations.Colombia closed its land and sea borders on Tuesday. Chile, rocked by months of social protests, unveiled an $11.75 billion economic stimulus package to cope with the effects of the virus on the giant copper producer, but also announced it was postponing a referendum on changing its constitution.Meanwhile, a plane operated by Spanish carrier Iberia sent to Ecuador to pick up stranded foreigners was prevented from landing at an airport in Guayaquil, which is under lockdown.Brazil said its two-week border closure would affect all neighboring countries, with the exception of Uruguay to the south, after shutting its border with Venezuela on Tuesday.Its new restrictions against travelers from Europe and the Asia Pacific are set to last 30 days, according to a ministerial decree.center_img Bogota confinement Bogota city hall said the capital’s seven million people would face confinement from Friday to Monday as part of a trial run for a probable future quarantine.Other cities across Colombia, which has more than 100 cases of the coronavirus, were also under nighttime curfews.Meanwhile, Eduardo Bolsonaro, the lawmaker son of Brazil’s president, joined US President Donald Trump in criticizing China over the pandemic, prompting demands from Beijing for an apology.China’s embassy accused Bolsonaro of using “irresponsible words” and of having “caught a mental virus.” Topics :last_img read more

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US says remdesivir shows ‘clear-cut’ effect in treating coronavirus

first_imgRemdesivir has a “clear-cut” effect in helping COVID-19 patients recover, a top US scientist who oversaw a large clinical trial into the highly-anticipated antiviral said Wednesday, hailing it as proof that a drug can block the coronavirus.Anthony Fauci made the remarks at the White House shortly after the medicine’s maker, Gilead Sciences, revealed it had met its primary goals in the largest and most robust investigation to date.Fauci said “the data shows that remdesivir has a clear-cut, significant, positive effect in diminishing the time to recovery,” adding that it proves “that a drug can block this virus.” Time to recovery Its main goal was to evaluate how long patients take to recover on versus off the drug — with three different categories of recovery: hospitalized but no longer needing oxygen; discharged from hospital but still limited in their home activities; and discharged from hospital with no limits on home activities.Without numeric data it is hard to judge just how well patients did but Gilead’s statement indicates there was an overall improvement over the placebo.It is a Phase 3 trial, the final stage before any medication can receive regulatory approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).Remdesivir, which previously failed in trials against Ebola, belongs to a class of drugs that act on the virus directly — as opposed to controlling the abnormal and often lethal autoimmune response it causes.It mimics one of the four building blocks of RNA and DNA and gets absorbed into the virus’s genome, which in turn stops the pathogen from replicating.The antimalarial drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are also being widely used against COVID-19 on a so-called “compassionate basis” pending results from large trials, with early studies decidedly mixed.Other therapies that are being studied include collecting antibodies from COVID-19 survivors and injecting them in patients, or harvesting antibodies from genetically-engineered mice that were deliberately infected. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which Fauci leads, is soon expected to release a detailed summary of the results, so it remains difficult to quantify exactly how well the drug performed.Nevertheless, it represents the first time any medication has been shown to improve outcomes against the COVID-19 illness, which has claimed more than 200,000 lives globally and brought the world economy to a grinding halt.There had been mixed news about the intravenous antiviral in recent weeks. A summary of results posted on the website of the World Health Organization last week showed it failed in a smaller Chinese trial. The Lancet on Wednesday published the formal paper describing that experiment.In this study of 237 patients in Wuhan, China, doctors found no positive effects of administering the drug compared with a control group of adults, except for those patients who required ventilators. Topics : But the Chinese test had to be halted early because it could not recruit enough people to meet its initial goals, and was considered by many experts to be too small to draw reliable conclusions from.Fauci said it was “not an adequate study.”The US-led trial, however, which began in late February, is thus far the largest to investigate remdesivir and is technically the most robust. According to a data sheet, its estimated enrollment was 800 patients, a portion of whom received the drug while the rest received a placebo, with the trial conducted at multiple sites across the world.Neither the patients nor their physicians were aware of which group they belonged to, in order to eliminate unconscious bias.last_img read more

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Japan preparing to extend coronavirus emergency for about a month, sources

first_imgOf the confirmed cases, more than 4,000 were in Tokyo, with 46 new cases on Thursday, media reported.A study using antibody tests among people in the Shinjuku ward of Tokyo indicated nearly 6% of people had been exposed to the virus, the Tokyo Shimbun newspaper reported, echoing a similar study of patients at Keio University Hospital.’Faster… shorter’Japan has carried out 1.3 coronavirus tests per 1,000 people, compared with 12 in South Korea and 18 in the United States, according to figures compiled by Our World in Data.”Japan should have acted faster, locked down and contained in a shorter period of time,” said Kenji Shibuya, director of the Institute of Population Health at King’s College, London.”If this situation continues, for a longer period of time, than that under the lockdown, then not just health care but the economy will suffer more.”Health authorities say they follow World Health Organization guidelines on testing, and that an expansion of testing could flood already overwhelmed hospitals with mild cases.Abe will make a final decision about extending the emergency declaration by about a month following a meeting of experts on Friday, government and ruling party sources told Reuters.Tokyo governor Yuriko Koike told reporters on Wednesday the situation in the capital remained difficult and called on Abe’s cabinet to extend the emergency.The response of social media users ranged from resignation to frustration at not being able to meet relatives or friends. But many more worried about the economic impact, especially on smaller businesses.”If you extend it another month for the whole nation, you will have to pay out subsidies to businesses – and 100,000 yen to each resident also won’t nearly be enough,” wrote on social media user called “Katuotoko.””Places with low infection rates need to get the economy moving again.”Japan has rolled out more than $1 trillion to soften the economic blow from the coronavirus pandemic. Topics : Japan is preparing to extend its state of emergency over the novel coronavirus, originally set to end on May 6, for about a month, government sources told Reuters on Thursday, even as some other countries begin to reopen after strict lockdowns.Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told parliament that he would consult infectious disease experts on whether to extend the emergency, which he declared on April 7 for seven prefectures including Tokyo.The state of emergency gives local governors greater power to tell people to stay at home and ask businesses to close, but it does not mandate penalties in most cases for non-compliance, relaying instead on social pressure and respect for authority.center_img With the emergency declaration set to conclude at the end of Golden Week holidays, there remain worrying signs that Japan’s low testing regime has undercounted many coronavirus cases.At the same time, data showing consumer confidence at a record low along with slumps in factory output and retail sales illustrated the economic damage from the virus.”We would like to consult experts’ analysts and views,” Abe said in parliament, referring to a possible extension of the emergency. He said he wanted to make a decision before the last minute.Japan has had more than 14,000 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and 436 deaths, according to public broadcaster NHK, still far lower figures seen in the United States and Europe.last_img read more

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French fury after Sanofi says US to get virus vaccine first

first_img‘EU must be effective’ Sanofi’s chief in France, Olivier Bogillot, sought to play down his boss’s comments on Thursday, saying “the goal is to have this vaccine available to the US as well as France and Europe at the same time.”But that would only be possible “if Europeans work as quickly as the Americans,” Bogillot told BFM television, saying the US government had pledged to spend “several hundreds of millions of euros.””The Americans have been effective in this period. The EU must be just as effective in helping us make this vaccine available quickly,” he said. In April, Sanofi joined forces with Britain’s GlaxoSmithKline to work on a vaccine, though trials have not yet started, and any successful treatment would be available toward the end of next year at the earliest.Their project is being funded in part by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is one of dozens of vaccine projects underway to combat the coronavirus outbreak that originated in China last December.This month, the European Union spearheaded a global effort to raise about $8 billion for research on coronavirus vaccines, treatment and testing, a move welcomed by the World Health Organization (WHO).But Washington pointedly refused to participate, potentially undermining the effort.US President Donald Trump has announced he would slash funding to the WHO, which he accused of acting too late on the COVID-19 threat and of mishandling efforts to stem the outbreak.Trump also said this month: “We are very confident that we’re going to have a vaccine… by the end of the year,” a prediction that few health experts consider likely. The French government cried foul Thursday after pharmaceutical giant Sanofi said it would reserve first shipments of any COVID-19 vaccine for the United States, saying the move would be “unacceptable” in a crisis that has killed nearly 300,000 people worldwide.The French multinational’s chief executive Paul Hudson said Wednesday that the US would get first dibs because its government was helping to fund its vaccine research.”The US government has the right to the largest pre-order because it’s invested in taking the risk,” Hudson told Bloomberg News. “That’s how it will be because they’ve invested to try and protect their population, to restart their economy,” he said. “I’ve been campaigning in Europe to say the US will get vaccines first.”His comments drew outrage from officials and health experts, who noted that Paris-headquartered Sanofi has benefited from tens of millions of euros in research credits from the French state in recent years.”For us, it would be unacceptable for there to be privileged access to such and such a country for financial reasons,” France’s deputy finance minister Agnes Pannier-Runacher told Sud Radio Thursday.Pannier-Runacher said she had immediately contacted the group after the comments from Hudson, a British citizen who took over as Sanofi’s chief last year. “The head of Sanofi’s French division confirmed to me that a vaccine would be available in every country and obviously… to the French as well, not least because it has production capacity in France,” she said.France’s higher education minister, Frederique Vidal, said Sanofi’s plan to give the United States priority access would be “incomprehensible and disgraceful” since a successful vaccine must be “a public good for the world.” Topics :last_img read more

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